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JULIUS ROSENBERG ET AL 




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the foreign service 
■ OF THE 

united states of AMERICA 


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'There is 
■’ CpniffiiMistj^^froni prg 



ittached hereto the May 1$&5 edition of Fcgn^. 
■ be rte". This attachment is being 

tb? so-ciLled GREMOLASS^ letur ^ 


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La fellre prouvant que lie proces a ele 
Iruqus par le F.B.I. esl bien de la main 
de GREENGLASS DECLARE US EXPERT 


Pt'^ 2OM0O personnes, mal- 
I 0 nufuvais temps, ont empU 
apres-midi la stadf^ 
u ?ieiiD~York, afin de 
$otidante d Eth^ 
g’ 4 liti 4 Rosenberg el leur ro- 
se de les arracher a fa mori 
prison. 

meeting a ete si important 
« grflfida r prawa ameri- 
^ I /a Ira «ilance 

i c/iosa al que les princi- 

‘tV paux' Journaiir at les agences de 

/ ? pre\e. ettpenl repiesentes, 

^ \ prtnrip*7l orateur etait Jo~ 

I Braf/J»n, president du Co- 
> V vrTtericaiit de defense des 

!l H examine les falls 
qui motivent la revij 
. 5 . • ^iVarfu proces* Tout rf'a6or<l, il 
jaroir fju’un expert orait 
lie la lettre prouvant que 
(Suite en page 3.) 


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ROSENBERG 

ISulfe de ta prem/Are porge) Mnsi, seion sa propre femme, 
v, ; . ^ Green glass est un hjrsterique et 

le F.B.I. (police politique ama- un menteur; at c*est le seal la- 
ricaine) avail /a6riqua ife.foutes moignage d*un tel homme gui a 
pieces Paccusation contre les §uffi d faire condamner les Ro- 
Rosan6arg frHumanile d puWla, ^ertbarg a la c^otsa alactriQwa. 
en son temj%8, la photographie cours de la manifestation 

de cette lettre) et que cat ex^rt ^ declaration du 

arait confirme que la lettre etntt satam atomiste Harold 

bien de la main de CreengloM- Grey t € Je n’al pot de roiton 
Or, cette lettre, on s*en sou- d*atoir change tPavis tur ca que 
vient, qui est un eompte rendu Je disais void un an, d savoir 
de Creenglass sur les interroga- que le temoignage des Bojanbarg 
toires que lui fit subir le e^f plus craisemblable que eelui 

est en opposition complete avee dc Craanglofi. a 
fa deposition de ce mama Craan- president du ComitS oni^. 

gfots au proves* EUe ne fait il- ftemn de defense des Rosenberg 
lusion d*ailleurs d oucuna trans- ^ egalement parl^’ de. la /ontaitta 
nustion de prelandii* a-' tablo.' demf tFacciUiitrioi»^.a!ai<ift- 

atomiques d Julius 

ne menfionne mama pus ' Ethel'' g/^useJ) 
Rosenberg. -at 'qu*eite pretendait avoir ata 

L'authenticite de ce document, donnee aux Rosenberg par des 
qui proure de fa^on irrefutable « amis russes ». Or, on sail que 
Pinnocence des Rosenberg est si cette table vient iTalre retrouvi^ 
evidente que Vavocat de Green- at flu’il est prouve,^ ainsi que 
glass, John Rogge, renegat du Pont toujour s affjr^ les Rosen- 
Mouvement americain de la Paix berg, qu*elle a ete achetee pur 
et agent ti'tista, riant da faire uit eux dans un grand magasin *le 
denii-arau. Il vient de declarer Rexc-YorU. 

qu’« un document de ce genre m Mme Sophie Rosenberg, t^rc 
bien ete eerit de la main da de Julius Rosenberg, a fdf/e fa 
Greenglass et est sensiblement meeting mngnifique du / stade 
identique d cefut publie par la Randall en declarant J*ui 

presse fran^aise ». Rogge a ajoute passe deux heures, dans leur pri- 
que Poriginol de ce document son, area Julius et Ethel.^ Ton's 
aurait ete « empriinfe » aux dos- fat deux entoient Pexpression^de 
siers du F.B.f. iM-dcssus, le leur affection d;tout leuref^nmis 
f.BJ. declare quUl enquete $ur qui, dans ' let- mtmde .enfieru l«t- 
la dispnrition inomentnnee de la U nt pour leur rausef. ceUe da lal 
lettre. Mais, ce faisant, le F.B./.^wttiVa. » 
confirme quo ce document e.Wtfc^i-” 


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1* Hurianite 
llay 5, 1953 


jfonc qu’il est vrai. t|Jf. 

Ainsi, les ahificateurs du pr^ 
cat tpnl aujc-memat pris la main 
dans le aoc* 

Bramin a egaUment ionne 
lecture, au n^eeting, iTiin se^d 
document qui est une deposition 
faite par la femme de Greenglass 
tur la caractera de son man*. Ells 
a declare qu*€ il a une tendon* e 
d Physterie, que par moment U 
delire et qu*un Jour, lors tPun 
acces de grippe, il arpenta en- 
tierement nii son rctfibufa en 
di^mant quUl etait environnr 
d^elephants et qu*il ne toulait 
pas porter de pontalons in 
plomb »• Mme Careen glatf o 
njouie qu*pilt connait son ma/i 
« depuis Page de dtx ant at qu il 
a Phabitude de menlir a tout | 
propos 

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a 5" loiimee Notionsile 

re leracUmeeti’antuemitUme, pour la paix 

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^ >.S .v*l‘*'*'»8es pers^cutionx racistes du 

& temp; roccupatiort hiU^rienne, * 
i? les ciii. w - de depuri^ T^toila >-■ 
.S jok. :.jfle8 at leif fusil ladea ^ 
’Sv.'ai. . iirslrult le peuple fran- *■ 

. :. ■ • racismo et de rantl- A;.^ 

. •up^v repousse avec mepris la 
. 'bare de la discrlmitiation ra-...., 
: S\hve ovec force contre la re- 

•.> ‘ )u fl^au ruciste Qui a’inscrit 

^/-ntotives fuites aujourd’hul - 
c#; i* rhistoire la vlctoire rem- '• 

'< ••uit atis, par les hommes 
’ » .ide entier sur le nazisme. 

/ .uice< apre.s la liberation de Xa* 

■ IWaurras, Heraud, Ceilne, une^ 

:;r> .> liairuse -oi d*amnisiie vise k rehabi- 
iKrf toU*iement les 1 rail res' qui ont par- 
licipe.a ' ' politiQue raeiste de Vichy* Lies 
d*Oradour sont amnUties et la . 
s’abat sur les reaistants, lea 

'court gr^' , les baride? antis^mites et 
ra se reorganifrent. r:ipandent leur 
pr >a7aRde haineuse dans de mutiples 
.uf't nr r et publf rat ions, l^yon, Mar- 


cable d* c Arra^ europ^enne ». Le Dr 
Peters, qui fournit les gaz pour les camps 
■d’extermUiation, est rem is en libertd et 
replacd a la tete d’un trust de prqduits 
^ehimiques. 

HJTRE-ATLApiTf QUE, d’oi nous 
I 1 'parvient le cri dechirant d'Ethel 
ei Julius R^nberg, menace de 
la chaise ^lectrique, les juifs et les 
noirs sont consid^r^ selon les plus r£- 
centes dtudes soctologiques, comme les 
c suspects n* 1 , 

' En Afrique du Sud, dans les pays coIo* 
niaux et dependants, la repression ra- 
ciste prend des formes sanglantes et en 
France meme, do graves mesures discri- 
minatoires frappent les travailleurs nord* 
africains. et les etudionts d*Ouire-Mer. . 

L e peuple de France salt que le ra- 
cisme et ranlisemitiEme ne peuvent 
etre le fait que des forces d.e cfuer- 
re et de fascisme. Unanime dans sa 
protestation vehemente, republi- 

cain a empeche Xavier Vallat de tenir 
son meeting provocateur, comme la po- 
pulation lyonnaise avalt mis en dchec les 


Pret i « ouvrip une seconde fols la porte a Hitler » 

I ti * 

(Minislre de i»-'lnt6rieur de Bonn) . 

rehabilite lo CESTAPO' 

(De notre correspondent porticuiier en Allemogne E. GIORDANO) 

■ — ^ 

avont, dans notf*t^h!tr nunUro', public des documents prau- 
" vaiit qua la Dr Robert Lelsr, mintstra de rint4r)eur du gouvemement 
Adenauer, ast un naxl de ie prendire heure. ptia 1033, II signalt comnxe 
maira da Dusteldbrf, des deems ou I'Atala ton qiltisAmiUsme virulent. 

Lee nouvelles informations que noua trantmei notre oorrespondant 
an Allemagna Kgon QIORDANO, confirfnant quo in' pr Lehr reste fidAle 
4 ton pasaA. 

Lea activiUa de oet individu, principal collaborateur d^Adeneuer, den- 
nant tout son #tns 4 1'* armAe europAenne a/qu'Adalrent Agalement, !e 
~ voyage triomphal du ohanoelter de Bonn en AiqAiHque et lea discours bai- 
lloittea quM a cru devoir prononoer 4 aon retoi^,''.'. 


d m 








Telle%st la hiesure qui s’impose 
apres la decouverte de 

DEUX FAITS BI0U¥EI0X 

prouvani que GRUNOltiS, principal temain a charge 

A }JU ENTS 

• \ * 

Multiplions les deltoations, les lettres, les pe itions 

pour fatre triontpBier la Justice t 


Hmnbcirrsi..\ avril 1955:. 

D’abord uo souvenir... 
li y a deui ant; pu Parl&ir.ent de Bcnr., ]e 
rninistre fAdAreroe I'lntArieur, le Dr Robert 
Lehr, TTorita i la trlbure. A pp*!te svait-il ou- 


verbal ofiiciel d‘u Rendestag : 

Dr Lehr. -- J‘ci r.i cntenoai ! U 

discours de Mrie A Pau!, qn'i! ne I'nif 




;:z^' 











'^5 C' 




« ii/ *3 








r 


1 i 




Maire hitii-i-i. ^ ^ 

^ictait dea n^navcs .i.\tij*..N. **5 
Lehr ssi zninisire te .'iiit^ricur au 
vernemant de iionn. rebu.^c* 

du nazisme inuilif»lic‘iv- iis isc- 

nMrent lea grandea idrAir.;:>v/£'. |0A8 ti. 
certa{::s piiiiA poUUqt.orv. di/aiinv^h, 
ks getie.aux condaKi.‘.c> paar c;*‘fuef, de 

fnierre sunt lil^rea ••i "Divca- au*?i~ 
tfit carididats a hk uc -U iioU' 

velle Wehrmocht, camuiiflee i^^ua ie vo» 


peupic'S, 

Pour la justice ^£l ia lish.% 
dans toutes villas lc?» cavis 

lea enlreprises et les itfs uni- 

vcraites et iaboratoirc^', 
milliers les deldguds ii la 5* JGUuNEE 
NATIONALE CONTIlE LE ftACISME, 
t/ANTISEMITISME ET X'Cuh LA 
PAIX, Qui aura lieu 

LE 14 JUIN 19&a, A PARIS 
AU PALAIS DS LA MUTUALITE 


a ‘ 


OUC VOUf iC yClifi, P*-’- ---■ 

b^.-tca ci ta paix. C::ns A; Tion'Jc 


c..(*er, ieurs 

ortf'.j’Of:t Icii" Q*tu.'f'.cUt%'..ii u tu 

h: ^r A*, fru/ernift} dfs 
/)U'S, i /<3 wJit nn/Aflr *•;*.'•, Jj/tii 
!a G^fi'fise . .c.:rs 

p'rij iliorieusts /rffdi//on.v 
: Afs :ravaiUeurs. dishU 
rhr cricni touiouf^.^ cen 




GKKENGLASS. la condamnalion ne puutraii ci. 


iRABELAl S 

* • • 


‘!‘ /r" 

,ii I Lucius, parrii qn'Ui: sonffri.:!: | 
eux^mirnes u'nnc inJufiiL'fi | 


a^ni f/clant naafeii protaeUona 

Xavier VALLAT 


fail sez renSree 


r f ^ janvieft Xavier Va/-. 
K / lal devait parlcr tv* /►ii- 
**7 blic, .s'a//c Pleyd, an fO'.Y.v 
f^unc soiree d'hommage a Ciiar- 
/ies Maurrns. /.c pea pie de Paris 
/ I’en a enipfctte- Mats Try-cow- 
missaire vichyste aux Qaestions 
■ >■ Juives fir se ^ien^ pasj pour 

battu. 


Aver line cud ace croisfaale. 

• i7 prepare «a rentree potUique, 
pour If jour oit t'amnistie f aura 
ditiniiivement c btanehi >. 

Aspects de la France a public 

• le discours qitit devait pfofion- 
cer d Pteyel, pH il ciUbre son 

' mdltre Afa«rr<jj, comme la lur- 
irriire de FEspdrance et Ic t>asut 
de la Patfie. Afa/s ce fi'est pas 
assez. Un a pu lire, ces temps 
dernierst la prose de Vatiat dans 
plasieurs j^blicaftons ipscistes, 
et en partieulier dans Ecrits de 
PariSj rousirt germain de i<iv*a- 
rol. 


Dans un. article, // sV/i prend 
d la Commune de Paris, confir- 
mant que Vaniisemitisaie ya tou- 
jour s de pair avee ta hainc dcs 
travailtears et du peupic. Dans 
un autre, il revienf d Maurras, 
qa’il encense avcc passion, et 
dont il pose d rh4riller spirit 
tael, au point dc vouloir pubtier 
tat tivre sue lui. 


Sceaux en IP49» l*a Ub4re 
kerr Mover. 

M> Mayer* apres cette 
srantiaiettse liberation avail ten- 
ii‘ ti’apai&er ^opinion tnaignee 
eti fl//irman/ que Vallat iu 
rait se livrer d fliicane actjvtti 
On voit, aaioardhvt. 
ce qu'il en est. Al. Pr.ni Mayer 
reserve Its poursuites aux 
diripeants syndtratistes, dUX re- 
sistanis, aux defenseurs de la 
paix, retix-la mimes qui itaient 
en prison ou dans ta clandesti- 
fiitc quand Vallat se pavanait d 
Vichy ou jnstt//a/7 la rrance sur 
les ondes de Radio-Pans alle- 
‘mand. li demande la levie de 
I’imnwnite parte mentaire des de- 
putC’s de Peppositiom. Mats il 
jet me les yeux sur le eom- 
pioit vifUable cetuUld, des en- 
nemis de to Repubiique, des fz* 
citotears d la haine racist e ei 
• antisemite, ourdi par Xavier 
Vallat et sea amis. 

Comme Hs onf imposi rinter- 
diction da meeting priyu pour 
le 9 janviett les antirocistes, les 
republicaina pruvent mettre dt- 
jinitivement en echec ces com- 
ploteurs et tears complices. Ils 
■ doivent, pour erta, ren forcer en* 
core tear union agissante. Ei ils 
eiUcveront d Valtat et aux quires 
revanrhards toule possibitifi de 
recommencer tears crimes, * 


' Pour enmpenser le ttieciing 
interdit du 9 janvicr, une reuftbni 
K 'privee > a lieu der/iieremerti 
d ta satle des Centraux* rue 
jean-Goujon. Xavier Votlal 
• a pronortci ttne nonyelle. diatribe 
' dniiripuNicaine, avec, cette fuh, 
rfluioma/ioa des pouvoirs pn* 
' blics. 




Gustave COHEN 

tnHant 'M#«*r«!ie * I® 




^ C« wwiab#— 1» idyitr M wa ^ml fMn* oP* !• 

jayS ftm Im eftt inoyem 4m v 


E n cette annie du quatiifcine centenaire de-la 


mort de Francois Kabelais (9 avril 1553) ct . 
d’inquiMe aspiration & la paix, it y a heu dc ^ ^ 
cci^brer en luPle pr^curseur et rauthentique pro- - 
moteur de la.-cogojlation et de Tarbitrage afin dc 
tenter d’<iviter^up0 guerre, qu’il ne tient pour legt- • 
time que st elle est purement defensive. 

Qu’importe si *C^e thtse fondamentale se pre- 
sente sous I'aspect d'une fiction : la Guerre Piero- 
choline se joiie enlre le tyran Picrochole qui — nos ; 
Rabelaisants ront:dimontr6 — infcarne Gaucher de 
Sainte-Marthe, ^dversaire de Tavocat Antoine Ra-^ 
belais, pere du edntcur — et le taureaux, veaux, ginisses, bee- 



yr,o coftdan... 
tue uno baso - •j-*!** 

soulovalt, aana nda vAirr.»r.,* 
its f*Uo. •.:n po;**> 5A’ 

ACt manqui do €•: Jw :•* tcu* . 
jueiatoo. II ool, « etfv'* 
libto d'odmetlro qe'jaa cz 
cafOAatton aoh » ‘o.'.:.icio sur 
lea docioi •. co* 

oUtour ou d*un ^mpisoO, qui 
un inUrSt ovldor.f « IravotUr lA 
vSrlt6, ot o irar Urcr lout ou 
partio do .^crjabiiiU su^* 

la pdfsonnt >cu»o. 

Dapuio niwis, toua l04 

jurifltes t ejalent con- 

vair.cua'que alall un 


PA 7 


M® Paul ' ILLARO 


SctrOtolra da Co*.'»‘<a da 

Ddfanta cat Kat^nbir*;. | 


UI 4 VMISS^Ui sw 

g^ant CirandgousieV(dont on re- 
.trouvera Ic nom'dans mes Faf 
ces inidites du' XV* aiicle), qui 
est ie p^re de Gargantua et le 
grand-pfere de* Piiitagruel 


OMME toujours, Toccasion 
du dtfkfend est minime : 
une rixe' enlre les^ foua» 
tiers de Lern^j^est-A-dire les 


bis, ntouions ; abattanl les noix, 
ve/idangean/ les vignes, empor- 
tant'lcs cepsi croidanf tons, les 
indt£des arbres » {Oargantua, 

cSTxxvixi). 


< Un ehacun se mettail A tear 
merci, les suppliant ifitre tro^ 
tis.plus Attmflineme/u,' en const- 
dirailon de ce dll' ils avaient de 

^ 44 X 4_ ^«40«yvltlA* 


di^endant de v Orandgousier. • frage pour ainsi, soudainement, 
Ceirac-li ont refurt de fairc part > ff^e par iceoxmal vexis, et que 
de Ieurs friandisss a ceux-ci, fgg gn punirait de bref. Es 

qui offreht cependant de les quelles remontrances den plus 
— 1,A . :i ^ ripondaient, sinon ^ils leap 


payer au prix dii march^ ; il y „c ,c//urfuuic<f, o. — j 

a bataille- voulaient apprendre • a manger 

Picrocholf, pour venger les., ^g la joaace. > Plaisanterie 
. itsQs d’avoir. 414 f6ss48, ordon- >. yoco nous connaissons eela 
ne la mobillsatfcm'‘jg4n4ralc des *' 


roce, nous 
cela aussi. 

habitants de et les en- ^ h. j^jvent & Seiutly. dttreus- 

Mge aux piref. *xcis : * f?* ' eanl hommes et femmes et pr*- 
Tanls el dissipags lout par ou • ",“”,”<.4 qu'ils trouvaient. 

il, passaient, tan, tpargner nt ■ ?“"» ; 


Comment ne nourrirait-l-il pas 
Fespoir de jouer de nouveau un 
rile, lui qui a sur fa conscunce 
la deportation el la mort de 
120.000 Juifs de France 7 Srt 
reprise d’activue a coincide 
presqitc. jour pour jour, ticfc ta 
venue u la We du gooi’crne- 
1. Writ, de celui qui, Garde des 


Le public doit j 



L 'ART nigeo a tuacIlA det 
beriu, d«t diTOuMloni, des 
confifonoes, et austi, pa« 
mal de batixernos paternalUtes 
ou faussennent admiratives qui 
conlpibuaienl k donner une Idea 
passabtement faust^e, da ca qui, 
est en r4alll4| un art vlyanl cl 


arn-.iiAinmeAt ooouUfrt. ap| prtmitlf mala eeolement un 
*^laln Ratnaisf jsul^ r4all«^ jrt £«4rant da nos conceptions 
teur a aul Pen doil UidA a fluer,' ^ctdenVflaa, 

les museee do uontirosrdO ^mp8, cC.w>n’P*flnie d© Chr 3 
Bru.elles cl da Paris; pclili 

prouver par un co}fft-n>*traq| *® Fertival de 


I* LSI statues meurent sussi 


« Ceiie civllisallon dlff4r«nle 
d© la ndtr©, n^sjj'ul exist© a, y 
est dScrIt© par^diilhs*qu®*t ***• 
statues, des ohjaU tour 4 tour 
sourianu ou Vai^ques, malj *vo- 


prouvvr Mi. -ymt.zz 

quo I'an nkgres o!tst pat un 


Cole%^ "MOREL 

.(SuUc eh.^ge .0). 


Its envahissent Ic clos dc lAo-. 
bayCt mais 14, ils 8® heurtent 
au brave Fr4rc Jean des_ Entorn- 
meures (pron. ures), moine moj- 
fiant de moincric, admirable 
creation du romancicr, qwi 
attfloue et les ab^t du baton 
de la croix (Ch. XXV! I). 

Cependant, Pkrochole, roi de 
Lerne, passe le gu4 de Vede (la 
g4ographie locale de Rabelais 
est dcs plus precises et peut m 
lire sur une carte d4taillee du 
Chinonpis) et assaille la Roche 
Clermauld, dont on peut voir 
encore les grosses mu rallies, 
qui se rend sans rdsistance et 
que !e tyran occupe et fortifie 
a son profit 


T ANDIS que le vieux bon- 
homme . Grand gdfc9i®i'» 

apr4s souper. sc chauRe 
k un beau, claif et grand feu, 
ou il fail griller des ^fttaignes,- 
remuant la cendre, avec son ba- 
ton, brfll4 d’un bout, et fait a 
sd femme et famille ^ de beaux 
contes du temps jadis, un des 
berger^qui gardalt leS vignes se 
transporte devant lui et lui ra- 
conte les exc4s et plHagw que 
faisait picrocholf, roi de Leme, 
en ees terres et dommag» ' 
Le bon vieillatd s’en dCsolc : 

< Picrocholf, mon ami aneien de 
tout temps* de toute race et al- 
liance, me vient-it assaithr ? Qai 
le meat 7 Qai le point ? Quj le 
conduit ? Qui Va ainsi conseidi 7 
Ho I Ho I Mon Diea, mon bcu- 
yeur, aide-moi, lnspire~mot, con- 
seiile-moi d ce qiF est de fui- 
re / > et il conclut par cette 
phrase qui sert d'exergue au 
present article : < Ce nonoos- 
iant, je n'entreprendrai guerre 
'que je n*aie essayi tous les arts 
et moyens de paix. > (Chapitre 
XXVIII.) 

Le Conseil. convoqu4, conclut 
avec lui qu’on eqverrait quelque 
. homme prudent aupres de Pi- 
crochole, ce qui ne Tempcchc 
pas, a toule 4vefitua1it4, de r.ip- 
peler de Peris ou il fait ses elu- 
des. le jeunc G4ant Gargantua, 
son fils € afin de maintenir le 
pays et difendre A ce besoin >. 
Sa lettre (XXIX) contient en- 


Uux Umoin. Cfc a rt8*ort*lt du 
caractSr© menaonger de «es ©i- 
ftrmatlen© ; Optfenglafl-: iv 
en off et dSposc . qu'ii ” 

I© dibut, ©t n\hr^t *;vom - . ' “ 

reatalion, d4i -r do v-. - 
©veo I© gouV'ftf-^emooi ; f>- '■ 

procurour g6nora' Saypoi bec’-v- 
ra, au moment An la- condairr:.- 
tton de Greengiait. Quo ce der- 
nier avail commaneb par n.or 
les falU, at que ce "’cat no 
»ur lee Ineuncea a© sa femme, 
ouqi e'bt^t ••f'fin dbcldb a 
^ coopbrw avec la. qouvemo- 
ment ». 

Lo^faux tbmblguaqo de C rcc.n- 
gitse roesortalt agaSoment a’ 
fagon certain© de J'lmpositi.- -lo 
sclentiflque dev ctp'oiVi ioot W 
e*4tait vsnlA d.my ta iKpoc;iioft. 
8on « assex bonne ocscpipt'o^i 
de la bomb© aicmlque • cr. oo*;- 
X® pages, est ime Impowucilito 
qui avail 6U '..joltgrt©* pa? dc 
nombreux eavort?%. et nofunment 
par le professeu? Vrey, P; . '♦d- 
bc) de Physique, <*ur» das grand* 
aavants qui ent dlrigS l«s v«- 
vaux d© Uo© Alamos, 


($ui7e en page 2) 


(1) P. 95 do rSditlon Plottord, «ix 
Bolles Letrres. _ ‘ 


M AI8 deu* fans nouvoaua 
viennent de dsmontpor. 
mdme pour les persem-ev 
lea plue Sgarces par ic. passion, 
qu© Oreonglasi est un fiu* te- 
moln. L’accuuallon fiL en eftot, 
grand cas d^une Ubie my^UriOu- 
ee quo, solon Qroengla.** el *» 
femme, lot Rosenberg aurolor.* 
4©gu comm© cadcau des ^ Bus“ 
ees ». Cette :..fblo nurali com- 
port* do savaiit^ o!s^^»i»ifi» n**^ 
meiunt ds prendf© 
films. Lee Rosenberg 
au conlralpo qo’il s’agliaalt d one 
tabi© d’occaslon d'un model© 
trSs ordinaire, qu’Ua avalonV 
achet*© dans un grand ir-'.^jasln 
do Hew-Yorx ssif'le Wacy-o 
pour uno aoi ‘ ^ 
environ. Lo ^ -‘Kr-r 'VPi- 
le© avail oon, ov *•* *• 


(Stfi7e en ^a't 




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pfriiii jm ;p ) l ii i '- I'qw yy i-ja 




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D K O I Y 



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BILLETS AIGRES-OOUX 




» V.' i 


i i:ViMo:<Y 


Le chapitre des ioventioDS 




.•* >{. M 




tl «Ut < ^ i.t (•iilt'. i 


V OliS Havr/ Monsieur le Secretaire 

genera y a pauvres' hoiyteua. Maia 
peijt'^tre iKnoivz^voim quMI existe effalement 
invent eurs nonteux, trop limides pour ex* 
p(^er teura fravaux. Je riKi^orerai^ comme voua td un 
^ hasard ne m'avitit in forme de leurs prlncipalea d^oou* 
vertex. Je me permet^ de vous communiquer le h&tif 
catalogue que» dans i'mierdt general. j*ui. cru devoir 
en dreaaer : 


IjU Ihvim’h* juuu-i^irt*. — 

0*eit .un perfeotionRement 
' des lAverie^ si en vogue au« 
jourd*hui» oont t'inconvenient 
•St de ne tjUnchir que >• 
. Jinge: 16 nouvet appareil des* 
tias sus tPibuf.«ux «t/ p!u£ 
partlouliafOmentf • «ui tribu- 
neux blanchit, on 

outre. Ice incuJpes pnvile* 
gies (tort Ion nacres, delsteur*. 
miticiens rstrottds, etc.)! sux* 
queiB notie juvUc* rdeerve 
volORtlere tos revsurt. ^us- 
qu*^ present ii lul fsMait !our 
cO;ibssr&r piusiaurs stence* • 
daso.'RuU, ^irhc^ 4 un ihga- 
fMstix dispc«)t<r/ qut meUxe 


ton, Georges Bonnot* Teltiin- 
ger, Ybam^gsray* etc. on 
lire su sort d’autraa cartons* 
dont ehacun reprdsanta una 
fonotioii publiqua : oonaolllaf 
municipal, es^cutour dea 
Hautaa-CSuvrai, d^putd, ad- 
nstour, prdftt, balayaur* ami* 
rat, ministfo. ato* i chaquo 
Joueur ragoll la oarloii dont 
le num6ro ooeraa|Mnd A eo* 
iui de ion propra carton } la 
gsgnant aat calul auqual eat 
attnbuia la fonctlon la pltia 
lucrative. 

I i:)ius8s aux Korcieres; — 

Autre Jau .non molns at* 
trayant, dO A l*1nvtirteiie 


ca Umoigrtagci, Adulcora le ^^Artoain iteo Oarihy : daa 


ar* . 

'ft: 


requlsitolre ot Intanslrie la 
vlgueur du plaidoyor, l*ap- 
■ porall pourra debtier las ao- 
^ qulttamants en sArie. ir oa- 
bonca aOoilArAa. 

l.e Cor»*ir|iii? Midgway. — 
SupAffauf a tous. 

» l/escanH.'lnur llrnn ' Ki.vul 
*'do Orennbit' ; . - - Cat eppa* 
'^rait da preatidiglutlon a aiA 
aaaayA avoo suooai non aau. 
lamant en Prance, male an 
Bapagna ; il parmat da taire 
.InatantAmant dJsparaiira un 
ou plusfaura eujats, sans 
qu’on pulssa las rai^uvar. 

• Le napjiui a«-adi}jriitiue. *— 

• Mafvailleux produit, dont il 
surrit d*arroaer las paupin 
arHArds pour laur reveler lag 
blanfaits de la civilisation. 

i<G preasr-ininV U inri;!- 
(ioii r^actioniuilro. qui, adop* 
tA par la mlnistare daa Pi- 
nancas* . tlrarail des contr}- 
buabiaa la maximum da ran- 
dement. 

Le jrii irvotu»nl>. • — 

Pour aa dlvcrtlr an soolats. 

V Sa rAgie, fort aimple, est 4 
peu prAa oalle du (oto ; on' 
'diatribua aux jouaur* des car- 
tons numArotas, porUtnt las 
noms da nazis mincurs frap- 
pAa naguara d’lnAlloibllito ou 

• d'indlgnita nationals ; Mar- 
quai, Xavior Vsilnt, Peyrou- 


sithouattoA da aorolAraa A 
profll aevlAtlquo aoni fisAao 
par una charntAra aur una. 
piancha A hauiaur ' d'honv* 
me ; lea Joueura to plaoent 
A quetqua diatanoa ; le ga* 
gn«rtt est calui qui* avao un 
minimum da flAchattas. abat 
la grand nombro da son* 
ciAres. 

4.’H«.j>ipah‘Ur AUrnauer. 

6a disiingua da toua tea a^ 
pireiis da oa ganra 'an da 
qu'il na aa oontonta paa 
d’emmagaaJnar la peuaslAfO : 
ii a daa aapIratJona noblaa* 
CAT il absorba tous lea tarri- 
tolras qua rAllemagna ravan* 
dlque. 11 an axlsta un modAto 
a musiqua, qui Joua lo 
lU'Uisi-iilaiid iiiipr allr.s, avao 
orcheatration amAHoaina. 

Vous dAploraraz avao mol| 
Monsieur la Sacrstalra gAni. 
Pal, qua cat ramarquablaa 
inventions m'aient AtA'aigna? 
lAes tardfvamant : allaa na 
peuvent plua partioipar au 
Concotirs da oatte annea : 
mais il eat A prAsumar qu'al- 
les n'auront point, malhau* 
reusement, perdu I’annAa 
prochalno la mArita da I'ao- 
tuaiite. 

ge vous carals done trAa 
obligu de las racommandar 
A <0 bianva.Ilanoa du Jury ' 
d'admibsion. 


C-t. XV AU XVU SieCUE 


C:yo#jr gyommde confve catftic^e 


Une. ziche civilisation 


resplendit et s'6teint au cceur de j'Afrique 


Oi:SQl;E, uu XV* Aiecle. 
^’empire manding fut 
a l& fir, de la pAriode 
de son apogee, I’empire son* 
vni Atuil A la veille d'auein- 
dre !a bienne. 


•M'’fenipirc sonrai est le troi- 
sitnie grand empire de la bpu- 
de du Niger. Hi'riticr de Ghana 
et du Atanding i) fera s[^pa- 
nouir cette civiiisation originale 
qui jeta un si vit ^clat au XVI* 
jiiecie et deni nous avons vu se 
farmer k^s premisses. Alors Gao.* 
Tombouctou, Oualata, Djenrt^, 
devinrent des centres intellec- . 
tuds qut attirArent docteurs et 
ecrivains renomm^s du Maghreb. 
Des cenacle:, s'ouvrirent, des 
university ceiAbres od dAs 
diants blancs venaient diercher 
une formation sdp^'rieure au-v 
pry de professeurs noirs.' vi- 
lent leur rayonnement ^galer 
celui des university de Cordoue 
er du Caire. 

(Jueile rAvAiarion que ceTle 
d'un mouvement- IrttAraire au 
cceur de TAfnque ! Et comnie 
elle vitnt jetef le trouble dans 
I'espnt de cenx qui admettent. ' 
'-omme yntendut* I'inf^rioritA dea 
Noirs ! 'Pourtanf,’il faut »e "ren-' 
dre a i'y^idence ; plus de cent 
kographies oc savants, de pro- 
fesseuTs. c*lk*fivains nous soi>t 
parvenue.s avec ta iiste de leura - 
oeuvres, traltant entrA autres^ de' 
droit, dc gianimaire, d'astrono- 
m«e,' de math6fn.itiquefi, de m6- 
decHie. d’histoire et dc .philaeo' 
pbte.^ Certains dc ces proles^ 
sCurs sont Invites A :enaetqner: 
dans les university ^trangcres 
fci Ton eo voit ouvrir des cours 
au Maroc et tn Egypk- 


Ahnud duDi.'.. le ccie’orc jieri.i- ^ 
consultr tombouetkn, eionna ies ‘ 
Marocains par sa vasrt culture, 
tors de son ex<t forcu dans leuir 
pays. 

La qualite de cette culture ** 
dtait tetk qit’un jeune phv^qim* 
toulousain, Anselm d’isal^uier, *. 
ne ^ sentit guAre depaysA a ' 
Oao, oil it resta huit atvs, conti- 
nuant ses travaux. 11 se maria 
avec une jeune fille du pays qui 
dtait loin d'etre tute ignorante. 
Le jeune couple alia s'instaiier 
ensuite a Tououae, en cotnpa- 

f nie d'tin medecin soudanais 
ont le graad savoir fit une 
forte HtH>reflsion sur sea confre- 
res de France. Nous raconte- 
rooiL.plu8 longueiQent..ieur Ins* 
toire dans un prochain article. 

Environ cinquante ans Nub 
tard, en 1470 un Ftorentin. Be-. 
:nedettb Dei. nistorien, diploma- 
•te et leprAsantant -de comtnryce 
de la maison Portinari/ nr^e 
ra -Agpiement S Tombui*’" 

La dhose lui pa rut .‘li pen if^zat 


■5 

vitiaation squdanaise rec'ut tin 
coup funeste; Ti^s peu de ma- 
nuscrits puK’iT^ ' Atre . . sauvAs. 


Parmi ceux t^til nous spnt par 
Venus figuient Tltibadj ou re- 


scued de biographies des doc* 

• tcurs de .Tombpuctou, d* Ahmed 
BAbA, ecHte au XVP.siy.le, et 
trois c Tarikhs » bu- ciuoni- 
ques dea pay4! pigAHens.: le Ta- 
rikh Es Soudan! oeuvre d'un let- 
trA tombbuctlpn, Abdherraman 
es S4di, qui le. composa au dA- 
but du XVll* iiAcle ; le Tarikh 
El Fettacb Q'U Chronique du 
Cherdheur' bbiir servir A.l'hia- 
toire des des ami^ et 

des priqcipaux person na^ du 
Tekrour, Knt'au XVI* siMe par 
fn.iifn^?nsiuUq Mahmoud mk 
et enfip le Taakiret En Nizian, 
,qu biographies des pachas du^ 
Soudan, qui fut 6crit vers ..1750 
id^dbnt I'aute^riest bconnu.' 

Cea tarikhs pous ont aidAs. A 
. re.tracer rhistoir^e de I'Empiie 
aC^rai, A fcifbwer ratmosphAre. 
de. In vie d^autrefoy. iis aont,\ de 


ibfdinaire qu'il relata 80 r* voyage i ' jodra^itii^re, tvto populbi* 
en quntre'lignes, ce qui ae^lc ^ tek vni^ et villages dur 


prouver, qu'A rApoque,.cela ine 
reprAsentait' pas un. expteil, 


, 'dn . Yweing^torix 

xdricain 

Pendant plus d'un siActe, oct 
empire prodigieux dont Torga- 
nisatibit intAnedfC n*a ttda .A^ 
envier oux. rq/aumes chiAtiens 


Soudan. Et cbtpment ne pas ap-^' 
prouver cy S^danais qui pen-| 
sent que ce pa^ glorieux ou* 


vre de richet'^^rspctivfs d'av^ 
pir ? . •. } ! 

vifq CARDOT. M 



IE Dr niKT IKSTALUIT UTIASBOillG 


un musee de cranes "inferi surs 


If 


I • « 


A U coun de fanner fV4l, U 

Zl Dr August Hitt, membre 
* * des SS, fdace par le re- 
’ gime naii ti la direction de flns- 
titat d'Anatomie de Strasbourg, 
eu/ fidee de constituer une rol^ 
lection de squeleltes julfs pour 
d^monfrer irrefutablenienl . fin- 
firiorlti conginitale de la c rare 
jutve ». 

Uof telle irutiative, si carac~ 
iifisiique.de la perversion df la 
€ .^rienre > aazie ne pouvait que 
rencontrer u/t icHo favorable' d 
Berlin. Dans son important ti* 
vrfriquisitoire . ; < Croix gam- 
mAe contre caducAe .i, ‘le Dr 
. F rancois Bayle relate tesjH vers 
ipisodet de cette affaire ‘''que Id 
.victoire des . alUis . empicha 
tf abouftr- 

C*est dans les Urmes 
vmts que Hirt expotja son peofft 
d Himmler, son ehef ^ 

<1. ..Rapport sur yobtehticfir 
de erbnes Ue commissaiies bol- ■ 
cheviques juifs A Tintention de/ 
recherebtft scienfifiques A I'D hi- 
versitA atlemande de Stras- 
bourg. 

« 11 existe d'importantes cof- 
Icctions de crAnes de presque 
toutes les races et peoples. Ce- 
pendant. il a'exi&te quA trts peu 
de apAcimiriis de -crAnes.de la 


de U mA^e epoque, 


Un medecin soudonene 
d Toulouae *«• 


IVs voyageurs comme LAon 
I’Africain, pni vu des bibliothy 
ques pcrsbnhePes qui pouvaieM 
attvindre deux milie volumes' 
IVffervescence ! que provoquajt 
I’arrivAe d'un manuscrit quT ite 


mirtislAtAs ' vafiAs, ‘ses 
teurs de pbfds et mesures, .ses 
agricuttenrS, ses artisans, ses 
artistes, ses irtteliectuets ^ sts 
commeycaiiti, ‘Va/^exercer son 
uAgAmcnle Aur *i'6ui le Soudan 
occidental. 

Mallieureusement, i la fin du 
XVf* siAcle, les arrfiees, rharo- 
caines, formAes de la tie de 
de toute I’Europe viendror.t Mr- 
eager et dAtruire Tempi re son- 
rai- La rAsistance du peuNA ful 
admirable. La longue iutte 
TAskia Nouh contre lea aritiA^ 
d’occupatkm eat digne de. figu- 



vo;r, accouraient delout le ra 'fnAme valeur 


i.t r^ lerrs Atudes supAneurea jj p%y^ que Vercingetorix ou le 
Uicnne ei suitout .A Tombouc- • t^pnel Fabien, dana Thstoire 
uiu.,La ils «c irouvaKfnt en epb- dv 'Pfance. 
tact qvtf des etudlants yertlifi . ' l^'^hibltothiques fur«t dA- 


race jctve Mrmctlaiil uiie etude 
vt des conclusions prAcises. La 
guerre a TEst nou.«; foinrn.t une 
occasion de remAdier a cette 
absence. Nous avons Toccasion 
d’obtenir des preuves scientifi- 
ques et tangibles, en nous pro- 
curant les ciimts des commisr 
saires juifs bolchAviques qui per- 
sonnifient une humanite infy 
rieufe, repugnante mala caraciA- 
ristique. > 

Suggerant one ntHHode pro* . 
tique ff organisation, il aiotr ■ 
iait : 

< Le. meiJlcur moyen d’obtenir . 
cette collection Ut* crAnes sana 
diffifuUAs, consiaterait A doonec. 
dea inattuctioos pour qu'a Tave- 
nir, la Webemacht remette vt- i 
yants, A in Police du frorit, toua 
res commlsaaircs botchev'iquea 
juifs! De abn cdtA. Ui Police du 
front d^ra recevuir dcs iristruc- 
tlons ffin de tenir constamment , 
au cquranf irfi certair service, du 
npmbrf et du licu de dAtention. 
de ces jul^' captures, ti nura “A 
les gsfder juaqu’A TarrivAe d’un 
onvoyA apAuUI- Celui-ci, charge 
de retinlr le. niatAhel (un jeune 
mAdecin qttacbA soit A la Wehr- 
macht. aoit a la Police du front.' 
spit ,un Aludiam en medecine' 
pourvu zTune ..voiture gt d’un 




.V' 


cundul'trt*,'^ d*f'i ra prtndre i.iic 
sArlcr be ji ••'.ugrajThies et ties 
rnesures rip.i topoiogjqoea: il dv- 
vra s'asaipjf*, aut.int c-uo po^^:-* 
ble, -.de I of dc .„ date de 
' nnisaance e uv- autres JunnAea 
personiieOs: uc:* prisonniera 
< Aprt,. . '3 mori oi^ ces 
juifs. dont on aura soin de 
ne pas e.» ^mmago,- ia tite. 
il sbpa.cra a tAte du tronc et 
'Tadressv'^ . so.; poim de desti- 
nation a.in}, n liquide consefvj- 
teuf, dan= n /ccipitni scclIL 
^Acialem. r:» JesiinA cei asaae. 
D'aprAs photographies, les 
mesures '.lui:..;.. do/uteex de 
•laiAte.ct lui-mAmv. k'. 

recherefc r . 3 ;.:- :omir comparer 
-at Jes 1 »ai L: face 

(Rassen. iit c/tigkti) sur let* 
donnAas ji->glQue^ ,;i- ‘o.- 

-du crt\nf nur la forr&r e* i;. 
dimeobor. L.i ver\’e<^ii ei aur 
beaucoup cnosea, pnur- 

roqt alor:.;,Hj:T»fofncei.., v 

-'Ltti fesi- -nn: 
dti Dr *fr^, it *uii . , 
qut KijKirme- 
mtr n^'res:. 
de i.irt, ^ qi ii . 

positiof c' 

dont il - . 1 , > •• 

/C/I94a, 4..' 
desepr 


-r«l 


' i: 


7JM 


' 


RABELAIS 


Cl.v' 
i. :■ ’ 


Uii (.• 


-"*■> iii' rot. 

iit Sat^wetief 


;•*. t“> (Safft iff la pdge I!) 

, -. f- . .y - , 

core ce« beltab paroles qu'tl faw; 
refire : • : ’ v- - .f- 


.* Ala; diflbiration n'est de. 
provodutn dins * imais) (fapai- 
ser; (r.nsmi{lir,' mah difendre ; 
dt eonquest/rf mew de garder 
unas fiatut idffts" et ter res hi* 

‘ ridit aired, n" ^eltes est hosth. 
i dement ians 

cattse ni et de jour en 

jour., pouradlt-lid Jurieuse enfre* 
prise avse ' 'fxca hdn toiirabiea 
r.4'persqnaf«;7/6>^ff (/ihrea). > : 

!ipcasqger dtoActaA vew.: 
Pkrod^je'^CstXririch Gai- 
. let (2)!'. Si. Ia. harangue 
qu’fl fait; a PicrbchpJe.est un peu 
>lrop ctoArdnlaKper il importe 
cependant de 

.-comihe un modeje Ide' bon aens 


du 06.^, t. du .Maro. .,.d-EB?pr Iru^h'/T^ 

dispersAs la cj-| ’ diliohhelle 'a Ta^uille hi fie ; • 

• ^ . ‘ i • • • 


i.::K 


jP3Mis^u*ogt ne v ous le ait '-'iiilSMm I 




a QtuUe furie do/ic.’lfAmru/ 
mainfe/fanf toute alliance brlsie,- 
toute amitii conculqaie, tout 
droit tripassi, envahir hosiilf 
meat ses terres, sans en rien 
.avoir Hi par iui ni ies siens en* 
Mom magi, irhti ni pravoque '/ 
Ob est loi 7 Ou est (oi ? Oil est 
raison / Ob e^iAuma/dii ?. Od 
crainte de Dieu ? » . • 

L'ambassadeor conchit en rA- 
f lamant le retrait des forces 
d'agresston, une ' indemnitA de 
mille beanns d’or* dont le paye- 
ment sera garanti par otages. 

Personnellement. Grandgou- 
sier est plus conciiiant que son 
ambassadeur. Pour Ayiter la 
guerre, il. rendra des fouaces 
.par charreiees. • L'AnergumAne 
voit dans ces concessions un ai- 
gne de faiblesae et ac contente. 
de prendre fouaces et argent- 

< On n'apavae pas le cr,.co- • 
dile > cisait, de notre temps, 
Churchill. 

n tient un Conseit de guerre 
qu le doc de Alenuail. le Comte 
Spadassin et le capitaine Met- 

/I ^ • I i f »> * ♦ * 


i nature et compfejnbri des Fran^ 
, (ais quUls ne vaient qu'd la pre*' 
^ mlire poihle. Lars its $ont pires 
que "dtablest mais s'ils sejour* 
iien/i Us sont moms que fem*[ 
.mes ;»..(XVin),- Picrochole, dA- 
iv aesperA, a’enfuit vers Tile Bour 
'Chaid. et devient pauvre gagne- 
deoiers 4 Lyon, i 


C 'LMBIEN noble U concion. 
ou discours tout cfcAronien* 
que Gargantua a tail aux 
vaincua. ft par lequi-t H leur an- 
nonce qu’ils les rend francs el- 
liberes (libresL laiaaant le 
royaume * de Picrochole aux 
mains d’un fils en bas-Age, mats 
fait iivrer 'Msrquet ct tous- 
les mauvais Conscillcrs de i- 
crochole, et ordonne d’inhiin: ,.* 
les inorts et soigner les bless- s. 

Quant aux siens, il les reernn- 
pcnscra largement, Aeur donnaRt 
des fiefs et a frAre Jean tour le 
pays de ThAIAme, * jouxre la 
•riviAre de Loire >, ponr y in.sfi- 
tuer sa religion (couvent), au 
ednfraire de.s.auties ct -seiD.i va 


ff i-f 'er. .'‘‘nl ,init:ariit t-. 
'f.-t-it TiCfU St tectiohnt.. 

•••<’ futittf irajfr.Tyrie" 
d ort lls if.'.:,. 

iphyxiis /r.v chu>! ■■ 

gas, sou^ if rjni^die ps • 
au commandtitn 'd>i tysmp, / 
Kramer. Leur;, rod {vres. er. - 
d Sttasboui,i. dey.iieKi 0".- . - 
coaverfa d la Hbhatto,. rr ,a 
vilte, Hih nVyant pv 
temps dt! les L.-rc dispar >;}rf 
Noas.voyi ' ure ::: .'3:ra 

Uon parlicuiu 'vriU' ie 
ia barbarif rt gai ne pwr* 

pas a cu \edn vtsoge 
tiideux SOU:, tr . /^. 

scieneet 


Htrt a fui, ti a p eehup^ 


, ^ . .u p 

juste chdUmenf fl 'ail parttr 
res criminr!,; na:: font ia rffta- 
Mutation Cf ♦ dUtsation se 
pourMtit * •» /\Itemi:gne Or vide n~ 
tatr. // s*,',7#7 (f^voquer n'im- 
porte.lequei de leurs criVnex 
pour que s impose d fnyrit le 
devoir sacre de tout anU!.. 'iste, 
de tout patriate : import.. ' .;-j 
le.< armts .si-iraf rendue^ u ^ • 
iris monstres. 


.a 

.1 




4 






\ 




r 


Un Jivre subversii 

^ ♦ v*'C u-f travail •'», i*om- 

. rVi.-viior’ lU’.i uctivites antiameri- 
twines : 

, VL- a*t-il pas que les rou- 
pot 'int leur entreprise de 
lUibvcTs a) traduire la 

. C'cM du moins ce qua rcvt'le 
itn r/uj.tieur * sore tires emc- 
^ nt«5.‘ M. Haro?-* Velde. La der- 
traducf amcricaine de$ 
Lii're3 Satnts. £e a 10 indlions 
. ri’ejceinpjairea, est, annonctM-il. 

communisie. Et il 
^ _ -a •Mpevt: huit •‘rypto^otnmuniS’‘ 

■ 'its par-n^ '*^aducteurs. 

. antiamericain V 

ite en bandes 
- inent t'Aarore 

't sans douie, 
v ■ . i- foi. 

iirn'u Opera Mundi 
a V- • ■ •rs le mopde 
: n\k'V' fjue. 

v L" . de <n riep 

‘■'OuUieniies. 

, ijfemiers dei 
amsem posse- 
' one a rend^c ja** 

loux '3^^^an. Wu^-at aux amourf 
rot Salomon.., | 

^lufdi ces comics... » 

C’eioii iexiu* 

.. Ui lS;o*c^Le New York 
itc.’i fO hd emprunte 

'iMi ■^;.nboic puj; symboliser le, 
I’^atte Atlant'qm* 

IVurqii .»> .. aor^s tout ? , 

btif Vf -ica»;n ■'•che de 
N'oe <a 't'action, ^ kr- > ‘ -v 
*\>> c : et 

de Vhu. Ci 

Pour c:in»iaine : !’«» *■? . 


C'esi i.- 
iji'-i rt*pat: 

rer ih’^nt; 


n 


TARIF 

m AB(^NEMc«iTS 
;BBQIT 

<H>, rue (le Ch^i^duo, Heris 9e 
■ Til. T TRU m: 
fdANQK e> UMp.N ' FRANgAlS*' 

Lo ,.8 . .V*9 fraoee. 

‘ EXaHNCERS 

UH rr- ; 4$« frtOCk 

- TA^ ^:v?C^AL 

HO' Hv.UJIQI:K 

Ht. n.'Mi.; ^T0-9S Pari# 
et cb«n(ciz^.;ita d adreaae 
• ■:r 'tO /renei -t la darniAre 

aaTi4?r 

’ . T<. rre .U Parattn. 

aPV? «V) — 


«# aawiS.«iUIJIWt| 

Egolile 


L:i passcrellc attend les voya- 
^jcurs a embarquer. 

Ell Icgende : Et ies animaux 
rntrerent an d an. 

1^ animaux ? C'est nous. 

Merci beaucoup. Entrer dans 
cette galore, ce serait pousser 
lilt peu toin te rcapect des ^'ri* 
tures. 

X>«i gouts 
•t doe coulguts 

Tout ce qu'il y a de moms 
triomphal, ce voyage en Europe 
des deux ^missaires de la com- 
mission des .QCiivUes ^w^iamiri- 
caittes : MM. l^oy Marcus Colm 
et David Qecard Shine. ' ■ 

I Is ant -dtouvert ^ans les bi-C'/ 
bliothequesc4M 0.1, ea Altema-.;' ' 
gne, des tas <le livres inspirit 
p.Tr les raagesc .’r 

Hxemple : Le Faucon Mattais,^ 
i/ Homme, k^gre, Nick geoite^- 

, t"""'" 


If VOtCi b’ASCHI M 
NOI OU ANYIIIACIS. 
TK.- ' 

D wat n Se par. J«ort 
Effal pour lo 4« JquT'' 
noo Nationota, aUe n'o 
rien da eommun ovac 
cetia du Hvd Yaak 
Marald Tf^na* 

(vetp oi-.dpasus) 


\ Avec ba loi .sur I 
et les naturalisations, 
i.an 8 e..{«>se en dtgne. ^ule^dM' 
Mac Carthy. 

On chiichote a son sujet 
approbation : C " 

« II ebt faux de'direjf^ 

Mac Carran protease haini 
particuli^re centre l^'Juifs 0 
les Strange rs. car pl^jesse 
une haine egale cjttin tout le 
monde, sans diejitfrtloag |[*pngh. 


■> Oftw^jo. rw.tUEJ| 


-»= 



. ' . ] ’ vogue d'dhtisifniUsme ' en. Ui4 .t>an 

iibmigrMipn •$; ‘\i^gromes dans Us ^^ Jinanci Hi 

jrpimocraties Popplaires >, ♦ re- tl y a bi 
iAurlaaT to)a He Nuremhtrit en has. 


\ » ''‘‘Antfrooinno iloctoral. 


en. Oei'.banuaiers juifs out bien 

V. M 


ne Ou de race. 




Pas poasep^ '-J 

vt •■•]«»» Vtolu 

; -ya / .’...■ 

• EtAiDfli 7y Telegraph raconte 
- cettZ/petite histuire- AiUii-^usctUe. 
<^hs" ^ ^^^tiloir.H jde l*ONU ; 

; Qn. soifi ^ohverne- 



man-ditective/tx autres romans 
policiers. qui n'apparteHaient 


ment grec a off ert adx Nations 
Unies an ' bronze reprisentant 


ju.squ’a present qu*^ la serie Zeus, Afot^ on assure avec le\ 
n(|i re o u A . la " sfWe blBme/ . ' \ '! pjao \ ^and ^erteux * que Vinten- • 

' t ion origineite da gpxrvenwnienf 
CfUOll^ ggiSUlia tfAHiittesHaU rtoffrir uhere- 

\ ^ ,y plique'^a bronze de to V^jurs de* 

keactio^ de U pre^ anjjai-^ Mifo. // en anrait tU dissuadi' 
se, Iot 8 du p^ge A UmreSj; qq^ 5 ^^ reprisenianis id Alan-* 
des deux inqulsiteurs ^ „ haitan qui fui auf^ient fait sa-' 

Les chiens poUclers de Broad- voir qup la V^a fUt[ MUo^ ne' 


way sont venus et partis Qitws 

Chronicle).-. 

' Ves gamins outrteutdants ' 
liourrcs d'auioriti et (targent 
(Daily Mail)... * . . 

/vef ieurs uctivltis mipfisar^ 
hltf^ ei i^ars empreintes a/gi7fl- 
les. ii^ sont dans ta sordide tra- 
dition des jeunes. gens stupides^ 
depaurvus de bon sens, a exph^ 
tieme ei de eonnaissancee (Dai- 
ly. Miai^or)- ‘ ■ 

Chosse Uagique 

C'eet grAoe au travail des' 
gens a la Cohn et A la ^ine 
que les Juifs et les Noirs sont 
c'MtsIdcn^s <fommc, « 
nurii^to i > aux U.S.A., ainsi 
que Ptndique une rAcente' etude 
du Research Center for Human 
Relations (publiAe par D.L., !e 
niois dernier). ■ . 

■1 y a mteux. 

iirnlart avec fiertA ses etats 
(le service, R. M. Cohn a souli- 
gne qu'i! avait c pris une part 
, importante a la condamnation 
* dv juliu.s et Ethel Rosenberg ». 

Hn pcis'oit lA les abotwiftse- 
inents tragiqui» de cette clwsse 
rux sorcieres* 


pourrait jamais enpvt^oux i/.S. -I 
A’, Hant donae que jamais, les\ 
autoritis if immigration ne pour-\ 
raient prendrr empreintes 1 
digitales. • ' • ’ ; 


(mrhox j^ii ^e Nuremheng en 
ijttim'apne^H^taje 

'Pes « anil^cistes > d*Oirasiprf 
• a^Jetil era par ees slogans,, 

' j^vivolr enekhie Ja'PTopagatfdf :, 
guerritre.- 

I ~:']^,plauf A pris le d^noutr 

i rpeni.de faffatre des midecins 
Iks voild qtii rAaW? 
dohjf jfur dcian de calom-- 
ni^j./^vee Af/oL.'lu preuve est 
fdild'gut tantisimUisme n'existe 
:pds dansJet.fHiys dU sociatisme. 

. '^'Aforsrgue vahl-ils Uire ? ftutp 
trpnf^f leur ^'ou/pe , ? ts'exed- 
strpni-ds ? 

. plaisantex l^Hs tdeherd 

de ^'jlaire bublier tears eampUh 
goes ignoble et ridiet/dek' flk 
affirmsnf :/< Nous avions iam 
tptt ‘ ■ ; 

' Bt reux qui .proeiamaienl Ig 

ietdrent. — 


bien eu des Juifs colla- 
bps. 

Un Juif, Reni AfoyYr, a. bien 
llhere Xavier Vatlal: 

Ators, paurqifoi n*y ,aurait-il 
pus de*- juifs au RPF, hirdier 
de Viehy, parti pour lequel Van- 
lisimlie Tt ochu-appeUe d voter? 

Or done, le sieur Moskoviteh. 
« ancien Hive des tyeies CAo/- 
temag/ie'cl Hiuri-lv > {atten- 
tion.^ ne i'oitfondons pas 
etait candidal de Mk de Oautte. 

Les aniiracistest bien .sUr, ne 
.v'y 'sont pas trompts. 

Mais un jaarnal, soi-disaut an- 
tiracistt, Ltf< DroU di; Vivre n'a 
trouve qii*uq candidpt d monter 
en epingie. d prLWnler, uvant 
ies elections, eomme un poiir- 
fendeur de iracistes : le sieur 
MosMovitch . ' ' 

ttus-moi qui iu friqaentes... 


viriti.' ilk kk 
quaiifiis 

Lo dxoitdo tHpgtouUlof 

I Pour appuyer sa .di.monsfra<^ 
liph boiteuse (quL sunn ctlo, ne 
..tiendraif pas debout),. Bernard 
; teppeAe/a .reeptffi g .V^rgumem 
.•suprAme ; le teij^tpatllage de.s 
iexies^ y y:\. \ ' 

^ La Pravda<4iJ \1 by rjl. ierit- 
i it, annonee que ' d^s&kmdi \ : en' 
Uruon SoviHiqtre} toutj^' incitA- 
Hon a la haine ractale sera se-' 
vAretnent punie-^par la loi: > 

n ' met sim 'piement au - , futur 
, une. phrase qpeda.f^rfMiju idu 7- 
avrij) met au. ptr^qettt. pif .U ajour 
te. pour plus OY vrdisemblaace 
.le mot < disprmais ». Ois lors, 
ce qui est une citation de la 
Constitution SoviVfique/ un prin- 
' T/pe fondamenlal du rigime, de^ 
^yient un hypdthitiqve prqmesse. 

. Par ees procidis,- .n’importk .. 
qui peat pnoirver.ii'impbffe gpoiy 


Etrei^u: 

Dinoncer'des Moskoviteh. tes 
juifs qvi a/ttifiuanci Hitler, Us: 
cottdbin des < fudenrat > .cries 
par les nazis^ cUst ividemrhenf 
!atfpr‘ contre Vontisimitisme. 

Cette ividenee ne. paiudt pasi 
avoir frappi le Droit de Viv^g.^ 
Mener cette tutte. ceta iquivaut. 
pr it end-U, d re peter les Protoco^. 
Us des iUges de Sion. 

Certis, les Protocotes des Sa- 
de Sion, ^e faux monumen- 
tat Qu^abreuvent les aniisimi- 
tes, continaent {fit re aocifs. La 
■Vietoire- lex reeom/wonde d .sejs 
-1 /ee/em.'. Rivarol, Asp^ts .s'en' 
inspirent. ' 

Mais. la Lica ne mine pas cam- 
pagne contre ces journaux, ni 
contre leS' Xavier. Vatiat, ni con-\ 
tre^Jes tiourreaux *naz/,s. Elle 
prefire otiaquer les anliracis-^ 
' tes ■ eapsiqueats et empicher[ 
V unite d'acHon contre. Vantisi- 
' miiiswtgC' 


D 


I.W Vlii.i'KtC d\ AAUl 

<mt pour nous d'uite actualitA. 
saisissaiite et recente. 

Apres avoir tue < ces chiens 
turcs et mahometibtes > il se 
fera' e.mjweur de Trebizonde. 
SeuI, un vieux gentilhomme' 
nonime Echephron (en grec, 
prudent) a conserve sa lute sur 
les Apaules et dit : « j'ai grand 
peur que toule cette entreprise 
ne sera seinblable a la Farce du 
pot de lait duquel un cordoua** 
nier se faisait riche par revcriel 
puis, le pot verse, n'cut de quo{ 
diner , Qui m'aime me suit 
ve ! » cfindi-t le tyran. ‘ , 

ES iois* se deroule hoA-^ 
vitahle guerre, niciiee par' 
Gargantua, revenu au 
pa>'a, frAre jean, son principal 
' capitaine, (Jymnasie, Ponoc^a-^ 
K.i. Emictnon ^et les autres. 
tircndgoiiaicr traite humaine^ 
ment Touquedillon, prisonnier, 
et rinterrtnit.. Ini remuntrant 
(XLVI) : < 'Lc temp.s n'esi plus 
d'ainsi conquHcr les royaumez 
tfVic domuges de sou prochain 
frire ehriticn. Cette tmitation 
■des anviens Hercule, Aiexandre^* 
Annibul, Scipion. Cesar et nu-' 
t.-es itls, est cantrat.»^e d la pro- 
fession de VRvdngile. pqr laqueH 
le nous esi comonje garder, 
.sauver* regie el aaministrer cha- 
‘ cun scs.pays et leues, non has- 
titemenf envahir les autres ei ce. 
que les Sarrosins' et Ha r hares il 
jadis ; ' appHatenf proaesses , ' 
’tnaintenant nous appelons bri- 
gandages ct ir.echiwceii. > 

Dure et audacieuse le^on pour 
Its Rois de France, qu] avaient 
envaht ritalie et pour Charles- 
Quint» cet autre Picrochole. qui 
allait peqAtriff en Provence, et 
parvenir jusqu'en Avignon.. 

Les voisins offrent leur allian- 
ce mais Gargantua en Ies remer- 
ciant, dit : < qu'il eompqserail 
cette guerre par tel engin que 
besoin ne .aerail font empiche"' 
de gens de bien >• 

tl donne I’assaut a Picrocho^ 
!e dans la Roche Clermauld, 
qu'tl emporte. car < telle est la 


de son epoque l exempte du ty- 
raO' que mine son ambition, et 
du hon vieiltard qu. opulvc tons 
les nioyens de conc(!\'’.t’on avant 
d’engapt r. une guerre, pur.nient 
dAtcnsivo, qu’il mvner * jusqu’a 
U ‘Victoiie finale. 

Grufttove COHEN. 

■ (2) P«rMf^noo* rbm' pormi oroutrci 

•cmi'.rebU. conwfta Pkrpehol*. «t fic- 
itH* comma GrandQouoar. Asmeot (Ju 
Aoi d Chinan, vttt I S3?, dele da pu- 
bUcotion du Pontogruei (On voir eeni- 
bian Robalaia e»t 1 ' (Kiuai •). 11 (ui 
envoyi oupria du Poa'amant da Pont 
QOUr dS.fandie i«» 'int^Sts das mor- 
chonds da la Loire dont Antolna Ro- 
btUM bat rovootf, contra douchar da 
Sointa>AAartha qu'incame Pirrochola. 


Motrioge 

Nous avuns le platsir d’an* 
■n^cer le manage de notre ami. 
Auurice Fenigchiciri..du Cum'tA 
i-ide section du ly^ avec .mic Syl- 
vie Ciuraiiu. Qu’ils trouvciit ki 
les lAliciUtionx et les viuiix le\ 
jneillcurs de Oroit el Uherte vi 

du mrap: 


« DEFENSE 
OK L A . PA 1 X » 

Keviu Inifrnalunair 
.13. nib Vivienne - P.\niS-*« 

Oiraotaue ; P, QOT 

Md. an Char s ct. MOfICMi 

> 

’ Kp venlfl dans luux 

Abunnenienu : 

'b ftuia ‘MO 'tv,, i en iiO fr. 

eu Oc.P. S17e-ei iParls 

La revut yiii - fait ic ■ tour 
du monde. Reproduite en 
13 lungues dnus 25 /mys. 


Homme est un oui a Vhomfne ** 

B 


,.\il Hdn ■ iireiHlcp- liviv Alnrb. le jcUiie Inlellecitiel e.sj 

< ‘Poaui Noiraa Maaquea.^ partly, a la . rodepouvorl4>, des 
blqnca »* ’RANONi'-,>^^?^les eiylH^aMnnib nqlreb, la 

b'impose >6mihe Un''a«thant|quc. noire; I'art uAgre. :Malji 

Arrlvatn antlracinlo. .14 60001*6 rinlelligence mallgne 

)i a ieti^ -dans res pages ie cri ..ilu .blonc ebl venne. 1^^ 4ulogcr 


f dfmloupoilv 'di! 'joiinc •■^hflllars 
abnrdani la* c mSfa pairla a pour 
1 vcnlr heurter •ii’ front le miir 
des ’prt‘Jug»'s ra;’iiiu.>c ; en con*- 
inencant par’aiipremlre g«e son- 
iinfance,- dtJA, avidt (^\6 Irom- 
■ peusemeiit 'bercY-c aveq des 
Udres pour enfants bianoii. ‘ 
It's^Atoii nninl du a ■ curricu- 
lum vltno » que la civUisortlon 
cY-llvre sous- !*nslornpl11e dt la- 
(•iiltui’G, Oepcndanl. !r rr.nndr 


de ses refuges. 

Lu! re.<*luit-il d^aulres Issue-^ 
'"que la rAsigriation, rimpn^catlon . 
- 01 * le nilmcllsme ?' Oul, repond 
*KranU FANoN.' et' eel acle .ds* 
equine as t; 1 6 ebp^ If^ plus exoN 
lani 'do siiii Hvre : a 2a eaeul 
longtomps A pteurer puis <d 
ms remit A.yPf^. » ' " 

.A vlvro -et A voqloir coinjii-en* 
dre. 'Et .dtUH Una unalysc ser-. 


bcs formes les plus supti- 
t(-.^ :j pateuiolislp pu. ' bon p«- 
fdnt.MoffiricI laApie, AlnsI, par 
ce (juMl appellc VlmppslUon cut- 
toreiio." ii munlrp Je^ ravages 
(|itc peuvunt ftUre u^x AnUlles. 
pur cxemple, lo syml^f|stiio piio- 
.-i; Indus dans la Ull^^IVturc, les 
ossiiclatlons d'ldbe^ touies faites, 
eo^.THifes dans 'eRp>^i>. **1 
iUi«> ‘c kngage: 

■ Sans ' doute sa rqrpiatK?n C^. 
' n« vehan! ys ie -thcl bii}!,. _ -l^au ieo ." 
>;’* % ’ntcrnrotaUiip.i;'‘j.j3UbieollveK. 
v'uls s' 1 1 range ..'liHg^pplmbCb el 
untiHAmilcs dans^ 

*r pnlhotogie mien tale, ii -n’en- 
-i-i'ji'c (uis pour (^Ip Itt lb*-ia- 


hlanc le cantonnull dans sa- ..m'o qui. esl.en mime temps rd- •• .peu'lquo do i*aolsrint\ jtlGn?, le cu 

a«l it i;ti li* iilnrl mcUlral. Lc . rAquisItoIre 


par deiu ir cri de I'honiinc ecar- 
told, la clameur de ses fr('*rob 
esclaves des 'plantations coin- 
n'nlcs et ic sens de Icnr luUe, 

.Noiirrl (ie falls, souteiu: O’un. 
bmit 0 Taulre par le fivnilsse- 
UH’nt de ta vie et la rccherelie 
de la vdrltc, ce Ilvr* es* un<aele. 
d'Ui-.eUbat)uo capali't* da t!y)\ibler 
plus U’une < banne conacianea >. 
,,Mais Frauu FAXON le tendlne 
P9I- un aotc de fui t.f drf* con- 
.'j;iRr.e dans Ms vie lid rc ^ d»s 
hom'uc^ frctenv^lr, qui -o; opn- 
fiTo loutc so Vilen*' hi'*-u'^iqe : 

^ L’bomma est v-% oui A la 
vie, A la gAnArosilA. L*homma 
. ■ eat un oui a rhomma. 


« lUiuicUr », IVurennail i-ana re- 

lapbA.dqni xa nC*gritude. 


qu.iHlt(pre, .raiilpiir met 
ioinportement facNte 


Jusque o'cit asl niUinmdqi affalbil, 


PienwGSBSAL 


.(PIEINTURE 


Felicia Faennowska 

t (Gave-Qalerle St»Placide) 


All-ta 'wate rt le, MnK« 'laf aiHievU 
■' Sts » etw v* — pvr tom oftiit«W 
Teaieiirf ett-it ao* F«U«io tocoiiow- 
Eta, aal a aa|A -a a* «•»- 

btmttm oxaMlHea* «t a>d, opft* 20 
aaatw 'A* tiavall* est «» pii a rri dot 
^aapta la #•*«• dm wmt hhvomw mpoM 
a^ Is afeadt'o to*« toata- 


i ,11 MO vral aa'aa »«Uaa d$ ton it- 
'■ qUu fmivm, alb Sfait «*«* reccbpatlaa 
^ Atom f laiMcdbifha aa«t mwl i wiar f - 
^'A'aaaaoaf. Mah mmm dm pmmdrm. 0« 
..plait bt AMarlam ha ant vab tsatat 
■aa cfaafbM a ai riib^t e i - 
Attfsa avah oAbaa b abtoma dm 
fCeab tas lebaM-Am a Vtnnvb, alb 
arrtsa A Farii m lY12. Sa^A aib nt 
fah aea tiavalila*. Haiim* ** voragaf. 
'Mmterd ia» ahaaJia* FaaaHt dt 
VAmmdimlm dm Va«a*». »-‘*<ab dm Pm- 
•H* faihralt daabla lOdiaatt. 

. iaaMtatra tai Aftlttm t m rntptmdm mtM 
(AcaKb 4a Vya» ba -1045, dm 

dmtmm a'AiAMib »♦»<. t. taco- 
■ namka a»«#a pt^f aa»iJ aapoai- 

*.,qom i Aftt erapidaum e^taaaiA Cra- 
▼lira Canfeatparatea, ated miC* d'mm- 
t»aa man i ftt tpHaaa a«tw»iams * Roaan, 
Aia ba * , W Havr«; Aabit. dm- 

p$ft at A HAtiaiK^ : « Laatrai* d 
Aoma, A MaaiTarfc ea C«<<aae, aa 
AaitroNa. 

- ‘tba Mean pycaaemba Mt Mm 
acQulsat ear b gebii««t e'S-taiaert ta 
b mbOMhhtmm M«na«wb,raer M VUb 
. Urn < tafit, aair b AUbta* dm TXUmmlt, 
cafal dt aofparvili (Caifsa) <f pm* 
rUabanM 4a Vonovk. 
ft veici tab la Gabri# SKPbcl4a» 

. aaai aaans r aace tio a de ▼«;> la mtm 
■aiabb da tat trovaux (toilet, oeea* 
cbBA aoftal^, fravaras) d'asa t#e> hm-*- 
■ 4a -taaaa. Haeeiiamfce astalb tleas b 
•'Sravaia, aiab a*ast-alta pot ca ai^ 
ma faaim tobr b la 
at fanaa 4 qbi aat toAat, done N»»" 
tab ravimnfi^ aaa Taa eraadpeit tsi, 
▼aat OMir das baUas 7 
L*iataiult4 4a sat esdk^..'. .t yenaa 
far uaa tea U n fjI t a tntbbtire, 1 .? 


le Maa, FWM. b reaa« ar^aiaah’abu 
<84 a baaacaaa dm teas aautri^ Va 
iM b plm seavaat l aa Atd I# aabe^ 
I'hMMia 4* trovatl, t« «^ney«. CaiiM 
a(*a attmtianta ait «etv« taiia i mi fdi - 
saiftaat a « a *aa*» aMtbttai e*oa»4aa'eaa 
te^ts bbew aatamAas 4a tpebas atyb 
ras, aa b VlalAa'. Ft*"**** W «* Pe^ 
4a Dba o» 

P o conaa iAu a 4tadia b sfalet^fie 
a Aaasa, 4*o£i, prababbmMtt, c« a«aa 
pfabrnd dt b caftstruetba dee* a** 
fiavoac, yyi* varacteriaant ancara |a 
sebrbti, ea dapaallbnient pro n on c i. 

On pa pact parbr da taaHinia an 
av*a'aafft lai vavrm da Pecanewsfca. 
C-'ftt ana tran^atlrien da (4al 4 tia- 
v«f« (f)a OfepXisaia vatoetal Mm aat aac. 
•( na taab ow'a 4esWr eua cp p*m- 
phhmt, fpiKhont parteif a faftbaU, 
n« s ‘7 tiob pas. On raconnait t*4s pan 
*K< Pat 4e bat dan* ba t a b ba iw 4a 
PetaaobiM eahiM -faainia an aat Pan- 
t«ur. 

Tenia CARIFFA 

iOe b i b Chardin) 

Tafun Catitfa 4te>t artiste 4a tbad- 
tta. Aab a rdTlii* aPa atrit evMl das 
tihaat. lib a tvavoUta cHax Dalb, 
baa an Vkaa Cabt e hicf. bats sa pa*. 
&ien, c‘a«t b pabtui*. C'ast b .pi^ 
; asbra fab aabib axpeia aas tr eras 
at ta pmrtk Pancaurejore. 

Taata Catitfa a prfs pour Ibaata : 
b Peiiopa 4a TIpiias. C'ss- taaoiit 
rvac ba cantimtas qu***b chaaeba sar- 
tour a aanftmiva. La tr-, bba dander. 
On abMroh valr so pal :ura plus Apr;.. 
Tank n*ast ..ttirde nl p«r 

n{ par b s-.'bdalifina. crt 
3na pairvhwa sat.Na.' ||la eba^ 
ciia a Mr* »%cata a* 4*-' *■> a**a 
eo a-jefftd. 


L'AM^vTSUa. 


H CjfaU VaTnoa : ana i.-y»p»;tRnta rr- 
rawitten ce JUof> ‘*‘ 4*0 Mutar. 


^ A b Oeicrb Zme.mt' 
sabaloh 


vrth y— 








i 




t J . -- 





o n o 


, .^ i T t I • « « T • 



■t 1 i 

i ;» 

i 


"4. 

I 





•*; v ^>.- 


■ r f ' 







I 


I 




ir 


T. -r C! THE V Journ^ *!i“*la"MutMlwi k*P « * 

N .“1. e-nve.- ?“5 


T\ chain, au Palaw de la ^ ^nvenu que tout permat- 

EnaembU noua avo^ conv^q pl„, 

iiklr *K rettU^Mf** ceit« — aiiaombla noua 

gra \tli«ae qua *!.- commaiidalt (U r^lUff ^ 

“r::rNifto«.r;"rpuu«n.. ,». «taB* '• p^' 

.« “L-ssrr-x. sv««- 


fl<| nombf# 

j. pofl»cl«nc« da la 9*'a'' * 
v.n* fatu*tion quMIluilrent . 
'jk-l* 4|U* fconi aa 

‘ pi«««nc« au 9^“***^^ . 

e,«>i ^^aqiP* «• «l“* I ®P*"*®** 

'■ bite'*'* la<n®na« !*•»» a*' cna»- 
minieifo ooUaborawaf 

0OM^?0y * ^tiin VAmIbV 

pMleniion d*un xmw 

a*...i*iuwu'* «* «“• ' 
irtJiun.. I. itti •“»• »•"*”'' 
la .!'>«• <*• »«alf pfononcdf Ul* 

public a ^ 

!«t aiienlait coinmU W 

^ c.».fc ehampi-*lya*a» par W» 

vocation* antijulfai 

* ro..c.r.l4r d. 

l.*c* , #a Touloute, 0# 

®^‘^”''»,jplQ,utlon anUtintlta da- 

•’.‘J'alrp HoiUy * . 

t» fot* <!• la i®i d*afwilat)* 

• 4 -. »?iaaoi'l^ apraa la* a*»a**l«a 
dCtfpdaoai tou» !•• tr^troo.ai 


Mt. Warra ■ou*»"9» 

MriiMs P.-«. ^landlo. Mai- 
Poyfouton. Ti*lar-Vl«naft- 

1 GliarlBS PtUMrl 


\ 

pourtuIvlM 9^ la •**«• 


•^•‘non-llau »4n*«i Poot 

•Mra au pia»l»o, qul aomml^ 
•n 1001 plutlaura atlahuu 4 la 

mwm O.I.U. «••• *“!!I2^!LiSi: 
: vM at M liOralrla^ pi«oraaai^ 


Lm trodittons antlro^ 

tM d® I® Fume®* 


I 

!»pur les " 


, scv.nuticn , dc'l^ce a 
TunaniniiU t ia r-.t'rnsere 
rfceniun du Corrttc d Ac- 

ccTan’Wice. 


wow l>» titOM I* .u« 
fbtu QUI, loin d*atfa 
oon*tito#nt Qualqi^uaa ^ 

4 l 4 monie d'un# pollUqu* qu^ 
# romettre tur plod 
malfaltanco yiehyota tn FronM, 
i comm® ollp Mawril 4 r*"*^ 

sanoa dc rh««*rt*ma 
1 “n”rd.nt le, accord* do Oora 
«t.ae Pari*. aMI* *ulent rauMc, 
concacroroieni la 

Aux EUts-Urvla. doui 4 mln*nu 
peyoholoQjc* ent itabil QU* ia 
c cha«*c *us sorciirw » • 
poua do piaoor la* fao»T? 

le* Juif* da- 1 * ! a petition oo 
« sutpaou a* 1 »• . 


L-.oi.wiw"""* «»“•'“ ••“’’•I!: I 

jIa ia*ba* matlaat a n* 
n*nt* >00 at. Jiihu* an 

r:jsr:'.-‘^r 

wpondf. •“« to 

^ p.1, 4ul p«M»rjJoM iM»J . 

tro ♦!« * l» #«•>»• /«>™» ” t« 

10 mOino <lo«n«f <• MW 0, 

rtt »u« mwifooutlono <*• ••«- 

Koiowno. do »«•«••<"• •••• •»“* „ 

,uJSa»-»». !>•->• . 

Satoumor I’aitontloi* de* anil- 

SSSaaoitanir*»^‘*f"^2^‘ p 

^ aur 10* voloo faii»»a» «« **• • “J* 5 

uiUiaot dan* I'.taniuf# at la J 
*1rort i\eurau»*inant, l® P^^'* * 

francid. lea a Vdi ' 

raoUto por tSSfUU ‘ 

luttioo par tradition, p*«i***»a 
paa ambition, noira paupla, aaa 

oMmoa. *•♦ lniail*oMiala, ont 

«H c non » •«« , 

aaa da oorropuan du naWa mapa-- 

•ntlMOloU do. . 

La paupl# tranpaU rdponfl « 

^ la danpar aat I4 ou laa aa*a^ 
ilna raUtant la UU at non U 

. • aa^utaot Uf to fill df «0« 
gut *«uiant la Qua^d -‘w- 
a Ki CO* Jourft darnior* piH par" • 
U • ml* 4 I'oplnlon mondUlf fa •• 
a fair* una ld4a plu* 
d da oauE qul •oryant - 

a Aa vHifL oui la craiqn^^ 

!!! Ce esuo aignlflo ^ 

i- Pour nou*. potra 
m claira : nou* d*alro«8 Ift ^ 
6. rien qua la pal** * iltiV.i. 

La cal*. *V*a«t . 

)U pour la* anV\^3Wto^ 
ia da ddvaloppw: Iat5^a 


tott, to bonhaur . 

C*eat l*by*tof<o ^‘^* 

v5^'- 


: ':2,r " 

nucoiC’prooM do lour I , 

““•.n dOl.nd«.l 1.0 ?.'; 

Dou* ddfandon* la ^ no 

tou*. la P®;r® a^la lla- 

•lon*-nou* au P®*®*® jLilar 
tualito. la 9 daodmbra di^ar. 

Caiia appreciation re*i« 1“*^ m 
Kn ampri*onnanl la# 
las plu* Ittclda# de# antlmd*t#^ ! 
I# gouvernemant Wayar fall tout ,p| 
la oomraire da aarair la 
a cru poutQir alntl ** 1*® ta 
^avoif mat* “ 

pputigua da otto;r.^J»;i®^ta 

‘"rd*®irBo7«. pour la |^> *i ;;; 
la* llborto*. prouya qu**i o a# •*» " 

ta cau*a Ju»to dr# Ro*3r.b*N J 
raoualll* ebaqua lour dc« adb*- 
-alaaa aua*i d mtoa oto* M dluar- 
aa* qua nombrao#aa. 1 , 

Um nouvolW I 

qrande otexp© '• ;■ 1 

ca* condition*, laa par#* 1 
■ oactivaa la* plu* brlUanto* o*®^l 
i ' *rant 4 nou* pour fairc una V 
joum4a WaUonala plus «randlo*a 

• • aocora qua la® pr*c*dentaa. 

■ Oartos, la davouamant Inla*- 
tabla da tou# •ara n*c*i*a»ra, - 
-• unt pour alartar. rawmbiar, 

• unlp da* homma* at do* famm^ 

• Qul, par mliliara 4 trayar* tout* 

A ?a rSnoa, Wiront laa d*l*^u««. 

• QUO pour assuror la rausnU ma- 
torlalla da »a »* Joumw 

X ' i^ala. i 

*k - Avac i^fithouaiaama, auao cou- 
ti, rao*. no“® abordon* una ncu- 
yalla at grande 4tapa da ,1a *!• 

' de noire toouvamont qut va- ae 
di d*veloppant, tort da »a conflanc* 
M daTxX« et da canrMn-. c*] 
.V . ■ miUiars d'hommoa a*- dn r*n»nx.iE 

iii. w noMo pojo. 

t'noa c*l*« ^ reclame 

lu’; at !*ar.i:«em}tl«m# oe w®®' 

.... peer T-t'O ta paH toil 


II y o ^ dins... 

'IWlilieU 

mclBBE 


r F§lP8 IM 


II y • dduVdiit. lo 
^aun onnlyofwir* do 

&y'*rn“r.rw'n..:« 
-,i* wietlina du* rawantOi 

nouvalU yiouiw •Maa*ln4 

atalt a legalamfnt * a*w 

ohajM eiactrlqu. a«® 

U8A. 

la rrance f" 

ivaiant panWp*. pour 
lAfitar da I* *ao®a», a una ba- 

uilla da Piu^ur* moi®, diHgO# 
ggr la 

u-onnio idliw**. 

’T^S.iJoSn?* « *•• 

It* mS, %itoil^«® 

" oSw'i* p*' »*“• 

dOmooPlH* r 

i (ou«P cnoii WMl lonoeoni. • 

1 ■ A fhourdSi* '•• **^'*i^. 

1 rv«n'*r.wru“V..- 

lu»M?» P^“'“ST.Ceinu d 

I cPtef ( Hrttoubler d afforta. 


I mi II M ■vH»p«vp- 

p. ASLANT d.d dldwu» . ”^''forc"dS“rp;ix‘‘r’ 

* Dulle* «t Geoi^* Bt- . mouvement pour naus fetje tti 

f.rrs.«v “t.‘- 


rtuus fe»c v^vfc — Cl wiuu... - 
50US la devise roniaine ; * si t 


r< '^y.' ,-#, BK# 






- S ■- 


jTv'i'* 


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•;i*-VK7 

■"'.vA''- 




!W3* 




mdmrn 



























w 


K^^cootf* atf rt*®*- U y e ®c» ' 

. ■ ■ nn et aue veux'i pai*. P'^P"« 8““* 

I'&rm^e europeunae et que • ^ 

» . . fra^ncaifl. * .. ... _ r»n<i d'rxamDles, 


niii (Mpdiftci ®Kliy«»€lst© 

_ WW .nnTt®aa«:U. '.ft .0 « •» I • - I , 


;»• suiviiCt 

«,e MSOt’ * I 

Mi.-jvrU'-.nr' ‘ »» if,;;a*m’Uama. at pour la 

La Idoufoment oontro ■» ' .tn-Ma avac -®® profondo dou- 
n’ d^riw..r'l oimo rwpMt* du 

''“^**'* ** > 4p' ^ fsndnpon, 

■“““iSVrdo ComItO d-honnw, /•• ; , 

r «1* t'/irt sOuf' * “ 


i'a.rmcc 

le gouvernemunt Iraii^wdr 
senUnt dC qesslner duns le 
oayrU au Parlemeni une 
Opposition croisoante. n e« 
oas ea mesure de 
dea promessea bien sniisia.- 

santes. > , 

Voila con‘!rn*.f-. 7^{ . 

1 tt-3arole de ta « ®;. 

laiitique :-. ia thr.e,d' 
ment de la , 'v.t 

I'acUon dea 

ctelac'.e eux P'-e'-s,,;;,,; 
r-u! devt.f.. u - ’ 

d>,nnihi‘er ce- : -a*- 

A OHO* vi.- I ac, 
tile? Hi'.e vise I accord u. - 

I b»^ c’nc !.'T»rc!."¥ nuissances, 

I ICS c nc ^^.>- j d* 

• In '•>^nC.U.'5S .* ‘•®.. 


H n’y a pas d'exomples, 
.;crit Sirus dons Le Monde, .q« 
ia course au* 
tifiee ou'ellc mt 

' 2. rra*d*rrf» % 


arnements. a .a 

M 5'rancois Maunoc, w 
•’Academic Francaisc, pcnsc_ an 
..t da-.j e UP monde .ou .1 

s’ .vjcune autrs paix qu* 
-I'e O'" ^epn.'. si now cn som- 

sans 

'ic^ufe it s’a^i-niiSoS -c d'one 
-Mlition qui ne saura.t rdpondre 
’iux ot'res w paix], pour .>ou- 
ace, tee par un accord 

s> pri.-*, mais sc«"’P®S;« 
. ou aux ycusx 


j V i r-'*!’ — ■> 




^ Is . .'t 



^li> ••V— ^ ( 

Void lie. : j 

], Soc!i:j: • *'-•’*•" • 

-if ■■ vA. &•• • zi 

'* ‘/'list .r.-v^OO, At...v.fC i 

Ki.se. : ■'<«« . 

80 - 9 ; Pc '-cae^. ,•;•***-;■ r" ! 

i0(^: VarsoviC | 

Zyl^Tiov,. 10 . 00 .^^; 

6 jOOO. Total : 1 Aa\j^ ir. j 

?,. Premitt's ccorAptes v.* 'ti { 
par :if.i sections ^ i 

■ . 2 * arr., 6 . 690 ^*’. r I 

7.200 ; IV. 17.000 ; 2 CS. 
Sicsfteufk. «.W 0 - Toiai : 47.390 

;•;. A-'-suus : 

r.iCOTe.rs. 15.000 <acom^^ 
Confv>ctio»i nofflmw : 10«» 

(acompte). Total : 25.000 fr. 

L.s membres du jiiteiiu 
Sationat du MRAP : 'TOX) fr. 

:,. Colic lie a i’aide de Usies : » 

S'i.jfO 0 - 

. f, CoWtyjXe par : Pf 
2.0)0 ; Kornblirth. . ChiU 

3 700 ; Hutman, J.TpO ; Creiz. 
gbn Tct.-il : 24.200 fr. -j 

Totai iv ce ;our '. 220.250 
Ces premiers rfesultat.-i sont 

eneoura'fiyants. , 

Ne*m>5Mins, i\ taut fane beau- 
co,ip mu-*.x ft it faut fa.re vitv 
Riivoy.:z-nou8 rC-KUlieremcnt 
lejt iwmn»e* que vou6 aiirez col- 
lect^R. 

Ou'unr iimulHtion *e crt.*e cn- 
tre Ic# sections, or}»anwatior.s 
et oociitv^ • qui arteindm ic pais 
vife TohjiiCtiT fix4 7 


ciT.ouvants. i’cic-gi. ^ ^ 
ra.-.c ra:4ent p^triote, le pres- 
■ .M,V. oiriffeairt du Mouve- 

; de ;a Paix, qui.»'er£:^ -£- 
. j si soLvent a i awion cc 
}v.":ap Cette allocution est 
V^r la salle debout, qui 
ou.>crv2 ensuite une minute d» 
siU.iCe, en hon'imase au grano 

^ispayu. , 

Au pibiiv de son rapport, 
C.i.;.-.es PALANT. .sttrttaire R<* 
rti.a. uU MRAP, evoqut 4 Mn 
tour la vie exemplaire d Yves 

y^xjr ne se dHocheront ■ 

'■ c'is 'J^ aoit tfon ei noble vi-. 
Sa mart tragique nous 
fuit tin devoir de redouWer a€^ 
iort.^ pour unir les Franfois, tes 
Francoises dans ^ 
r:an ouur la sauvegarde des /j- 
oeele^t pour M dilense de la 
pui-r... » 

Albwl YOODINE : 

« Noua devons roBBem* 
bier It. moyen. > 

I zicmcUirs incUsp®®*®* 

^ bl®Bt * 

Aprea l« rapport At 
Palant. (font nous donnons, 
c!' autre nari, Ue large! 

Albert VOUOINE, membre du 
Bureau National, expose le plan 
financier dont )a 
necessaire d'ici la Journee Na- 

^'^4 La 5* tournie Nationale, 
ciare-t-tb doit fire plas grandto^ 
se Qoe ies precfdenies, car le 


0 *affffe section A Vnntre 

^ A Aha.m AlAf OAtf MT 


t* 7 cyt:i. d ac h. 50, o tu ti»u, 

M MSMiKt 6% n9*f *•"*' 

Z^ort** 9m\ont, ^ r4«n>f U« 

p«rat«Mt> •« tldft a® t,«^ 

M d« ctttt >• Vfo- 

pmf^horn dt !• a* Ummi* W«Honat* 
•t !• iou-jcfisn®® n«ur •** 

vrir *e» traif. 

L«« ttetioni d«* S’# a*. Xir, »i » 

!•«, to*, ao*# 

gnolct tt Litf7-C«rfO« **«I*f»* l*Sro» 


10* Aim0N0l88««KMT 
t« 10- McttM, epr** »• ***•••?•!: 
M MMfoHMi •• ***^ 

b4»«, ortonHf ■»• 

«r skid I. ■«« <• 

la » 


11* AWItO I<Ol88B |WgilT ^ 


Cell.* <M* 2* at 4a 11* »*#ta»aivt feHP 


4 u e» at .4it IS* dtaitsf aOi#** 

**Aa taa»i 4*«aa intafoitoftta dUca^ ‘ 
ston. lat rasfd**"*®*** »«baai 
axaMiadraal coACrttataanf lat oiaytM 
da raalhat fat tdclMt tixfti M* 
CoMttt d’AcH«i. 

8* dt A' ARRONOI88EMBNT8 
Oaa Hat*. 4a »atrt l a m ant dt4 44l* 
«4ai; paitatit w appa* *1* Kva« da. 
Ro »a abt r fl at »fa «*o«» 7.Mi«»aa- 

laa aamnnalHda S»*' a« Ffooea at 4a«t 
la RMOda, .a ton* da|d pfoiioncia. 
^oar la «fdea 4a* daw* mnocent*. C«* 
Krtot, sdraoia* d da nambrawa* pa/- 
•ettitoUld* lacalaa, .ant raraana* *©»► 
.artat da Msnatara*. 

S' ARRONOI88EMENT 
Apr** OTolf lacwaUIl 6* n.mbrwi»*» 
aipMitHr** pour l«* Rosenberp at tod 
pbiaWort d*4«stloit> d I'omboaaoda 
da* Itota-UfriK In lacfiba du 5. |^- 
para pfoslcvr* raimloo* da quartiar* 
pear etlactloa 4a* ddlaput* d la Jaw- 
ota Matleiiata. 70 ooiaafo* 4a - 0»*<t 
at Ub*ft4 * *aat aandu* i4f«liara- 
. Rtpt. 


ta* praMian — ^ 

taHs paar la ia««rlptlaa, tM pl^.oa 
efoaatt ta prtpera, . 

ir ARRQHI>l88«li*NT ' 
ba 9r^n4 bat ai fas H * 
d Iffdtal Madarua a wiapnw* aa 
Mcads. rttMkara caatatoa*^ 

, «, P.rtW»*J- iSUL « 

vail paar la 5* Jaor wd a MaMaoala a*f 
•A prdparatioA. 

20* ARROWDlSStWIEW T 
Oa pramJar* »a*« W^ aa t 4 ^ f**** 
Ate* paar la *au**»l»tl*** 
rdonioAt 4a ^artiar •'< 
rtlactlan 4a» 441a««4«. 

•AONOLKT 

Taodli eaa la **«.» . 

^ da tfoaoll, alia alaat 4 *aaba M a tw 
•dean to dlHvtlaa da - Oiolt at 
Libartt *. 

livry-oargan 
U oa vanda rt oa lea pobltooa 
baa la dtowoeba 1 m*! 4 19 to, . 

MONTREUIL 

tn d a bar* da la criatlaa tfoa laaw 
pa da to* " — diftaiaiir*, to Mctlaa 
a-eitacba d «crplr *aa Caialt* •« 
aw# da la prapaiatiaa da to 9* Jaor- 

***** CLtRUONT-MRUAflO 
Natra aoil Chorla* Polont, tacfitaiw 
Mndral da MRAP. a #•», to 14 awtil, 
ana caatiraAea *ar la ta|at l • 04 
igat lot estltomltat F a 


dier les .'i.o'jcnr. financiers fndis- 
■ ri.^fre //;.*/.’ i?ns ae 
dS:.en/f:rc r:./!er‘f.i f .ri 
juir.. . 

AprVfl ;J.'iic.sc »a repfti- 

lition dt cen:le i<3 

oiiferentcs Hectior.Ss s^x. -iys cr 
organist ft in i. : n - ** - 

insist© .*ijv I- t.v-cS3iro .ic'.fca- 
iaer iJ. c:;.'ir'c;e de facon « 
pm«ri-.icr -jr temps leb 

mots d’orat:© jour 13^. Na- 

iionale. :V,\- •. ' 

< Si nvu^ ;uhi;:is praise 
comprehension ci d-: 00 line yo-, 
lontf, cor.clui-!J. noire sousenp^ 
lion riussira, Si noire souscrip- 
tion riussit, notre 5* fournfe 
Natiotiole temportera uff if«rfe.v 
ectatdnt- ft’ snis sOr qr.e nous 
rencontrerons pnrlout la com- 
prehension et la bonne volonte, * 

Lc discussion « 

to rtixulStsn Uas esux rapport* 
commanca annuiro ;’V •. ‘"tarvantto*^^ 
Sodawar (MsrttrauU), cua conenetar.t 
callat aa MOrtbawka (id'), 

(>•), Idtbtoato (.V:i»5.As), F*Aifrt*« 
(l4*l, C<a*»* (IS*) of robpin Tul* 
amn *ouli8ncf»T, an tiotmant 

tia norrityaijx tAumpic* contrat*. Qua » 
vowicription, poiJf arro tfuctueyia. doit 
dtra We ttroitamant 6 rtn«mote o# 
raetl^ ontifoctftc pooriuivia per la 
MRAP, dont o-.a ort partio inJtoran* 
to. 

landau (Momr»3i*.>) at AlfriKt Gami* 
lUr^ion c«w* SoCTttir* Juiva* do Fron- 
ca} teWfvlrtUtanr d 
montrar tti'll a*r *'ki vl*vo«r da ch«|ua 
m:titont id# a'insuot.a, r.a »a docu- 
inortar :o^i CetMtt >jr tow* to* pro- 
biamas, pouvo*r discutar ovae 

la* ontJrtcKto* da route* tandorrea* 
ot las ama.‘»ef w t'—'itr oon* Ja co^ 
oot coarmufi ;wniv& io o«‘.f,a at '.ei 
prdtuod* 

PuU Danbaui (» vt Il*aAban| 
(Strodwurg, Ini'.vterw »ur I'octtoo rrta> 
nda par :# MRAP contra la* disenmi- 
notion* qui freppartr la* troaoiUeur* 
nord-ofrlcoinf, (Et Yae4 ra^ cann^ 
de* meairo* crbltro»r«* prisa* d I a» 
gold da* crudionti d’outro-mer. no- 
tonunent cn cc c^t concerns I'oroo- 
nliotian co~p* do vaeoncas. 

tn quatque* mot*. CrrorSa* Patou# 
tire le* ccnclu**ori$ da* dtixit*. 

L'oppei pour to 5* Joorn4a Neti^ 
ndto (qi .0 nous rapfoduison* an pra- 
mlare pop*)- os? aipr* odoptd 4 I’uno- 
nimitd. 




.1. im.,t- 4> MlUl, »«»4 !• »«<*• " “*• **- l^ f*"* 

i.uviaat. par a» aoacto camptot. 

• ' _ 

Wttum^s Diationtii^ A, , 

tmbe 


l/c^a 1 .'tClii/ii lie;, 

ptrmis que des ^Iteients c.‘ rv- 
tente interviennent dans .a m- 
tuation Internationale. Le va*. . 
courant' d’opinion dive’.op^ie a. 
vue du triomphe de Pespril de 
nigociation sur tes soluiions dc 
force vient d’atooutsr t ur.c im- 
portante victoirc. II n’a pr.-; ;tl' 
pd^ible de traiter pa.- k rri.- 
pris les r^centes aroposition , ae 
TURSS et de la Chin^, 

La Paix est devenue »< J'iije- 
des discours d'hommes d’Etat et 
des tiditoriaux de toute ur.t pres- 
se. C'est bien une noavecutd 
pour quelques-ufis, puisqus. .V. 
Pierre Oaxotte, de TAcademlc 
Frangaise, nous apprend cettc 
” semaine Qti*lt ne sait quel fonc- 
tionnaire de fURSS a dit Vauire 
four que le comrnunisme et te 
capitalisme peuvent coexwter. 

O N conviendra que cettc 
coexistence pacitique a'est 
pas facilitec par ceiix qut 
^attribuent fesprif de coadliation 
^soviitique i la t politique de 
ferinet4 > des Etats^nis et qui 
en conclnent qu*il faut hdter le 
• riarmement aliemand ct intenai- 
fter la guerre en Indochine. 

1 a Si tel est le sens'rtel des 
\ propositions dn President Eisen- 
hower, ferit la Pravda du 25 


Cesb'w 

[v.e nouv’v, 

‘:i France, 

' DrA. W 

Mambro do i<i 

PorctattoRie <,tu <a. 
nr.n;., do io e*-r*. 

JLa paijt 
ieuir fait 

Vutci. relevdfS li.inn In prCFSi . 
cueiques-une-i dy-^ n* unions sik*.* 
ciiees par les U'C.utcs initiati- 
ves de rURfS er dr In Chine en 
TiiVeur dc ic i* • •> tn*'.inati«>- 
nale : 

AI>£N'AUER 


UOuest ded 






• ® • 


Voici guelqaes extraits jies 
discotirs prononeh puf 
Forge aax difffrentes foarnees 
Sat tonal es du MJf.A.P, : 

H ITI-ER nous dit qu’en en- 
seignant ranticommuniSF- 
me, on enaeigne en mtme' 
temps le m^pris dc I’honi- 
me et qu'en enseignant Tanti- 
sirnitisme, on enseigne encore 


Commenl nous pr6p«“»“» *® H !!®*® 2 

A- oatrt* po-r to* Sll 


Don* to codr* da la prdRaroStoA da 
to S« icontoa Notioaoia, da* ami* noo* 

OA* 4*M«Aa* : « CoiaMOOt «va»-oo«. 
ito oraHowinnoAt, dan* 1 * 14* to qo#*- 
tton hftoJMtota CMS ootio* fdoW* pofl- 
ttoa** f •. 

bMor to qtMrttiwtt •'«»# 7 i4o#a4i*. 

Ho«> o*OA*, to.aa'l*l« ramirfl ao* 
wtgeeoiaaftt* Itoonrtarv Dopai* 1* l.r 
faYriar, pla* do 95.000 #r. oot *t4 ro- 
wto oo MRAP. Cart doo* KoattoA oar- 
(oonanto 4a AOtr* .arttoA qua ta 

CDOCfit^ «•» fMUltOt* 

Neu* «* »om«.» po* d*» • tocbnl- 
ctoA* • do to so\!5ef*ptto» at a«w» 

•,'OYon* pos da *atrat. Ho«* oom* pM- 
tanren* a to RopalotioA da oo tto, y- 
ffOAdiftamont an odYar*atlwa rtoobw 
<lw ro*i*m*. da I'cntitomlttoAia, 4u a.- 

Afmant d'oaa W.brmaelit aaoto at *a- T^VrTimimiT^ pidinta*. 

YoadMrdo. toa #•«»•* Mot 4a to prtosiqttoA 4u moattof 

want Wt* ; ab)aetlTa»«if, #» na poiil Idm 4a to 


dhsoctof rotpaet fiooiwtor dn oatrt* 
aettoA* 4* aotia^ Moammoot. 

Nous o*o«» orRoaito troi* •doaca* 
dodaiatoqrapMqaPA ptooMir. ****a*- 
btoos popatobo*, oo* saqaatto, «» 
aiooHas poor to* R..wb « q, dt* com- 
aaofio* d* tlfaatum Roar to* R#^ 
baft, eoAtra to* oeeord. 4a So^ To**- 
ta* eo* otttoo* •* dSroolde* a*ae 
Mcedf , at AO* omto tot M 

plus aneoorot*® * •®®* •dvtoalr #1- 

fMOctoroiaanS. ^ , 

• La dIftattoA 4a « Ora*t * 

nottf oida 00**1 #oor«4**»t ; e'art 
MA* arm* pouf AOfr. combot at an 
So* tompT ««* "•®7« tneomporobto 

Sr^-tdc# dvo® «• popatoHao. 
lortQua not* wOkftoM t^oppol ftmw- 
<lar todi*poA*obto poor atta 
mitoda, to* oarttorv 
boutlqatort YOtaoiit moIrM to. 4*fl.- 


•i. mipris d. .'homme. et nous 

XSabtedfll^esd* 

publiques, wur KTSpyp p-p poUR CONJi)-"^' cisme. Ftntisdmitisrae et pour la 

aSI RFrTe MALHEUR. (Pf«mlhe.«. paix, 11 juin 1950.) 

rtS?=-^rde’le-so««,ie lea droitS 

11 cst.bicn connu quen Fran« ^g4(j.y ^ 

on sc retrouve toujours dans le _ . 

Apporter la v®nto .• 

N a qualifi6 de genocides , 
les tcrribles massacre 
qui, entre 1929 et 1^5, 
decimaieni des dixaines de mil-, 
pour to* Rosoaban, lions d'honimcs ct de 

Zai* l-a guerre que Ton nous pr^ 

menda po* on pafC pouf demain s’apparente 

facttoA da* otftoMi sf d a* d'extermination mas- 

t<b«* 4 d" give. 

Nous avon.s gardd le souvenir 
de nos dciiils, nous savons qua^ 
force de vouloir separer les uns 


sdfis 
M defense 
ne ifiit s’of- 

ntu eniente 

■ ,iu . luqnt 

^ If. ^ ticrre 
f72(f’! i ■ > 

SHEE 

It' ryif'’ *r 

U‘ ‘nit; . 
i> ..nlr. 

f 'A-V. '.C- 

/ 

•./;. 7;** 


r^'isr-^sss -S'- 

Roor to* ^ irM^iSo*- 

C***t OYO* **afloo*f *♦ OAthoasio^ 
mo qu* ««» pr^r^'!* ** er*"®* 

A cot *«*t, noiif 
minttHoas do 

ooua to. obl**tlK.df arfood»s.a- 

"*M*a* ¥*oto^ fai^"’*e 

4 « cott* JoorWf'bqt 4aWu*^ TUSl 
laot o Wo n 4 * ^ ■■ “*“* 

da MRAP. ."'-■f' 

J*MA8C|«I^ ^ 

lotidtRlrp d4 If. 


de touB les homines 

OUS sommes attemts. com- 
me yous, par les mauyaU 
scs odeufs de Tantisemi- 
ti.u’u* et par les mauvaiscs ac- 
tions du racisme. 

Oans le combat que vous me- 
nei, a chaque heure de la jour- 
n6e, vous entendez deinontrer 
qu’en aucun . cas, rhorame ne 
doit abdiquer sa dignite. qu’en 
aticun cas, it ne doit renr/ncer 
a respecter le dro)t, qu’en au- 
cun cas, il ne doit demeurer 


force de vouloir sepai^ lw uns 

des autres les i:_ o-.r lidien qui perniettrait, si vou-= 

tous lea pays — les hommes h nVtion 


hres de notre pays -- on sa- 
charne A paralyser la France 
pour la pr^ipiter dans im nou- 
veau malheur ct cela. les com-- 
battants de la Paix ct de la li- 
bel ti entendent I'cviter a tout 
prix... 

Et pour terminer, jc veux rap^ 
neler la parole d'un grand ami 
dw Juifs, I’abbi (Wfoire, qui 


.C'ur- 

Oc- 


n’etiez pas lA. si nous n’^liont^ 
pas 1^1, que Ton accepte le crinio 
qui risque d’engloiitir nos ge- 
nerations, Pour la defense d« la 
Paix, noua ne devons rien lais- 
ser pasjicr de cc qui corrompt 

^ • a _ 4^ raam4*_ 



Vwaiaa^ RV aaam.wa^— P ^ 1 i \ 

et pour U paix, 20 mai 1951.) 


fail Ur, d con.Uujt' 

(sic). CV*;) la v"“ 
jre it nous. 

< ..Mime df re 
au sujet des ci'rrj t 
apres un rtL'* 
cor hen, les cuf*.;7*t' 
d la continuut\yn 
jrpide s^raient i-a 

SYNGMM 

« Un riglemr-'" 
de Corhe qui 

vises serait c. y 
population < 
rnent oiix ** 

€ La Core i-: 
au moyen a \ 

Yalou. noti'r~ : 
septentrional 

TAGES SPIE rH, . 
nal d'Aller 
ddentaU. 

< Les rea n •’" 

'Antiques con^Uii 
ta plus etemfur • 
gerettsr qae Ir / 
rUnefter. dep:r^ 

ARRIBA/ io* 
quiste. 

< Une pur 
drait cn fa*! 

Moseoii. > 

LES AOTonrn; 
HiCAiNEy 
• VagaDce F £C ^ 

< i.es aufoniiS ii^'te}!’'n:r.e': 
semMent tri'^ affecty P*^r 
repercussions poysibU's ae It 
dcrnii're < of fens, ee de pmx i. 
soviitique. snr If ryrrnement c 
la difense dr I Occident. 

* La derniire scrie ;f. 
res conciliantes est cfn-cda, 
comme ant des p/£ < dangcrcM 
mameuvres visam d .<ipar> ♦ 
Etats^Unis de /i f* attics e' 
piens, > 


: I 


i-r* 

ne 


Vi 






t- 




)i| 


V 










r 




M. MASSON'OURSEL 


|^*pfMtt#UP A l*f£i;0>'» Q!}j i>t>bW«l>iZkUi4tt& POil^tVMSCOf 

Oireotoup wi> U !rvV<^> Pl^ii080?HiQU«. 


// 


II faut substitueir le bon 
vouloir au prejug6 


// 


«•« 


des 


MASSON'-Ol'USKL, Prof<jiiieur i TEcol® 
Iiauiej Ktydcs Ulrcoleur du la Hevue PhHnso- 

fjiiiqUt, a qi:l nolu dvafis* tlei'-t.';.-.'’!*'' ioii point de voe p»>i' 1«. 
ppobli’iii*.' <*‘1 2'<>ri>viijo i.'i il»' s <»!ui-s<:riiii jsfiu'i nous r^pond ■ 

I MP08g|frL£ 6k un ctvpttwn consoient d«^ne PM »8n4f«r 
daoc la JudATtme las oisQinas da *a foi> 

Ifflpoaatbla k un rm»oarna tnsipuii da soue-MtlmeP l*l»* 
larot ca pultsant o'>anpth#l«m« al ocnnata d*liradl« tpolaldma 
axpreaaion axploaiva da la fopvaup tiamitlquo. Pourtant, lQno> 
ranoa, ppijagdv panaunaa aana noblaaaa f^n% da la MMitar^ 
paM^ {• Mntpalpa da oa qy'ella f«t : uoa aynUidfa madl*- 
xr^Pfk 

^4ia aprda laa daohipdtnsn^ entpo QhPdUana, la Julf Spi- 
gMufla rAllamaon# da !*oAthou«iafma pomanilqua at 1* 
Fpanca <*'un railonallama plot* rioha qua calui da OMoaptaa. 
Ct 181 Sausuimana Jadia gaonapant k I'influanoa ocoideniala 
I'lnii^, rt^de, line partle da i& China at da I'inaulinde, La 
conalsta an ca qu'en pp^fdra la prdjugd au- bon vou- 
locr. La fOasa Malt molna p^ofond k I'Aga. ai pa|ioiaui» daa 
Gf^Sades. gian antandu pcP8onne» k pan . qualquaa dootaa, 
na tQUpOonna ca qua nos lottaino anoOtPaa ont dO aut 84- 
(tiitaa d'Kgypta at da MMopotamia. 


ie Professeur TAHON 


d^ambra da l*Acadimie da Modacina 


‘i^s Clique sociillhiiis les homines 

od ms flHiaes droiis ei les menus devoirs" 


Nous ttVoiiji rp?u, d’aufre pari, oc** quelqiiog lignes^dC 
Ur Loui.'i TANOX, de I’Acadv'uiic cle MtVlooirio : 

Voiia Rto dofhandaz un av;& aur iCs questions da paoitffi# 
at d'anUsam>i!e.rne. Ja considapt qua la question n*a paa 
baauooup « dtna discutba. Tous las hommas ont; an ppln- 
olpa, les dtamaa droits at las mSmaa davolra dans Im soolMba 
qui las oni ragus ou qui las ppotaqenL 


La presse mourrass/enne ;| Y|»ajs et 

iiii@ insulte alia 



r 


1^ )ai un ‘^mps ’ey. co-nm 
It'S revues pornogrop/ii;’ 
quts, les publications y/- 
chystes se voyaient inierdire 
tatfichage uux kiostfues d jour~ 
naux. Apr is l‘ agression aniise- 
mite des nervis maurrassiens en 
pleins Ckamps^Elysics, un de* 
cret tear enievu le Croii, pen- 
dant quelquts semaines, de crier 
tear Jeuille dans certains guar-- 
tiers... 

Ces teuips de restricihns 
(si minimei soieni-tlUs) sont ri- 
volus. 

Cesi an grand jourt mainte- 
nant, gue la presse injdme era- 
ctie 5e.i (ninlfes, souffle son po/- 
son raciste ua visage de la 
France. Les puhlicetiOfi- de hai- 
ne croissent ei se mult.pi:e::r. Et 
elles font preinY d’li// sans~ger.e 
gui i vogue les fours so mb res 
de f occupation. 

Aspects cc la France a Hi 
condamne en diffamation pour , 
avoir icrlt gue les faifs — et 
non pas- Hitler — ont provogue 
la drrm^re guerre. 

Ce mensonge reste pourlant 
son Ihime favori. Et le jour- 
nal, de Maurras afoute. avec la 
mime audace gue les Juifs sont 
responsables de toutes les futu- 
res jiuerres et de tous les snal- 
fteurs de rhumaniti. Cest ecrit 
noir sur blanc. : Les pires mal- 
heufs du inonde» et la rupture 
des MiuUtbres de force per.ibfe- 
ment atleints par les civilisa- 
tions de rOccident, ont rt«sque 
^ftujours eu pour cause accele- 
ratrice la dynamique juive, le 
mouvement singulier tt incontes- 
table de la nation juive rcbeile 
k la chrMientc (27-2 19J13). 


Le € bolchevisme >, ainsi gue 
ioute idee progressiste et de* 
mocratigue sont ivideinmenf 
juifs » pour les disciples de 


Gcebbels,^ et its ne vont pas par 
trente-six chemins pour taffir- 


irircat en 1951. Cette dirhiere 
jeaillc se reclame sans ye'rgp* 
gne du < socialismc-natidngt.^ 
et proclame gue cette doctrine, 
■amouflage transparent 


tional-socialisme > hitlinehL.e^i 


mer : La doctrine sovietique te dernier espoir de rBujfpe 

juive dans son origine-.. ,ljt pro*. ■ et de la race blanche 



FINALY 


Albert BE6«!A: 

" D6noncons 
tout regain de 
I'antis^mitisme^'^ 


Jules ISAAC : "Que justice soil foite 


II 


L'historien Jutes ISAAC, au- 
teur du livre Jwus et Israi‘1, 
nous adresse, en ccs termes, son 
point de vue sur 1‘affaire Finaly: 


Nous donnons ci-dessoas, avec 
Vautorisation de V auteur, guel- 
gues extraits d’un article de Al. 
Albert HEGUIN, dircciear de la 
revue Esprit : 


I i-t.i* r-in--«lor rl’.ThorH niir 


A U point ou nous en som- 
mes. on est en droit de 
craindre que toute action 
concilia trice ne soit vaine. Rien 
rt'indique. de la part des auto- 
riles eccicsiastiques, la vulontc 
.de tiU‘iT:c tin au scandale que 
constituent Tenlevement, le 
transfer! en Espagne et ta 84- 

rtnn« re mve rlf”! 


cassation n'etant pas suspenstf, 
cette attente m4me est une r4- 
vohe centre la loi ; e’est accep- 
ter que la justice fran^aise sqjt 
puhliquement bafouee par dn 
memhres du clergc, c**cyen8 
trancais. Ce'qui est ^;rnvc et met 
cn. cause tout le prooleaie des 
Tapports dc I'Eglise et rtc ri-iat, 
qu’il faudra examiner de 
veau, et a fond. --“L ‘ 

L'Eglise a eu grand tort dt 
laisser se dcvelopper une telle 
aventure, au m^pris des droits 

l#»« c'K'r.'*- n*. •••t.iilei 



Car Id riside le fond du wo* 
blime. Ces journaux metlenrte 
• racisme et Lantisernitisme^' au 
.vervice de « V Europe v, dt. J[an- 
iicommanisme le pi us fahatigue: 
xomnvnt poarraient-ils WreM’n- 
^terdits ators gu'its serven/, d 
bien des igards, I’idie de « Tar- 
' mie earopeenne >, et cerfains 
1 aspects essenticts de la poUti’ 
gue officielle? 

Certfs, les Fron{\d.%.dai}S U ur 
Ik^cosei.ihle, repousseni .anc me- 
pris.les appels de celte presse 


haine et de sang. Mah on ne 

#_ »*_ i 


^ saarait nier qifelle contribue 
jfcncoarager et a renforcer (es 
ennemis de ta Republique et de 
^'ta paix, nervis et polititiens. 
..Elle doi( done fire rom^Rue 
active me nl par les ripablieains 
^ unanimes, gui ont, tous unis, le 
pouvoir de ltd imposer silence. 



antiracistes 


L 


A iiWraiion ei '\& r^habllltatioh des m^dedns wvii- 
tiques injuatement accuses ; les poursultes engag^ca 
contre leurs accusateurs ; la. condamnation par la 
presse sovi4tlque de tout acte vlsant A snsciter la 
haino nationale ou. raclale, out doiind raison au BiRAPt 
qui nettait 'en garde Foplnioa publiquo contre tous ceux 
qui menaient une campagne tapageuse^ sur , un p^tendu 
antis^mitlsme en Union Sovidique. 


Pourtant, les caiomniatcurs 
de rURSS ne sc tiennent pas 
pour battus. lls cherchent k tai- 
re croire que la liberation des 
midecins leur a donne raison. 


PAR 


Albert YOUDINE 


Meinbr€. du Bureau Naiionat 
du. M.R.AIP. 


si 'un aventuricfj'tir 'Cnnemi du 
.regime agit dans c* sens d*une 
mani4re quelconque, ses tenia- 
tives sont trr4m4diablement 
vooees A I'Mhec : d4ma8qu4 aus- 
aitdt, son crime est puni conimt 
. un crime' contre I’Etat. . 


lls voudraient ‘ ainsi ' masquer.' 
letr d4faite gt fafre oublier leUfs- 
rnehsonges. ' 

Or, ils se trompent lourde^ 
ment s’ils esp4rent y parvenir. 
Les honn^tes geos se rendent 


N France, par contre, un 
Xavier Vallat, * responss- 
ble de ta mort de 120.000 
Juifs, se prom4ne librement. 
ecrit-- des articles, organise des 
^r4unions, et peut esp4rer, apr4s- 
le vote de la loi d’amnistie, re* 
devenir d4put4, voire ministre, 
k I’exerople de Bout4my.f'. 


compte, au^ourd’hui plus claire- 


ment que Jamals, que toute ex- 
citation k la hainc. raciale est.., 
o.clue en Union Sovi4tiqut. £t7 


' Charles Maurras. Hb4r4i a pu 
-*C(Hitlnuer .tranquillerocnt Sa bc- 
. aogne sanglante - d'excitation 
contre les Juifs, jusqu'B ce quit 
tneurej' dans soo lit- 

Les antis4mites.vichystd^ lea 
*~eV4cotants nazis des crimes ra- 


cistesr^ont r4habilixe8*. i'-; 
apris les aut res, tandis q»»e Ih 
presse ‘de haine raciaie po^i'suit 
ses campagnes inf Atr.cs. 

Aux Etais-Uni^, ie« Juifs. tl 
les NoifS sont les 4 ii^cls nu- 
m<ro I s, comme le *oullgne 
une. Made officiclie, rraduite en' 
France par ies servrCcS de doc: - 
metitalion du gouvernement. E? 
les Rosenberg, malgre les ?rii> 
ves de leur innocence, sont tuj- 
jours sous la menace oe la ctt& - 
se 41ectrique. 

En AngJeterre. la d4mcicfttie 
s'accommode fort, bien des bapr 
des.de Moftley, qui a;taquem 4t 
pilicnt les 9ynagOgut*^. 

Quant aux ixwjrresux 
d'AuschwltZ, ils sont r^atmen 
sous le couvert de i»trm4e eti- 
rop^rme. . 

QbI, les honnlW q-.e V. 

. voulaif, exciter 
Sov;4tique, qgiL'l ' ‘ 

• conUe^ le MRAr .f *M 
nant la comparaiadk*) c. .liir V, * :* 
conclusions qui 


OmHm maurras 


gressisme de Roosevelt 4tait na- 
turellement anim4, habit4 par les 
inteiiectuels juifs (16-1-1953). 

tsoler les Juifs pour diviser la 
. nation afin de mteax ta mattrir. 
ser ; prisenter comme le pro- 
blime central de t‘histoire texis^ 

' tence deS Jtiifs, afin de masquer 
la latte entre les forces de rioc- 
tioh et de progres ; rendre Its 
Juifs coupahles de tous les maux 
pour diseal per les viri tables 
crimineU, tel a toujoars Hi, tel 
reste ti rdte de tantisimitisme 
Avec df faibtes variations, Ri- 
varpl/ Ecrlts de Paris,. La Vic- 
toire, elc., diveloppent ces mi- 
mes tbiines. Mais il }aat. une 
"'ptentlian^particuliire d deux nou- 
veaujcPyeJias: Q^iense de- rOcci- 
par Maurice Bardi- 
che, appiagistt des camps de la 
'mort':rlH\fidH\ii» or gone du 
€ MouvjtiJteni National Citih 




deUe »'- ’grbgpant les gangsters 
antisigilteslftii pjastic gui sillus- 










VEJKCORS La preuve est faite 
y ■ que l^ibtisemilism est impossible 
r dans i§s pays du socialisme.7* 




. M:<: Vercor5f prisde'nl du Co- sonnes qui; pourtspt,' puraient 
miti National des Etriydins a eu bien des raison^ de me 
prononci, J la riceate'iisseijibtee ' comprendre, sont lA pour me 




yicHy 

fi *l?**l^ ■•nklMM o«» 


L ipw'l* *Hinr**% «»f •* 

M R Ai t li WMT iMir fcottiktA 




ginirale de cette orgqn/ialion, 
un important diseoars.^ ptihlii 
par les Lett res Fran^ajsJ^,' ou 
' it fit justice des cariijm’gner de ' 
calomnie dirigies cofitriLXJ^'^^^ 
el les democratits popclgireS’ H 
a df’dari notamnient 4 *- 

.-.Nous sommes 'd48onnai| en 
possession de tous les dl^^wnts 
‘pour nous faire une opin|Q{l''$in- 
c4re, exacte. et sans partt ptis. 
Puisque si certains d'cntmlpous 
' ont pu nourrir des inqui4tt^^ 

' devant certains faits 
-raciste, survenus dans ,1^ ' re- 
'ptibliqies socialistes, ces'jnqui^- 
'tudes, i’article de'la Prgvdq'les- 
’a maintenant dissip4eskj .,r 
A supposer que ces fal^ re^ 
'levassent T4eHement d^*' Senti- 
ments antisfmites e'est le gou- 
vernement m4me de I'UKSS, 


rassurer. Comme aussi les re- 
fus obstin^s du Figaro litteraire 
de me permettre de m'adrtsser 
A SM lecteurs pour r4tablir les 
faits dans leur veritable jour. 
Refus que son r4dacteur en chef 
accompagnait de lettres de plus 
en plus inmiltantes k mesure 
qu'ils etaient plus diffkiles h 
justifier dans la toute simple 


h'ont jamais adihis que le rs- 
cisme pouvait victorieusement 
.fleurir en pays communiste ! 
Nous Spmmes d4shonor4s parce 
qu’au lieu de les condamner en 
Mermes tonitruants, nous * pous 
sommes content4s d'inviter so- 
* lentlellement — ce qui ne man- 
. ' quait pas. poisrtant, de pr4somp- 
.tion — les gouvcrncments des 
pays oil la loi punit Tantis^mi- 
' tisme a veiiier 4 ce qu’eile s’ap- 
pFque. La Pravda, r4pondant 4 


honn(Het6. Le bouquet, vous le ** not:e confiance, nous fait 4cho, 


connaissez : e’est le triomphe de 
ces gens-U avec Tarticte de la 
Pravda. Nous void, parail-il, 
tous d4shonor4s parce qt:e la 
Pravda donne raison 4 ceua qui 


alors nous voilA deshonords.. Je 
plains le chien, s'il existe,. du 
r4dacteur en chef du Figaro lit- 
tiraire : on saura tr4s bien le 
noyer.. 


apres le president mdme de la 
^R4pubi;que tch^coslova'qnV dni 
^•les ont condamn4s, ced senti- 
ments, sans Equivoque. 


■?? 


Les .commentalres 

de lo presse sovietique 


La ri-habUllaUon de^ mt^declns* 


.Oe pareilt aciea - erinunelt 


A U cours .de " ^ 
grfe beliiCfetl 
s^miiisme en - 
dirigeants de U Ft *. ..at'A - 
mste de France, le.^ air>e‘ 
de la LIcfl, Bernard U-.a.nc 
t4te, les journalistefi ct ■'"* 
Tireur et du populaire 
ptiticulfereipv* t disiit 
se sont h4t4- v^'organiir 
.Mutualke, so b protec 
la police, un meeting oe 
testation •* ou i s tt. •» 
tea emuies des pires exc* iteun. 
k la haine. 

comme # 
agr-^. n'av 
rlefense c 
ni avec 
m'llsme. 

; pret.-' de de 
•-i>r au ctn;- 
pagne's antiec^‘K!^qu•i. p Ap- 
po-.eer one cotltriF- ; or A V- 
guerrefroide. > 

Cor si la lufte contre I - r * 
.mitdjme et Ic ractsme \t 
ressait vraimeot, 
quaient pas d'occa. 
prouver, et ct, depui , iui- -tempa 
d4j4. . . . 

A la liberation' de Xari t Vai- 
fat, e'est le MRAP qui o ginma 
dans le pays 1<S meetiros, les 
delegations, les profesUFons de 
toutes sortes-’ Eux ctair »1 , >- 
seats. 

Contre rex4ct*tlon des "ep; oe 
Martinsville et de Willie .-VS - .f 
e'est le MRAP encore gu- a rr.,- - 
n6 I’aciion. Eux etaient sbsents 
II est vtai qu'apres I’exxutirn 
dc McGee,, la .L'ica, qoi s'etao 
tue lusqu'alors, a <* j *•? f^ntamc 


Ui 


ran. 

- soni 
:S. .. . 

4 la 

m oe 
, p/o- 

t fail 


Ce meeting 
toute leur cr 
k voir avc," 
decins hi. : - 
contre 
fut pour w 
plus pour 


lltani 

.1 r!*:l 
A n c- 
, is; 

2il 




\ I 






1 . -t .v‘- Nous 

‘ loi ui-n Etat >aic. Trop 
*Ue Chretiens - Tafiaire 
tre bicn — ooi-.^dcrenl leite > * 
luation conime u? 
fora*. *:t Ft cru*v • .iutor^ > ^ 
la « vurner » . v »*s 
que Chose pai .r possible.- 

IJm irret »:.e justice ote eii- 
lants Finaly h la tuielle de Mile 
brun pour les donner a leuj ta- 
ipillt 05 infants doivtni done 
itre r-f^trouvis.,. 

oi'Cstion- ■ primitive s est 
com'^- QUite Uu fait de la d^ 0 “ 
U^vv;;nce aiix lois, de ! enlfeve- 
aSenf mensonge. Noo» de- 

vi;n< d^i'Jiyer lout prttexte don - 1 

rr* i d’ant!^crn^t^3me... | 

A Id d’extr^me-urotte, 

qoi cheraV. :i exploiter raffa'f* 
4 ans un ‘xns an|tscmite, » faot 
T^pondre i>.tr le rappel de ces 
iiijncs de I con Bloy : * Lant> 
s^ Tiitisme eft le souffle! !c plus 
. t-l V que Notre-Scigneiar ait 
a Passion qui dure 
. ^t le plus impar- 
n irce Qu’il Ic res'oit 
te sa AUre ct de la 
des Chretiens... 


iiirc oour laiKici » ii eai 


ae cassauon. qui csi suisie ac pour i a. , i. ^ 

Taffaire? Mais le pourvot en temps * le dira-t-elle? 


L’Amitie Judio-ChrUitane: 


✓ / 


De telles pratiques 
devraient ^tre impensables 


Al. Edmond FLEG, d qui nous 
avons demandi igalement son 
opinion sur Caffaire Finaly, nous 
iransmei une dictaration du Co- 
Central de tAmitie jadio- 
Chrelicnne dont il est I'un des 
fO-sZ/j/iofflires. En void It texte: 


L KS membxes soussign^ du 
Comitc Central de 1 
tie Jud^Chretienne, reu* 
n-8 le 26 mars 1953 et agissani 
te-qualit^i plus que jamais at- 

« s. a rrt44«^ tllu^ fltifi 


taciiS i cette amitic plus que 
1icla 


e des bicn-pensants 
lorsquc, une fois 
iissimulent les mo- : 
lels de leur partUu- ; 
ieuK sous les faux- ‘ 
’un palrlotisme de 
De mfcme qu'on 
ontinuitc de I'edu- 
icf k ces enfants et 
m^me temps, on les 
college en college, 
ntitfa variables, de 
.leuf carder soi-di- 
Uiohalil^ francaise, 

; rien de mieux que 
aasser a I'^trangcf I 
Etat Stranger dont 
la haute protection 
- • - • fi'imporie quel Etat. 

lEspagne de Franco, tout 
heu.'euRC de prendre la defease 
dt 'h Tiben.^ des chr^tiena 
SpiritaelUmeni \e destin dei 
cej».ceux enfants peut &trc f^| 
cond ‘ avec la grace de Dicu. 
it •>os.siblc qu'lls atteignent 
A une Vauteur ou, mysUrieuse- 
rnen., * 5 '(oncilieront dans leur 
a-eiSLi?!' - -e meilleur des deuoc 
-^millcs st ritucUea auxquelles 
.it'sormais ils appartiennenr, el 
c.y'tn aux se renouvelle I'Union 
.'cc Testaments:.. . 

Qua.-, .\ .:ou 8 , a I’iut^rieur del 
rEc^*’'” c respectant le rj-thmej 
de sr. •'■.arche dans le temps. 

sonimes libre?; de souhaiier 
que ia pri'sente tragWie inau- 
”ure ur'c* .touvelle reflexion : 
fdN.-e i ’d. lointaine 6 cheance, 
Ic-it dvit ■ - ^ mis en cruvre pour 
ere r’ rte ni de loin on ne 
songe px. jamais k faire des 
rhr^tie»is de force. Nu! ne peul 
drame solt non ad- 
T'-'h i: est permis d'esp^ 
7 .'* ciuun i:mps viendra on il 
. {•* «'r 3 r'us surgir d’ affai- 
••y : ; non pss seulemfint 
on*- Vifce restern k !a loi 
. .-.ia c^ese a la iois r-tce^ 
• ■?“' insuffisante — mais 

■y • c j ^ e 5 ch r^tier,?, insi ruits 

v.:.r\irieace prusente, ne re- 
... 'r'Tr.i pas le? raSjn.s? im- 
xu 



«» 0 <r«U riNAlY 


janiais n^essaire, dicta rent : 

I. Le baptC-me administrc a 
des enfants centre la volontc de 
.'teurs parents constituc une at- 
• teinte esaentiellement condamna- 
ble aux droits de la famille 
comme de la personne humaine. 
et ne justifie aucune mainmise 
.sur de ids baptUis ; 

’ 2. U chaine des comphcitis 

- erftce auxqucUes les enlants ain- 
8 i babtisis ont ete soustraits a 
leur famine naturelle et conduits 
au dela des frontieres franqaises 
. aurait du provoquer la reproba- 
tion universcUe ; . • . 

3 . Toutes mesurcs devraient 
Wre prises par toutes les auto- 
rites compitentes, tant religleu- 
ses que civiles, pour cue les 
fants soient rendus a leur fa- 
mine. san* aucune condition 
. prialable^ ct que de telles pra- 
tiques deviennent d^sormais im- 
possibles, ef nieme in^nsable^ 

Jacque MADAULt, . pffoi- 
' ; dent, catholique ; 

Edmond FLEG. yice-prtsident. 
Israelite ; 

Pasteur LAIJRIOL, vice-^jrbsi- 
dent, protestant ; 

L. ZANDER, vice-prteident, 
‘ orthodoxe. 


^UMacitaiaS •» S“* r*e#M**S* tw- 
lommM* 4 m 

mant U$ Prptocote* d«* 

3* * 

qupl, Ucteuf*. vou» m* da- 

^'un ': Ki' ffcafta '<Xi *8 Brumoira . 
qUond Ip. mickicin* •»! impulttonte, 
to chirufflis 

xoop 4* toon 

A«pect» ft Cq Vktoit. 

oWfMMt ^ 8 • *•••' “♦‘- 

ygt^ pour l« condidot* fiotit- 

litte ! Wiu# If CfBebo Troebo, 
fSoiUo Vd tf^Us®* 

kncf' fUkWlIf enfrf If* 

• lii^opfa Of OffOf ft ffUf* df 

Nm> C^tVffi FW It* «*»•• df Sort* 

Ml Cfrtfta fMdiff 4f •al-diMft • f f- 

dengm 5 aul if tfft UhittrA* ^olnt** 
foi* pf«’"l|J^jr«*H*"f *•*•* frt>*e* 

MlHwilp.l$Hfat: pm fMMplf * 
TAITTIHGIK, 40* df •Of pim. If 
livfrtnilfr IfSneiWo ; J.«i-UmI* Vl. 
GtCI. ff r«f ctfr ff cbf# 4m 
que. If Vmmm\ qui ffbUf •« t*47 fiM 
*ni|ii*ff CM > lo mfdMiff ffVfblf por 
IM MMqoM . ; Roffr SIMIT, mciff 
WfHff S5, outfor d'uf# Thiorif Ou 
rociune *b«» d'f* #reiipf df ff*-, 
vl* qui fttoqubfift oo plosHc If* mo- J 
qatliu ot lo* domeufot do* iult*— ^ 
Dob* I«* eo» ou fo •• 
pos dM bMBftf* do molf oMil coroc- 
tdHtO*, I** loMfou* fUhyito* oppfi* 
tsHt dvMomofit d voOor poM Its ««ii- 
dWfh quo p ft TO—* lo cof^'Nfoy- 

Lo Fittiwo f fdpondu d coC'fppflc* 
KUO m lo«0«d dm porto* idvim ou* 
fcommo* do Vkby at do If rOactloa. d 
•loM* proOoctwtr*. d loff* tmlOf «t d 
toff* eeiRpUcot. 


sures ahtis^ites ; ceia nest ni 
possible ni concevablc pour un 
Etat vraiment communists, ceux 
qui Tont toujours su et toujours 
dit ont re^u la plus .dclatante 
des confirmations.., 
jc suis de ceux qui n’ont pas 
acceptd de croire sans preuves 
que les Rdpublique socialistea 
pussent d^choir au point d’adop- 
ter I’erreur immonde du racis- 
<ne. Pourtant la scule cramte 
uue cela ffit simplement possi- 
ble — et les mots « d’ongine 
juiv£ > poiflvsicnt sutoriscr cct* 
le crainte — me poussait a m as- 
. socier au d^ir manifesre par 
Serge Oroussard d’en discuter 
avec nos camarades communi^ 

• tes. k condition que ce qu il 
sirait fht sincerement la lumiere 
entre nous. Et jc le lui a» dit. 
Mais jc lui ai dit aussi que sil 
continwait d’exiger, non une dis- 
cussion impartvale, mais que sa 
condamnation violente fOt imme- 
diatement mise aux voix, et a 
moins qu'il n'apportdt les preu- 
. yes i neon tes tables qu’il preten^- 
odait -avoir, je proposerms aw 
Comitd direcleur de s'y oppo- 
ser... ^ ^ ^ 

. Heureusement — . et toutes 
proportions garddes I — Texem- 
ple des avatars d’un Remain 
Rotland « au-dessus de la 
», comme aussi quelques te- 
moignages trfes pr^cieux de per- 


juaiu.i' 


_ Dfs dvanlupier* mdprisabids 
du type d# RIoumIno ont ottaydi 
par one enqudta truqudf, d’aUi- 
•oe dans In socldU aovidtiquf, 
unio monlement et politique- 
ment per lee Iddti de I’Inlerna- 
tionallamf proieterlen,,doa een- 
tlmente de haine netlonaia pr<^ 
fodement noetilee d I'lddologio 
soviftiquo. 


k.-tllt* i»« »wt,» 

liU et de leurt fonctione, ceua 
qui ont rfooure d Parbilraire. 

(PUAVDA, Cl avril 1*1 .*>.'1.. 


Le Proiessnur HADAiniiiiD: 


“Comparez avec 
I’affairc Dreyfus”. 


M. )** Pro!'isst‘ii:- Jacques Ha- 
daiiiaiU. lueiv.'ore Ge rinstlluli 
ri^pondant. Ic aviIL d une eu- 
quCte du Figaro a d^clari : 

II n'y a pat de noovelle 
oHenUtion de la politique eo- 
vlettque. 0*ett toujours le md- 
me,,, . 

Sn to qui concerns Pdptloouo 
du « complot dee blouses bien- 
Ghee », permeHex-p^ de vouo 
rdpondpo pdf le bende, II e'est 
pasad une affaire analogue en 
Franco et un innocent eat reetd 
cinq eni en prison j lo pey® • dtd 
mis d feu et d sano QU* 
le gouvernement ne voulaJt pee 
psconrialtre son erreur 


• La Oonetiiution eovietique 
defMd rogailtd dee drotu/de 
toua lee citoyens, fnddpendem- 
ment de leur natlonaliid ou de 
leur .race, et dene toua i*s do* 
maines de la vie dconomique, 
culturelle, aociaJe et politique. 

Toute limiiatioiii directs ou In- 
dirocte des droKs ou. a‘j con- 
traire, tout octroi de privlldges 
on re Ison de Tap parte nance ra- 
oiale des citoyena, alnsi que tou- 
te propaganda de dieo^mlnaiion 
raoldle ou netlonalf sent bennis 
per le loi 




la bataille contre la liberation 
de A\aurras, contre la* presse 
antisdmite, comme iU .. sont 


et rangers a la 


...Dana tea paya capitalistes. ou 
Pon va d rencontre de ce* prin- 
oipee, lee rdeotlonneirc* qui ex* 
ploltent le cleate ouvridre susci* 
tent doe helnea natlonalisies en 
propegeent le cheuviniims et la 
diaorlminetion reciale. Le* pays 
du todeileme, eux, ddveioppent 
riddo de Pegelitd entre ie« peu- 
plaa. (PILWD.N, 7 aviil 1953.) 


'RivaroV\conlre le sens de VHistoire 


\ 


* II y a encore, heureusement, s 
quelques Dr Malan de par le 
monde, pour se met Ire en tra- 
vers... du trop fameux « seris 
de I'Hlstolre • ! lU y lalsseront ; 
peul-^tre leur peau„.maJ8 nou 
leur couleup. » . *, 

Ainsl a'exiHmo ^ Hivarol.. qui, 


aaluen; la viclolre des rsclatea 
aux floctlona sud-africaines, on 
ppofite pour exciter au racismo, 
en France, contro les dtodlanta 
d'outre-mer. 

* Au Ouartler Latin, dcNt la 
fauMlo viohyste, .les s^dentaires 
changent d'avis ; Ils onl com- 


LES CRIS DE HAINE. DES. RACISTES 

*' ■ ■*— ' ... 1 .... r.... ..A,i iuA el rn R<*fi.n<lale 


A L*HIURB qk noua mattona 
toua proaaa, dea ddpdohea 
annonceni la prochain ro- 
lour en Franca des enfmito Fi- 
naly. Ce n'est pea ’a premidro 
fois, et Hon no pownet do croiro 
quo cetu affaire rocevra dan* 
rimmddlat und aolutlon satlsfai- 
aante. 


L’atUtudo d*ui»e partia du 
Hergd oathOlIque, ddflant la Jua- 
t*ce frangalae, 4a passivltd dea 
pouvoira publics, Incapablea do 
t^soudna oo iprobldmo, ont po^ 
mla lo ddchalnomont dana lo 
pays do vioicntos campagot* an* 
tledmttea* 


Lfi collabo Ybamdgaray a don- 
nd lo ton avoo a® upageuao pro- 
clamation ; Allons-nous accep- 
tor fjuo des Julfs et la presse 
A lOTT solde Insultent et pour- 
su vci’t de leur Ual:*o des relU 
glcu.v cl des prilrc* ?... Aliens-. 
U!>v.«i cccepler, en un mol, 
SU'lsraei fasce io| dang doUf 


gouvernement, notre Assembloo 
et nos prCtoires ? 

Kn fait, le gouverntmonl ot lee- 
autoritde Judioiairea n'ont pas 
pdagi 4 de telles Ignominies, ot 
tout 10 paiso oommo el la lot 
dtaK falto pour Ybamdgaray at 
aes paralls. 

iliviirol, Aspects do la France,- 
La Vlctolre, Ecrlts de Paris, oto. 

■ ont bruyammoot applaucN 4 cea 
provocations. Et ils consaceent 
4 I'affairo do$ oolonnes el des 
oolonnea do calomoiec, viaant 4 
dresaar t*opinlon contro 
. JttlfS. 

Lfur mdthccs 7 Identiflor aux 
duifs la Juatioo frangalso et toua 
las Frangaia qui rdclament Jus- 
tice ; oHer, pour falra diveraicn, 

au raclsme des Julfs. 


Nous ne pouvons accepter 

dorit a La Viotoira s, qu’il y ai; 


cUex nous des gens qub-proll- 

. . 


OdndruHsant leurs conclusions, 
las feulllea Inflir.s* dtaleni lar- 
gement ler thtmes olassiquas da 
PantlsdmIlUmo : vn avail rare- 
ment vu la halna so donner 
qourt 4tf08l Mbfpmwti _ 


lent de la cltoyenii^fd^r^gaiso 
el qui se rdv&lent dtre 4 lout 
propos^ JuUs avant tout. 

Aspects de la France qui res- 
aopt, 4 Focoaslon, lo alogan de la 
double natlonaliid doe Julfa, pu- 
blie les meneoos lanodOi eux 
^ Juifs per le gauiUsVe Rdmy : il 
.n’y aura plus en.. France de 
« Mademoiselle Brun * pour, 
dans des circonstances «;emhla- 
b!es a celles quo nous avons 
corinues. et qui PEUVENV PORT 
BIE.N SE REPRESENTER DE- 
MAIN, remplacer dans sa chs- 
rltd I’admlrable femme qu’ot^ a 
jetde en prison... 

L'eppel au pogrom . ast 4 
paino caoh4, do m4mo quf dans 
oos.autres phrasas d’AspecU do 
!a Prunce : NoUs. avons affairs 
Itosillllds ddcluries... * 
. t^tjflhfnesurd quelle seralt la rO- 
• Lg* consclenca i\aU> 


nale francaise, si ce scandale 
(la justice, R.O.L«R») dtalt con- 

foinuid ? i ■' .1 

“ guant 4 Rivarol, II par|t dot 
provocations racistes des enne- 
mls de TEgllsc at^ 
qu'un raclsme dlran^ec aussi 
Insolent ne dolt, pas'avolf dro.'t 
do clW en France. 

Co fopide dobanillipnnaga 
montra assai au#llo_axp!Lo|t*Won 
a pu faJre la preaxo fg^allsde. 
d’uno affaire quf n»aurWt f as 
dd quitter lo lerrarn Jy.^aire, 
St O!) U oat fait si pduVilo rac 
des dfolts do I’onfanVffourcc- 
oamenL oes hommrt d»‘ toutes 
religions, c?e toutd# "[^endanco* 
ont pHe v'.;c»ureuse*^Ol posi- 
tion cont^ocer^r .(^n lon- 

iatWee d’empolsohn’fr, .ItF'mo- 
eohd''»». Walo quo da ten- 

utlvrs aient pu 

vrait too* qgpi 'do qu> 

ddpend, aujourd*huij 'una Juste 
C'jlutior,, a prouver pa^jOF «cte5 
4 IU-',!* tniendeni coupe?, ©pun 4 
CdUa honiOMig P.f?PI!i4h^®t 


ps Js qu’lls avalent de ia inaln- 
d’esuvre en surn'-’inbro dans cet 
auport boursler de i'oiMre-mor : 
laiseurs de ballels bouguy-wou- 
gii\ et d’aiiges mulls, soute- 
neurs, eari-inuluelUsles aclmr- 
nC^, poctes'senghorlens, 4 I’af- 
fftl vralnient de lout ce qui 
r**amene pas do cal- dans- le 
creux de melr. s 


Cos tgnobiec oaSomnJos, dans 
un Etyls qui rappolte colui du 
Sturnvjr donongani la • n4gflfl- 
catlon s 06 la FrenM, ont on 
objectif bien ddlermind. • Ellea 
contHbuent 4 la campagna qui 
vita a pH'^er do leurs bourses 
la majoritd des atudients d»ou- 
tre-mer, dont *«• dludee, pour- 
unL donnont lea rdsulteta les 
plus satisfeisanu. II s’aglt, con- 
tie le sens de riilslolre, prda- 
atment, do dresser des dtu- 
diants blancs contre leurs ce- 
marades de coulour et, en ddfl- 
nitWo, d'empdeher les peuples 
Golontau s de s'inxtruire, do 
prouver* cu'ils sent lea egeux da 
toce toe peupleft. 


C'et*. •ys owe itouilgne Hivarol 
dam; ■^r. outre artltie, loraqu’ll 
denonca les ravr.pefi ale I’huina- 
iii-tarisine, abouti 4 la 

ouev'esrlc*" de !‘etctavag6» 


:..;l ;.*.ud’nnt8 el tous les dd- 
rrocret^i ont cy. ddj4 rdpondra 
4 de le’-ee provocellont. lit y 
rApondront oncoro et eauront 

fair© *At7o P.'*''-!.'; el esm- 
b!&b!flV . 


• La Constitution sovisUquo, 
fonddo sur leo principss du so- 
oislismo... accord# d tous les 
peuples qui vivent en Union Bo- 
vietlque, dee droits idonilques 
dens toutes les sphdres de le via 
doonomlque, administrative, cul- 
turello, soelala ot polltiquOM. 

En UR88,* tous les citoyens 
Jouissent do droiu egeux. Ce ne 
aont ni le aiUietiqp de fortune, 
nl Foriglno nailonale, ni le sexe, 
nl lo reng, mela lea capaciUi* 
paraonnellea et te tre veil person- 
nel de cheque cRoyer. oul ddtor- 
mlftont so elation dans notro 
aooidtd^. 


Los drofU clvlqueo et K- 
portda do I'hommo sovietiquo 
ne sent pas seulemant ©vec’s- 
mds par ta Constitution de notre 
Etet ; Us sent euexi sotidement 
garantia par la loi at px? loole 
Porganisation do notro vie so- 
sootaliato- (IZVESTJA, 9 avrti 
1053.) 


gne da ijeuplc' ^^id -w 

tout les-. peuplot 'en. AMw 
d'Ethel et Juliuj^'.RqdtnhJ^j^^' 

Fcuilleiez ' la. 
ltd lrouVerei*pd^>^'8*i^°® 
cas, un aeid, iriottffig.'pf 
ble n celui du'ils, .ont\ (y ;j • pbgf 
calomnior l’Uni<^>M>yTpt.quec.w 
toujouro, ils‘,« sent 
partidpfci' aux, Jb£Wn.6ei Ndtior 
nates contre lfi racism^' 
tisemitisnie Id 

AIRAP, sans pour odb p’^gapiaw 
eux-m4mes df 

nKcstations. ij • J ' f •*'< 

L e MRAP ppdpare-ii^oiixU 
d’hui .la V.'joumfc Ndtibi- 
nalc contre le ;'4cta^, 
I’antisemitisme et pour la Pafx. 
Comme les ahndes prdr.^dqiitp, 
et plus encore, ce aera o '* poll” 
sarttfi manifestation d’u.iitd.' dtt* 
tlraciste. Le peuple de Fraftge, 
par des centainea et de? centgl- 
nes de ddl^guds, venus des Usf- 
n” et des bureaux, dea vkotet et 

des ■ universitds.-'Clamerr. 'sa 

lome de voir la hatnt ”aa4!e 
bannie a jamaia. . / ' . 

Comme chaque annfe. .le 
MRAP a’adreasera a toutes l» 
organisations . tt aasotiatioro 
sans distinction, pour lea idinttr 
4 panic! per a cette pmssdme 
manifestation antifachte. . 

Ce sera, pour toua lea hopw* 
tes gens, pour toua lea: antiff- 
cistea Rinceres,' Toccasjon ^ 
retrouver ensemble darts 
lion contre la propagandr ^ 
date et anti 5 «m:te epntre m . 1 ^ 
b^ratioD dea coliabos, ■conirb^lE 
rtp.rmcmcnt . des nazis, poqr ..U 
liberation dfis Rosfinbe'tif et pouf 

f^i% ce sera.en m^me tiwflpA 
one occasion -d’arraclKr leuf 
masque 2 ’j:< faux anljramttM, 
aux fa’JX adversaires; de 
s^mit^sme, 4 ceux qui^ unfi iw* 
de olu.'i- se mettront Jut baif.^e 
la Franro antiraciste*. 



Charles SERRE 


i 


-'i# 

I 






L . >• V-'-jC .. 


C'*«i •«**{•» QM* 

entiroxlct** fBf "*o*f »f»bOf 

a rdof 4* 57. o«». 

S«rtt, oficifB O'Oreii, aacfd* 

tfir* Of Ib Ffdf*aHo« NotifBfl* Of*" 
Oiport^ of IniBfiii* Ff- 

trietvk {FMDJRP;, mtiwbr* CfMlF# 
Iifcutit Of le F«Ofsrt*« iBlvrsstls* 
Mflf Ob* * 

M. Ckarif* Uf *W»I. om m rif 4 
iBo^Btfs r«oW«*s 4 Vottimm Oo M4AF* 

Jl oYoiS ft** pctvkBtifY# tfie. ee rs* 
*^orovf fiipoif 0 If- CfffdaSMe 
tr’iii" If rfo4 iB * wf Ht Of fAlliPfeie*, ^ 
or{*4<u<ff If 15 IMl yev, 

MeovfBian*. 

• Ofoif LibsrM f • rubU* 0# fcOif- 
htmvT, r»tUJ*» .Of M» CRfAf* Sen^ 
*wf 'HrfMff an dftf OOnonffb *• mpm 
plot qui viif d racor.trtiufr enS Web** 
■MCht tlQXlf ft MVOACiMrdf. 

L* MRAP a oOrftM U PHWEF; 
«• BMtaaof Of coAfoUesM* 'et df' 
f -*»fmft!f . •silOorlfd* 





OnOtT ST 










Un oppei du comite de defense : 

RENFORCEZt 


Gfeengiass avoue 


qu’ij 


a menti 


la protestation ! 



|)e n«>uvenUx <MeiT»fnts .stir,: 
viMius, ces icmps dcrniei^. 
rtnforcer Tivec eclat la- 
dc rinnoctnee d’Ethcl ct Ju- 
lius Uosenberg : publicaiio;. 
d'uti texte nianuscrit dc 
(Jteen}{laM, principal teitiojn 
d charye, reconnaissant le ca- 
ractere mer.songer ue sa dc- 
posiiion ; dcyoiA'cnt* d'une 
table qui avail iitc pre-senfee 
faussement par I’accusation, 
conime piK'e a conviction. 

Cv!i faitk ^oni un ^ratid 
rncourfl(?t!nvnt pour Its de- 
fenseur^ d<^7 l<u«nbtrg. 

l.e Vomitv Franv'aU de Ue- 
tense (ks Kwienberg lance 
*in app^ snlennel *0 tous lea. 
Franvais t*j)r‘a de justice, a 


•.:us ;:eu.s de cocur, poiir 

vp»c d;.).s les jours dui y.en- 
neni, jnultiplient lea prO- 

testailofts. les pdtitions, lea 
delcpali-.dS aepr^ de I'arti- 
bassadc t‘i dea conaulat* dea 
Eia:a-lh»is- 

La protestation de I opi- 
• niort rounJiale cat parvenoe 
iiijiqu’ii present a eitip^htf. 
i i'xeeiaiun des deux inno- 
cents. 

II esi pcsaible, en ponraui- 
vani et vii intensifiant nos cN 
forts. Uv fairt triompher d4- 
(ibitivement Iq justice. 

Lt COMITE FRANCAIS 
DEFENSE^ v 
l)P,S ROSENBERG. 


\\ 

1 


‘ :»• lllri* t « Coup dc thcA- 

t»*# dans rnftal.'o Rosenberg 7 » 
Se jtMiruul CotnlMil jniiiiiaii Iv 1?^ 
iivrlL one Iftlre iiiutiuse: tie de 
fiflVbl i,jrj-t;nKins.s. prinvijnd i'*- 
nioln ii’ eliarge du itu- 

senber^. d«in.t des ;fiboitM*t»i*it;s 
vfimieiii de bd p.irvenii'. li duti- 
naU un fao oimHi de ces doou- 
uieuls, soullKluuil tjue « *Me 
•o«1i oxaeUw oavid OroengUs* 
ecoonnutt impilcitomani quo •• 
dOtfOoltlofi d«*»nt la podc® 

ia luaiioa ocntioni d* nambeeu- 

fM conu^v#rlt^« ». 

E| Combat u]*tuii«U es: 

« peOt 4 i<* BOumottee 4 un« 
v4fifloaiion facile, puisquMI 
s'agtt do oompae^r loediU ca- 
eumorttb avoo r4cHiuj^ do £*0- 
«kl OreenglbH >• 


De$ milliers de signatures 

h Tambassade des Etats^Unis 


i 1 


Une dcleijatlon du Comity 
Franca i.- de Ucftn.se des Rosen- 
berji s’es! rendue Ic ayril a 
Fambassade des Etats-Unis. 

Ellc comprenaif les ccrivains 
Andre SPIRE et Michel LElRlS; 
MM. Hmest KAHAN’E, maitre 
de lecherchoj auCNl^, Charles 
PAL ANT, secretaire jreniral da 
MRAP. ainsi que Colette MO- 
REL. Albert YOUOINE. Albert 
‘LEW Cl M* DYMENSTEIN, du 
Bureau National du MRAP- 

La; delegation a remis aux au- 
torit<6s ankricainea ties lettres, 
rteolutions, petitions pour la re- 
vision du procts Rosenberg, por- 
tant plusieurs ntilliers de signa- 
tures, qui etaient parvrnurs au 
Comite au cours des dernieres 
semnines. 

MM. le professeur Vladimir 
FROLOW, dc rUniversitc de 
Pari.s. le docteur Jean DALS.A- 
CE. Oabricl TIMMORY s’cfaient 
asoocies a cette (idmarche. 

De nouvelles 


ttndoncts. UfW collect* ffuetuBU«o o 
ct4 toh*? pour iOut*nlr lo compognO 
en rovevi'’ Ro***'b*fO. 

One deiiouiion «t alii*, qoolquot 
iours plo» tofd, Pof1«f 4 rofnboxiod* 
dot rtct£*Uni*, Ic rMo'utioo odopt*o. 

Au Comxtdssarioi 
a TExiergie Atomique 

L« trovoUleu^* icientiliques du Conv 
mi%sorior 4 J'ineroi* cto»nl(^*e ont 
eorstituft yn Comiti de 04#ense dee 
Rcnenbcrg. 

Us onr lone* uo oppel toutipnont 
I'otnurdifi del offirmetionj de Groerv 
glo» lur le « wol du secret de lo 
bombe QtoniH|ue ». Cet opp^ 9m ter- 
mine pof un« denjonde de rivhion du 
p:oc4s. 

A I'Ecole 

Nonnole Superlouro 

Quetorze proresseurs, ouotre mem- 
bres d<7 I'odmlnistrotion et di*-neirf 
rTwmb'i.-% du perionnel de I'Ecolo Nof- 
mcle Supifieure. o Paris, onl liima 
ur>e p^fition dernondont lo grbee des 
Roimhclg. 


Etant di>niu» riu»pui'liince ce 
ves dut'Uiiieuw, ie iloiuilc fi'au- 
golo dc ilOfeuae iVisKUiljerg 
on deiiuiiiUi* uuxiiilot I’unujjunl- 
cation. U Icg |r:tn>inird'ur- 
geiice u Favocal des Uosenbeig, 
alnsI qu*h Fenee«il>\t; de ia pees- 
si*. 

Nous cB doiuion* lU'doAsous 
U- traduction • 

« BomodI, Join 

t Voloi 4' pou pr4ft las doclo- 
pottons quo i*oi faAes «u F.B.l. : 

c 1, d'al d4clar6 quo J’ovais 
rogu Bold 4 N-M.; 209. N High 
Stpoot, mon domicile ; Mi 
FBI) m*ont dli quo id lui ovoii 
dit de povonir ptus Ufd, pare# 
quo Jo o*avoi6 pai ka chosto 
prdioo. Je ne rno oouvonals po* 
do celo. moil J# Foi laiaoo .v*aU 
Iro dans ma declaeollon. Lort» 
quMI oat revenu S nouvoau, i’ol 
dit quo jo lU4 avai^ Jonr4 uno 
onvoloppo avec las trues dodans 
sans m'attandPO 4 4trd pays ot 
qu'aloro >1 m*o«oit donno ur.a an- 
voloppa dans laquelio J’al trouv4 
plus land BOO doltara. 


< d'ai Ki:r5 mentionne un ren-i 
qex-vous avec un honsme quo Ja- 
ne connaiaaalt pas. orronge par 
Julius. J*ai aitua approximative-' 
mant Fendroli do rendax-vou«, 
mats pas la data axacia. La Hau ■ 
■auit une voituro Olda apparte- 
nant 4 mon beau-p4re, quelqua 
part au-dasaue da la 4^ rua, 
«ur la premi4ro Avanuo. an mars, 
d*ai paria 4 Fhommo, male jo 
n’al pu mo rappolar quo iroa 
pau do chosos au aujat da notra 
conversation. J*ol pansa quo 
paut-4tro il ,voulaU quo jo r4r- 
fl4chiisa au aujoi dot lontltlas 
d'impiosion uUlltAoa dano loo 
oxpdriencas do la bombe alomU 
qua. 

c j*ai fait una dooiaration aur 
mon 408, ato. Voua oavax... lot 
ohotas habituolfea. Oo n*al man- 
tlonnS auouno autre ontrovuo- 
avac qul qua ec aolL 

€ Knooro uno cfioao 1 J*ai Wan- 
tifla Bold par un bout da paplar 
ou da canon, mala Ja na lour 
al paa dit oC> ni oommant j* 
I'avaio ou. d’ai ouoal plao4 d*uno 
fagon oortaino ma fommo on 
dohoro do la pi4co au momont 
da la vlatto de Bold. 

c Kgalamant, ja no savais, PAt 
qul m'avatt anvoy4 Bold. 

' « J'ai fall auaol un oroqula au, 
crayon d*un mouto da loniilto 
dMmploalon utilit* pour une ox- 
p4r»anoo. OAata Jo dola vows diro 
qua ja doia honnitament rocon- 
nattro qua loa ronaeignamenta 


la i'iut «b' iii'ni bcyu-frCM'O .|u- 
liu*... * !. ‘ 

l\'. II n'r.sl Ulluclir en uubijc 
I V il disciilper sa ihoprSe 
rououe. f\uUi UroongUHS. f«. J’ul 
intisai plttve d'niic fucoii ceilttlrie 
iiu femme en dehors de lR..pl«- 
j'e uu moment do lo vlsUe..jd^ 
ijold, *■;. ‘s:' 

4. La nu'innlre dc OroenglaM 
a I'-lfi sinKUlltrromenl e ra^L 

cble » anlre sa dc^MislUon >u 
FBI et sou Uunolguago 
!r«s. En effet : 

u) 11 doclare au FBI qu’ll 
« ii'a pu se rapprier qua Ircs 
ueu de olioses » d'une « cpriyer- 
saliuD * dunt II donna tous. Je* 
Ui^tails au proc4s, . 

b> It dduloro avoir UleuUfia 
Ookl 4 par un bout da papier pU 
dr carton *, alora qu’ll prdqlie 
. au - proces ' qua . c’r-oi une bolla 
Ue 4 jell.r t qul a servl i ridfp- 

tUioation,'- ' — ' 

y Gramglass reeoniwU enfln 
qkif; les * reoselgneinenU jaun- 
.ntfi a Gold *. quand II Fd 
«*oMr»^ favanl son arresloUbti) 
e aa tont paut-4tre pas dur^qt 
ceux qu’ll a dita dons s4 
raUon ♦ au FBI et au pf6c^f~ 
Tuus cat falls conflTippnl 
plelnri.'iant - les observallc^iLd^^i^ 
pubitces par les savanU.^ e| 'let 
Juflale^ les plus OnilnenlS ■spr 
rlnviiiweiublance du t(?mplg|ia^ 
de- Oreeiiglass. 11 apjiaraU pUia 

. c.4lyvm«Pt.enoor« *^“5- 
tlou de ee slnlstre Indlyiqu a, 4to 
inlse au -point dans da 


Api^S la piililliMlion III* Vr-’»lo- 
luments. la rVvbion du )irhn*> 

tMiiipiwte jilu.-* ipu* Juiriiiis. 



Apite lecture do reconiB en grace 


• IB 


i.Ai^rv ..rw « > ^ly ,;niachlnflllon pollcRre jpohida 

qua J’al donn4o.4 Bold no oont . loules pkcos mnlrg Iw.B®* 
paut-4t^^ poa du tout oou^ quo ^ 

J'sl diti.gana ma dbolarotlon. » - \ . 


Nous QVoils (public ihins notre 
dernier nuiuero dvs lellrrs 
adresstfes pur Ulverses pers»m- 
nalUi^s au ContiU* ft annuls dr 
Defense des Hosenboi’F. apr».‘s 
lecture du recours.en des 

deUx. Innocents. Void quelques- 
uues des nouvelles rcpoimes. qul 
sent puTvenues au CoiisUd V 

M. lulefl BLOCH 
Professeur Honoredre 
cm Collide de Fronce 

. Inutile quo jo ropoto ca -qui A- 
4U dit at blan dii dano to ro« 
cours on grAoa at dans leg d4- 
olarotloni de Jurlties campd- 
' tanU. Quant 4 4tro d'accord avao 
voua aur 00 soandaie, qiii no lo 
ooroitt 0*11 voulalt blan 4couior 
on Iut-4n4me la voii do r4qult4 
ou du bon sons ou do la chariU?. 

' Pierre LAROCHE 
Scenoriste 

Jo suit contra la polno do 
' morL mala Ja auit auaal oontro 

IfaaaaaainaL 

L*oi4eutlon dta Bo»anbA<'Q •••- 
patt un aMtaainaL 

II faut protoater daux tola. 


Jeon CASSOU 
‘ ' Directeur du Musm 
d'Art Modeme 

. .LOortainaa ciroonaUncoa do co 
ppocis at, on partJouller, lo fail 
qua I'acouaation port4e contra 
lot Soaanbarq aat prlnclpalamcnt 
■ baa4o aur la t4moignago daa 
.Broanglaaa, o’#aV-4-dlro d'accu- 
a4s dont, au contrairo, U oulpa* 
blliib aemblo MabJla, no taiaaont 
pas d*4iro axtramomant ..trou- 
blantas. 0*ou lo dovotr, pdur 
tout homma da conaclanca at do 
bonne foi> da a’aaaocier 4 Uuta 
' campagna d’opinlon tandant 4 
. obtanir la luopansion da Fax4* 
cutlon dta Roaonbarg at la ro- 
vlalon da laur prooAa. Jo aoua* 


cria de tout coeur 4 la pM‘ ior- 
qua voire mouvameo*^ orgr-'-iio 

an ca tans. 

Charles r>^ERT 
Compositeur 

mon point da vua « «7Ut- 

« affaire » aat qu'll a'sgit c uno 
oHania injusiiea, d*un m.yan 
dlnlimidation. tat an rail, 
arm# sa rote. "* 'ontra ■#« 
inatigotaurs. . . >'Jrtion ‘ quo 

touioa las bof:* : .iiont4x lon- 
tlnuaitt 4 proiCi >otir ai^t- 
fihar la crime, o*; -i. 'ie la ^;.'o 
barbola, crime c .rai‘i 

4 aasaaainar las daux .ns 

Sthst St dutius Roaeii;-e.-g. 

Una fois do plus, J’Snvu.t 
protaataVlon. 




« Z. Ja laur al dit qu’su court 
d'una visits qua mo femme ma 
tit an novambra 1944, alia inp 
domanda si ja vouorais donnfp 
das ronsalgnamanis. J’sl fall 
blan attantion da dire au 
qu'ella trantmattsit catta daman* 
de da la part da mon b«au-fri^ 
Julius at qua cels n’atait pas-.'is 


oveux 

Je 'Greenglase ‘ 

La I'eijuirc allcnllvo dc cotta 
lottrc ei ftoinpamlsiin avco la 

Jh position; dr Orrrng! a -s tiu pro-, 
efts Ho^ribPrg . ent .alnunl les 
uonstalplluns Huly^lcs : 

1. 4 lolsse Intro- 

duiio iiari^'su' diiclnrsllon des 
4.|i'*r.u«ujV'nui Tul oni fdo e sug- 

mfL^uycnok phH/le rrlo‘. dials 
if P/ii ^loti's*'* m'dllrr rift ns ma 
ditrlur^Uhn... si.* 

V. if’s-rsl alldrlu* sf.igurusr- 


AprOs ll^dOcouverle 

de deux IfpHs noiiveoux 


LISEZ NOS LECTEURS 


'5 


Une doclorcrtlos M* Marcel WULAHD 

Av«i>6t a la Cour 


Al OUA QAIA n pab*..ei4 • i* 

fxropra id^ tile falsait celo «nm>l «* 

rale 4lra an coitra li alia no rrm ris 

ravait P« demand*. , ^ 

^ 


41 ’ Jl ♦ • • . 

Apris la decouverte df pia- 
sieurs faits nouveaux prpuyqnt 
/e.s mtnsongrs dc Grerng/qss. 
'piincipol frmnin d rftflfgfJVW 
profcs {Rosenberg, le prrs/jj^ff fi-'f 
diirit^tur dc Georgs DimUrov. 
*M» Miiitcl WtLLARO, dvpeiit d 
Id Coitr, rtous a ndrrw^ fd 
sctvantt : 


vant les peuples et clevant I Hi^ 
toirc si jamais les niagistrats 
qui la composent s’exposaienl 
a nncffacahle deshonneur (qm 
les atteindrait tous) eu renou- 
vetant Ic geste de Pouce Pilate. 


UK- 

ttPT ' 


yeux du monde 
IfS; rPOlIX RnsCBbdfP 

40 '* 


Ethol " 5 ulio • • • 


Ce qu*en',pen80 
M.de Rotschild 

M. Pierre F:., iPorie, I Be}, noui fcMT 
post cTufi ^change de letfres ^*0 a 
su Ovec’ M. Guy de Rothtchild. 

Ca dernier lui oyont odrenO un 
t -o p p ei penorwMt > cn foveur tfteie 
orgr^'usotion qi/iI prtiide, le * Pondi 
Socioi Juit UnOi4 *. M. F... envoyo lo 
tomme de 250 fr. et praHto da i'oe- 
co»ion poor tenter tfobtenir one prise 
do position en fovexir dee RosenberO- 
ie m*inHfs— ee eert Jee molW- 
eem Reeeoberg, IcniOlllee ani4f1ceisie, 
icrit-il. PefteoOO qeni m peiA veoe 
leiieer imenelble, |e veee adreiaa, cl- 
Joint, ene eerte, qoe |e eerois frOe 
beuieiii que vem me lefoemiex levS- 
r«e 4e vetre, elgMOtere. Jointe 4 wUo 
d'oetvee 4ml«tenfe« p ereee w o l t H e, 'eOe 
prat ereb urte fronde billeeece oar 
ceux q«l oatiensent le vie Oe ees Oeux 
leelliaareex. 

tl recat, peu flprki, un accuse de 
reception ‘do to somme verste. Molt 
Rosenberg, pos question. M. F... 
insisto, dons une rKiuvoNe lettre : 

• Voui ee peeves Igeoeer l*extr*«e 
ezgence J'ojie prtse de position nette... 
ie ne pels erobe qee le piiUdsut de 
njU ee fero, per ten ellence, le cem- 
rHrr •♦'‘r dr .»/■«'« MmAI'rr.. 


evMS narteer d'e«f d'nn /r- '-s 

qei dtfposse let bornet c? •- c.*- 
i S on t o, 

Avec lo sirenitd, lo «(*.;;• dot ci 
bleosdorice qui le coroe'e^-j* nr, le ti. 
letin en question o pa:f-r^ octive- 
ment d lo compoone c:ii^^leusc.sur 
« I'emtiiamitismo en URiS ^ 5* esr vroi 
qu'll o* pOfl4 cutsi des •' : 

une pogo do cotomn'io* pr-. - . r-i ••S-'o 
en fwrur ds lo justice. . . . 


“Les staluet 
meurent aussi * 

ill’ la png*' 1) 

quant tons lea actas oasenti*.iO 
da la via. 

De ot film d’afl, se degage n 
qui, pou a peo, Vr. la 
penelrj oi voua place 4av-^.nt 
rtvidcnco : si diftdrentea solanv* 
alias, il n’y s de disUncs quo 
les hiiomstres qui les s^porenl, 
entre cette civilisation et lo n6* 
ire. 

Cs film Bobro, mesurft 


i-' 


.>1 




% 


1 

i 

4 


i! 


J 



i 

i\ 


•"Rl 

S 

:4 

i : 

;! 

li 





•f* t- I •’ . . ‘*:5 po^touA ; 

if?f- f *‘.in 1 .'-^ S 4 

Hf»rf»*W'>'' *1 ^wo. rJ^ ItonnrvtUier* ; 
jc* x«ir ‘,f» f-'i *viRA^ '•? MonUcuil, 

Meeting danB U IS' 

U#» jncft'Hg t'r'.l '■Jefouii Mn* V»ft#, 
'Jon. •? ’ 8 ' »e rjsf*!. Ont pril 
...jf f lo po'Olc MM. le po»* 

' i«ir Com»ll® conteil- 

t«i I’Vctai d* «a S*in« ’ M R-P. •#*- 
•or ut M» CloocJe'rfi-> - Uify. mem- 
. h»»k iju Buropu *■’'■■ 'W 5 » <JU 'MRAP. 

).ins f 8 *olui»o" * t.i*‘ .foojrt^ o 4 uno- 
nioitti piw • o4i*‘mbU© i co«ipo<ic 
cfhonvMs •» <«m.-"es da fogtei 


rotpouvea, cl idantIflAe par >a^ 
Oircct.on do Mdcy'C ; cetto U* 
bie avail bian coQtR eoviron ZO 
dollars ; il s'agiaMU d*Ufi arti- 
cle tf^a courant : laa Roionbero 
avateni plan dll la v4rita. Da«4d 
Qrcenglaas avail menti, e; la 
procureup Saypol B*dUit llvfA A 
do^ divagaiiona romanaaQuaa 
acnirairaft a la v4rlU<.. 

La variia finii toujoura par 
fa>pc bon chamin. at cala aipM- 
qua la hdta avao laquolla una 
parlle do ropinlon amarioalna, 
empolaonnee par Ida journaui 


ala publia par la Journal « Ooro^ 
bat >( qui, aur notra damandOi 
nous a ramla una photocopla. 11 
c'aQlt do la photocopla da trola 
pagaa manuacritaa, acritas par 
David Qraanglaaa, dans laaqual- 
lot oa darniap raconnalt aipraa- 
aimant quo la .RBt lui a fail 
mattra dona aa deposition das 
•dAolarations oontrairas 4 la ve- 
riU, ou dont II o'avalt plus au-. 
cuna aouvenanoa. La ComItA 
Frangaltt pour ta Oafanaa das 
Rotanoerg a .an«oyA» par avioot 
oaa pitotooopiaa A M* Bloch. Rt 
il aantfacllfti A ta Justioa amArU 


lArAoa A la oainpagna moodlalaj 
gu| a ffjit dlffWar pmala'ura foia 
I’ai Aoution 'Rogah^gi ia 
yA^m >fani'i^a aa manlfaatar 
^*ifna fagon 'Agtatanu ; at I'axA- 
CMlion das Appui Rdaonbarg bc* 
rati' PA oHa^; doni' la caroctAra 
ojjtaus na'^u^ait ptuo Atre dla* 
cIamIA'A I'oplj^h publfquA men- 
dTgVai'Un pAya'i'^Adthnie un tndi- 
sj^iT. a*hoii9fA.fa;peconnaiasAnl, 

gn v^dra^^nr lat' 
a- pii coAimatuif ; at toua laa 
homAi^ boAA# VolontA at- 
Undant a,^g ^nriAnaa la rAvi- 
Aloti dM p'roal^.. 


iauj>sai;e ay ant Ate contondus. 

Dana la pmeirs dcs KosenberR, 
aut'uii ioiin»ite hoinmo n'odmrt- 
trait Cfi« la teviainn soil refu- 
ai*e et quo lea condamnes ftojent 
privts, du droit ■AiAmeniaire do , 
fairr ‘eclater leur innoctnee, 
■alors Que dt ux faitfi nonvcaux 
ont we revOk's publiquement, 
qi.i s'Ubltscienl dans (luelles eon- 
diiiens !e temoignaRe k charge 
du dAiioiicialeur Grcengless a 
AiA labriquA. 

• La responsabililA de la Cour 
Supr^e aeiait ^rasante de- 


tiviiiiuvi' ; te*.4%4 -W4.» . 

La ComU& hollendsia de 
dAfanae des Rosenberg, qui 
donne oaito '.nfortnaiion. an- 
nonce Agalcmonl que la cem- 
pagne ao ddveloppc chaqua 
Jour davantage aux Paya- 
Bae. D'Amlnanics porsonnall- 
lAfl sO prononceni pour It 
grAoe dee Rosenberg. De 
multiplos dctogailone so ren- 
dant A rambatcade arnoricat- 
no et ouprcfi du premier mi- 
nlalre hoHandMli, lui deman- 
dant d*lnt«rven’r. 


L 


line inferview de M. Joseph BBAININ : // 

President o'u ConUtC omaricoin d* Odfomo des^Rosenborp . j 


‘ -f » *■ 



©f 






la 



des 


Oe paeaago « ?*srlei aeon-- 
sivur Joseph BRAiRIRi pra* 
Sidsnt du Comtle smericaln ' 
dc OAfer^ dei Roaenborg a 
b'.en vou?u eccora*.'* un iniar- 
vlew A 05?OIT «T LI88RT*. . 
Void las iaclarations qu*h 
noua a faltes. 

1) en est la compel* 
gm poor les Rosen*' 
boeg. omc Etort»>Unis? 

y a aujourd'hu!. cn AmA- 
. j. - ten millions Je paraon- 
ii- I*-; Kosunberg’ 

. 4 - "s n‘<lllons qui 

Ri'< nds dou- 
cs a*. • .v,t»^pobilitC ; 

i*es m'!no 't ■- lout feA 

!.-s cruyant c*. • estiment 

• la peine de u>>\ I injuA.^ 
vl Ce. 

ers cyndulaj'-’. mul- 
iir’liaiivt'c M)nt pritei dans 
‘vs Iss r-‘us aux 

qu.'tirre l oirts du •• >ys, .‘ehors 
:m*nie it* la -acnec 

iliretlen-cnt p. r c C imito de 
Dvknsc. qu! a vonji ibuA 

.» .ife»{jr ’‘opinim. 

; r.> d^i.T rations rrtentissan- 
tfc- iies pr esMi* UREY ct 
EINSTEIN u.’t civ -ijipuyces par 
»:n Rfaod noi .hre .. Iiomines de 
science. ‘ vr.i .'ion est grantJe 
pat mi Icb intelUcru^ih 

! ait .“an.s p^cojdch*, 2.5U0 ec- 
4. u.srasiiques, cujtproAani des 
* es di* tv. .;>«.< er pro- 
'• N d ‘ccoles •f'f-DloRiques, 
•:dnf dc s'Adtt.'i.-. r Pr^- 
it 'jT il’senhower. » - -j 
.M iuier 1;; {-iKc iii-. -.s 
'.r i-iiititer une eiM’.; . 

an inciis, !i»: •• • 

. ••‘■.'ipc*; individi«‘..<i arr* 

• • ;• ’do '• ••* f *. 

VI. -.v.:! ’'Uanlt 

- 4^-v.. •• r le 2f, 

' .'.it d.TCaU’r, ijium, a 
• -Yorif ».-*• -toj' 35.0CX) 


••i 


places) sera la plus grande^ nta- 
4 nifestation our ait eu lieu ^ 
’taveur des Roaenl^fg. ' , *• i 

2) Quellos sont lot 
repercus^ou d* Ig 
compagne ^ 
dioie ? 

. ' • 4 

— Je veils tuut'd*abQrd aaluer 

I'actioii vigoundnap’ tnenAe 'par. 
le poupie de Prahee. JoiAte It 
celle dc tous les ’oeupl^ du 
mnnde, die nous est tki jgrand 
encouragemejit et.jiUe iattue, ^ 
.mins aucun doute, sur les mi- 
lieux respunsables de *la coo^. 
damnation des Rosenberg. 

La journAe de dAIAgations que 
vous avez orgaoisAe le .13 jan- < 
vicr a Ati' particiUiAremeAt efft- 
cace. 

Au Ministere de la Justice, lea 
nppcLs et messages venue de 
tous les pays du monde, emptjA- 
sent i>ne piece entiAre. 

3) Avez*vott8 pu Tok 
Ethel et Julius Rosen- 
berg ? 

— Non. car les autorit^ ju- 
diciaires le.s tieniient dans le 
plus grand i^6lemetlt. Us ne.peu- 
vent voir, de temps en. temps, 
que leur avocst, Emanuel 
BLOCH ou un mambre de leur 
famine immediate- . 

Us recoivent leura enfants une 
lieure par mois, niais dans des 
cn*iditicf:s tfw pdiibles. La visi- 
'c ;i lieu dans une immense sailt*. 
E:/e! cr Julius, places aox deux 
opposes et entouris dc 
r;c peuvent se parter ; 
^*“ 0 'IS doivent courir de 
'all .'I ; rut re. 

Les Rosenberg nc regoivent 
cftTc, Leur avotji lev 
n forme vur I’abtmdant conrrJer 
cui leur ai adressA. 


Etbel est la seiile femme en 
AmcTique.^qtii solt condamn^-e i 
mart. La section des condamnAs 
a mort dans la prison des fem- 
mes de Sing-Sing n'est mainte- 
mue que pour elle. 

4) Que 8avez*vou8 des 
presuons qul sont 

V ' . exercees sur les deux 
. oondomii&s ? 

Ethel et’julius Rosenberg 
font preuve d’un moral extraor- 
dinaire. MAme aux -jours les plus 
sombres, quand le President 
Eisenhower a rejetA leur re- 
cours en grAce 'et que U chaise 
Alectrique Atait prcparce pour 
eux, -iU n'ont jamais faibii, iU 
n'ont pas ces-sA de proclamer 
leur Innocence- 

Pourtant, de nombreuses ten- 
tatives ont Ate faites pour lea 
pousser a acheter leur vie So 
prix d’un reniement. On a utilbA 
a cet effet mAme des raembrea 
de leur familie et jusqu’a leurx 
enfants. On a faH Agalemcnt S0« 
voir a Ethel qtt’elle nurait U 
vie sauve si elle faisait « par- 
ler » son mari. 

Cette guerre des nerfs, que 
Top 0 comparee a la c question 
du 3* degre * se heurtc a ia re* 
solution des deux innocents et 
a leur confiance dans la solida- 
ritA des bommes epris de justice. 

5) . La. condomnertion 
des Rosenberg a* 
t'oUe quelque rap- 
port ovec rantiseml- 
tisnia ? 

— l.es Rosenberg, •.‘omme ce 
fm le cas jjour. Sacco et Van- 
zotti, appartiimnent a un groupe 
minoritaire. 


‘-/C’est A dessein,^ ^bl&A-il. *. 
que Ton a choisi pour kur pro-,, 
ces, un Juge At un procureur 
jiiifs sachant que ces derniers 
seraieht intinjidAs par la pres- 
sion des groupes antisAmites et 
anticommunistes, dont Tinfluen- 
ce sur la vie politique amAri- • 
caine crott sans cesse. *Confor- 
mAment A I’Atat d’espiit de lAur 
milieu, ces magistrats, pensant 
barter d‘eux t’accusation de ■ 
€ judeo-kmlchevisme >, se sont 
fails sclemment les bourreai^ 
des Rosenberg. II est done cer- 
tain que Torigine juive d’Ethe! . 
et Julius Rosenberg a Ate dAter- 
minante dans 'leur.-.condamna-. 
tion. 

D'autre -part, il faut suulig.ner 
que sur les deux millions et 
demi de juifs (un quart de la po- 
pulation) qui habitant -New- 
York, aucun n’a AtA retenu par 
le tribunal comme niembre- du 

J“^y- . . 

Les groupes antisemite.^ ont 
exploite au maximum cette af- 
faire, qui justifie, proclament- 
ils, les campagnes qu'ils me- 
naient, bien avant, sur. le « vol . 
du secret de la bombe atoniique ' 
par les juifs >. Seion eux, le 
gouvernement a montre. en fai- 
sant poursuHire et condamnant 
les Rosenberg, qu'il comprepait 
le « danger juif . 

L’antisemitisme, qui a beau- 
coup gagnA a cette affaire, at' 
teindrait Avidemment son j)a- 
roxysme si les Rosenberg Ataient 
executAs- 


6) Comment I'antisemi- 
tiame se maniieste- 
t-il oujourd'bui oux 
Etots-Unia ? 

— Au.^ourd’bui, cn Amdnque. 
I'antli.klnntisnie revAt ta forme ia 
plus dangereuse qui scit : <1 a 
pris un c^.ctAre politiquA. 


CV n‘i^t un secret pour per-: 
sunne que ta loi Mac Car ran - 
suT I'immigraiion ci les nalu-. 
ralisations. est dirigee centre 
mutes les minorilAs, et spAcia- 
lament contie les juifs. L« t'ol“ 
lahoratvur de Me Carran, le re- 
presentant Walter, a d’allleurs 
'diklare .publiquement que les 
adversaires de cette loi sont des 
. < Juifs profcssiorinels >■ 

L’antisemitisme se base sur la 
<fayance de/plus en plus rApan- 
due,' que *es Juifs. s’ils ne sont 
pas tous des rouges » (reds), 
sont pour le moins dea < roses > 
(pinks). C'est done derriere la 
facade de la lutte centre ie com- 
muniame, au notn du patrio- 
tisme le plus intransigeant, qu’il 
oiend ae?- ravages dans le pays, 
iusqu’a Senat et au Congres. 

Dans les milieux d’affaires, 
•oil il est tr^ influent, le « thAo- 
ricien » Mervin K. HART s’ef- 
force de demontrer. par sea bul- 
letins. hebdomadaires que 
Juifs ne peuvent etre consideres 
comme des c citoyens loyaux a, 
parce qu'ils sont assocics A Iq 
;^.cau.‘ic ipteinatiqq^lc commt^ 
niste' 

Cette propagandc, violent^ bu 
subtile seion les cas, que cQijlj^ 
pletent dc wastes campagnes ca-' 
Jomnteustts contre les Juift^^i 
.occupant des pustes imporlapra, 
a des repercussions dans Iq jfili 
quotidrentte. 11 y a quelque 
temps, un rAferendum a AtA lap£ 
cA dans olusieurs grandes vijlA's 
5 ur ie tliAmc : « Voudriei-yQjjs 
avoir de-s Jui^s comnK* vo| 5 iM.,? 
Pensez-Yous ouc des juifa^ coi^ 
vent p.'’..’‘ticioer a:; gOuvjtfPY? 
ment ? etc. Plus de .YJ % (N 
ont rApondu nAgatir 
vement, affirmc-t-on. n ces'Qtte^ 
tion-- , 7 i., 

Les ati-iqucs conlr*; les JujN* 
leufR maii^ons et les synagogue 
r.’tsnt Yait uye croitre au coujff 



d« AoMMcIMM •!«. an mitmm tamps qa« 
pmMaat Am FlIU, ptAsidenf dy Con- 
•iftelrt Cfenttol dn Isrou'ltn d« r-oti. 
ce. C'esI en cCtte dernlce* qj..Cta 
quM ptendia •ventimliemcnt po: .-iei* 
mt l« qyyftiM Ae—tiAy f a, pout oktont 
qM reea*>l— rypeAediitotlf d*. lo 
CommyMitta Ip |ho**« dMtr«W«. 

A ce |Ou>, M. Guy eJe Rothichtld n'o 
po*, pfifc mOtviduettement lo poe.Son 
iMtte qui lui Atoit oemonde*. Co>* me j 
noTre correspcjndont. chocun tirere de f 
son artituUd la conclusion qui t' m- 
■poM. 

L’eaprit deZola 

C'Mt Agoldfnynt de Toffoirfr Rc jn- 
IWO. enfro outres miustices. que M. 
RuOen H... (Miuincute), porlolt ou 
G and RoUMn Deuttch, de Stiasdo.^.'o, 
duiU une lettre dont il nous cxA. su 
X. copte. 

A propoe d'un aci.cie.fuc /oka. 
den* le Bulletin des Communc.:;«s 
Juives ifAiioca et dt ijQcroine, M 
RiLun H... Acfivoit ; 

Ve«fl Ates ga*ll f«Nct cAveaiw ce 
• 0 ^ chlecafqrwA. Aux U.LA., la* 
Apeex aei eeb eff veat Atie A te s trecu- 
tAs A eelda 4e • pcaavee > (f) ... 
celo pavoit InccayeMe- — enceee pAts 
foihiM ^oe cettes le e tA w , otto* mmH 


. M. .Joseph BAAINIM 

des derniers moU. L’affaire RG- 
SENBERG est une partie inte- 
,;rante de I'atmosphere alnsi 
ervee. 

7) Quelles Bont aolon 
vous, las perspoch- 
ves de la lutte en ia- 
veur des Rosenberg ? 

✓ 

— 11 n’y a pas !e moindre 
doute que Taction mer>ee en 
Amerique, avec Tappui du mon- 
de enticr, a rAu.ssi jusqu’a p: si- 
sent a sauver ies .Rosunberg de 
)a mort. 

Mals les prochai>'ea scmaines, 
qu' nous sepa*ent po la decision 
de la Cour SuprAme sont par- 
tkulierement critiques. Les mes- 
sages. les dcsegations doivent 
cire p!i:«i nombrt'ux ouc j.imais. 
U laut que les appela rctentis- 
nent avec une force toujour^ 
cfoissantc dans lc< milieux les 
plus divers. 

Si Taction mondiale s’intensi- 
fic encore, nous avo.ns I’espoir 
d’arracher les deux innocents a 
la chaise electriquo et de faire 
triompher la justice. 


L*auteue <iSu 
“ Salaire de la peur ” 

L’Acr-.iralr) Qeorgaa ARWAOO, 
autou- efw- llvra « Le BaJr'ro Ua 
la Poor *, vszj'.* io Jomd.-c von 
nom u U !*etc des ict'lYf.r'i gui 
ont damando k. via oaur 

fat fJntanPar?. 


iioraiont pay cit ooinpotuion a 
Cmines, cotte Oibvra otani con- 
* ider A.? comme dangofauao paroa 
L,c.‘cl>c mcl cn doule le» bian- 
feits Jc ia civitication blanche, 
pour ran nagre. On propoaa 
oux raall&atour^ de coupar a laa 
tcenea ganantas Ha a'y rafu- 
aoroni A juxta tltre. Ci lea cho- 
sen on Lont restocs la. 

II faut :,ouhs!ler pourlant qua 
lu ben senL i’cmponicra sur laa 
projL-gea, la liberie ri'axpresslon 
bur la* « iracatserlea adminia* 
tratives >, et que nous pourrona 
admirer procht.ncmant ca court- 
mstrage, qui honore la oinAma 
frangala. 


e«ssL oah la ceatphatlaa du i li ati ca . 
••als M h aTt i at paar awachar A la 
matt 'IHmI at iyWiia Keaa tibaf a, pcur 
oa pa» faba daas atp h atoa da p4y», 
'vna aaiaoHlA da bra c ha i a t oV puAlIca* 
tkiM, caUo^lA aiA i aaa qid oaV can* 
•arvA I'a^r da Zola. 

J« lais aAr qaa ta Byliotitt vaadro 
pfondra port A cotta tytto at aa hattro 
oai cotds doa otiyrlart do chas So- 
naytt, dot UnJtranitairat do SHoshoairfl 
at do htoo d*aiitraa aaeaaa, pavr la 
at aa pcopao' via... 



Il rocut cats# Atrof^ raperao : 

Naaa no aiMiTMot lataodAa A oitcoa 
parti at antendona domoiMar aoutro a 
lout on itiometiieat laraqy'lS lo taut, 
tavta lalucMco, qy^alla vtonao do dralta 
.oa do fauebo. Mels aous la folaoea 
— Vova voaa an aaras oporfy 
avac la aArnnlld d T iy maa «ul aavont 
quo nufoiaMtA cat fa^lt, at noua 


idse-antonlD 


COOreXATIVt OUVRIfKt 

Art * Coititire - 
X2G, rue de la Boetie 
PARlB-3' ELY'. 63-40 

neductiaa impcjtonta 
ays lacroyra du Joymol 


vom, C'EST OOMPBENORC ET C'EST AQIR 


BRNI-DONNARD 

PROMESSE 
0 B L’HOMMK 

L'axtMptoUa awnAfotA : 1.S00 U. 

L*a« sa ipl o lra a»r Pur Ffl iotianRer 
mv%t nao nthogfapAla origtnai-i 
da lia;' S.000 fr. 

* ARAQOId 

L’EXEMPLE 
DE COURBET 

Pv:a : S.fiAA fr. 

Claude ROV 
GOYA 

I fr. 


plOASSO-fLUARD 

L'E VISAGE 
D E LA P A I X 

C'cr.cifipiirira ni/marala : 1.200 fr. 

L'cscmplniro sat Pur Fit J*h«nacr 
av« tfna lithooroahM etiqit*-:# 
tjo PU^ns» 1.000 #r. 

Paui elUAND 

A.VTHOLOCaK 
DEH ECRITS SUR L‘ART 
p*u i.rsa fr. 

Andre IVURMSuA 

D A U .M ! E R 

5 *- X : I .aw ♦.% 


DEUX PEINTKES ET I’.V ?OETE 
RETOUJC frALGElGF 

qorla TA8L.ITZIIV, MiraiMd m.'AILHC 0 *. sfeoovns CUBOIS 

f*. 








* 


F2DERAI ?LT.EAU c? :rr; IST! a 
It i cf h; 5 Ti:= 

COMMaKiCATfGNS SECliO:: 

HAYl t|53 

TEL^WE 


/ 


WASH FROM NEW YORK 13 


9-55 A 


DIRECTOR 


URGENT 


.ALL info!L'':atic:; contai.^jeD'j 

lijlT'iEIN IS UNCLASSIFIED • ’ 

DATK_?-.a V-g* ^ RY 3o Va jW roA. 


-v-— 

Mr. To!son,r^ - 
Mr. Ladd.,.. 

Mr. 

Tr*lm<'v 
:i?sg. — 

Mr. (ilrivin 

Mr. Harbo 

Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Tracy 

Mr. Gearty 


Mr. Mohr 

Mr, Winterrowd« 

Tele. Room 

Mr. Holloman 

Mn Sizoo 

Miss Gandy 



ATTEN. J,,NSP. HENNPICH. 

d- 

JULIU.S ROSENBERG, ETAL, ESP R, RUTH GREENGLASS MADE AVAILABLE 
A HAND WRITTEN STATEMENT THAT SHE HAD PREPARED AT THE REQUEST OF 
HER ATTORNEY, MR, FABRICANT. SHE HAS KEPT THIS STATEMENT IN HER 
HOUSE fROM THE TIME SHE PREPARED IT IN JUNE OF NINETEEN FIFTY, /" / 
THIS STATEMENT WAS PREPARED SO THAT MR, FABRICANT WOULD KNOW THE 
DETAILS OF HER INTERVIEW BY BUREAU AGENTS ON JUNE SIXTEENTH, FIFTY, 

THIS STATEMENT READS AS FOLLOWS QUOTE /PAGE ONE/ GENERAL INFOR- 

MATION - HOW LONG I WAS MARRIED - HOW SOON AFTER MARRIAGE DAVE 
WAS INDUCTED - FOUR MONTHS, WHERE WAS HE WHILE IN THE ARMY - 
I TOLD THEM ABOUT ABERDEEN, MD,, CALIF,, JACKSON, MISS., OAKPICGE, 

TENN, LOS ALAMOS, THEY ASKED ME ABOUT HOW LONG HE WAS IN LOS 
ALAMOS - I SAID ROUGHLY, ABOUT TWO YEARS, THEY ASKED ME IF I 
EVER WENT DOWN THERE, I SAID YES, TWICE, ONCE IN NOVEMBER OF 
'■ORTYFOUR, SPENT FIVE DAYS THERE TO CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY, WENT 
IN MARCH 0^ FORTY FIVE, LIVED THERE TILL MARCH OF FORTY SIX, - 

/PAGE TWO A/ THEY ASKED ME IF ANY MEMBER CF, MY-FAMILY ,HAD/ 

* 2 ^ //} < ir i/ 

EVER VISITED ME FROM N,Y, I SAID NO, NOBODY HAD THAT KIND OF MONEY 

f ^ s 

TO TAKE OFF AND VISIT - THEY PRESSED THE POINT AND ASKED IF ANYONE 
HAD VISITED ME from N,Y, AND I SAID NO, THEY ASKED IF GOLD HAD 

VISITED ME, I SAID NO, THEY ASKED IF I KNEW OF HIM, IF I-D 
END PAGE ONE 


r 

\ 










PAGE TWO 

HEARD THE NAME, I SAID I-D SEEN IT IN THE NEWSPAPERS, THEY ASKED 
IF I DIDN-T RECOGNIZE THE PICTURE OF SOMEONE WHO HAD COME VISIT 
ME IN JUNE 8? JULY OF NINETEEN FORTY FIVE# I SAID NO, /PAGE TWO 8/ 
THEY ASKED ME WHOM I HAD SEEN BEFORE I WENT TO SPEND MY ANNIVER- 
SARY WITH DAVE, I SAID I HAD SAID GOODBYE TO MY, FAMILY AND FRIENDS 
AND THEY SAID WHO ELSE, I SAID MY HYSBANDS FAMILY THEY SAID WHO 
IN YOUR HUSBANDS FAMILY/Q/ I SAID HIS MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS, 
SISTER, HUSBANDS WIVES, I COULPN-T REMEMBER EXACTLY, WHOEVER 
WAS AROUND, THEY SAID WHAT IS YOUR HUSBAND-S SISTER-S NAME/Q/ 

I SAID ETHEL, WHAT IS HER HUSBANDS NAME, AND I TOLD THEM, THEY 
ASKED IF I HAD SEEN JULIE IN THE PERIOD OF THE WEEK OR TWO BEFORE 
I WENT AWAY, I SAID IT WAS RIDICULOUS TO EXPECT ME TO REMEMBER 
WHOM I HAD SEEN, BECAUSE I WAS BUSY WORKING IN THE DAY AND SHOPPING 
evenings, /page two C/ until THE DAY BEFORE I LEFT THEY SAID, 
AGAIN, WE ARE NOT TRYING TO TRAP YOU, THIS THING IS BIGGER THAN 
YOU UNDERSTAND PERHAPS THE BIGGEST THING THE F,B.I, HAS DONE IN 
THIS COUNTRY, THAT IT WAS AS IMPORTANT TO THEM AS IT WAS TO 
ME TO GET THE TRUE FACTS THAT THEY WERE NOT TELLING ME ANYTHING 
BUT THE TRUTH, THAT THIS MEANT THEIR REPUTATIONS, THEIR JOBS, . 

I SAID THAT THE F,B,I, WERE MADE UP OF PEOPLE, THAT THEY WERE NOT 
INFALLIBLE, THAT THEY COULD MAKE MISTAKES. THEY SAID, NOT IN A 


END PAGE TWO 


* 




PAGE THREE 

THING LIKE THIS, I SAID THAT I WAS SORRY, I STILL MAINTAINED THAT 

MY HUSBAND COULD NOT HAVE SAID SUCH A THING, /PAGE THREE/ THEY ; 

ASKED ME WHERE I HAD LIVED IN ALBEQERQUE,, I TOLD THEM, SINGLE 

QUOTE NORTH FIFTH ST, TWO ZERO NINE NORTH HIGH, AND SOMEWHERE ON 

SOUTH EIGHTH WITH, SOME FRIENDS, THEY ASKED ME WHERE I HAD LIVED 

THE LONGEST, I SAID ABOUT TEN MONTHS AT NORTH HIGH THEY ASKED 
• • 

ME WHAT I DID WHILE I WAS THEREjt I TOLD THEM I WAS EMPLOYED ON 
A TEMPORARY JOB BY THE SINGLE QUOTE SOIL CONSERVATION UNQUOTE, 

AND THEN FOR THE GREATER PART OF THE TIME BY THE 0,P,A, TO SUPPORT 
MYSELF, THEY ASKED WHAT MY SOURCES OF INCOME WERE, AND I SAID MY 
JOB, MY HUSBANDS ALLOTMENT, /PAGE FOUR/ THEY WANTED TO KNOW IF 
AT ANY TIME I HAD RECEIVED A CONSIDERABLE SUM OF MONEY, AND I 
SAID SINGLE QUOTE WHO GIVES AWAY MONEY FOR NOTHING/Q/ UNQUOTE, 
t HAVE NO RICH RELATIVES, THEY ASKED IF MY SALARY AND MY ALLOT- 
MENT WERE MY ONLY SOURCES OF INCOME, AND I SAID THAT AND WHATEVER 
SAVINGS WE HAD ACCUMULATED PRIOR TO MY HUSBANDS INDUCTION, I 
SAID THEY WERE SUFFICIENT TO COVER MY TRAVELING EXPENSES, BUT THAT 
I HAD BEEN YOUNGER THEN AND SPENT WHATEVER I HAD, NOT REALIZING 

THAT THERE WAS A FUTURE, NOT ONLY JUST TODAY, THEY ASKED ME THE 

. \ 



END PAGE THREE 


PAGE FOUR 

NAME OF THE PEOPLE WHO OWNED THE HOUSE AT NORTH HIGH ST. I TOLD 

j 

THEM IT WAS A FREEMAN FAMILY. THEY ASKED ME IT I COULD /PAGE FIVE/ 
REMEMBER ANYTHING ABOUT THE HOUSE PHYSICAL DETAILS, AND WHO LIVED 
IN IT, I SAID IT WAS A TWO STORY HOUSE THE OWNER LIVED ON THE FIRST 
FLOOR, ON THE SECOND FLOOR WE LIVED ALONG WITH A WIDOW, AND IN THE 
FRONT A SPINSTER AND HER FRIEND, IN BACK OF THE HOUSE IN A BUNGA- 
LOW, LIVED A GI AND HIS FAMILY, HE WAS FROM KIRTLAND AIR FIELD. 
PARAGRAPH THEY ASKED ME TO TELL WHATEVER I COULD AT /AT CROSSED OUT/ 
REMEMBER ABOUT THE FREEMANS AND TO DESCRIBE THE MAN, I SAID THE 
MAN I REMEMBERED TO BE ABOUT FIFTY OR SIXTY, KIND OF STOCKY, 

WORE GLASSES AND WAS GRAY HAIRED, THEY QUESTIONED ME, WAS HE GRAY 
OR WHITE, I COULDN-T REMEMBER, /PAGE SIX/ I SAID THAT THE WIFE 
HAD BEEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, AND THEY HAD A HOBBY OF COLLECTING RUGS, 

T REMEMBERED THAT THEY WERE MAKING AN APARTMENT OUT OF THEIR 
PORCH, AND RENT THEIR PART OF THE HOUSE, THEY SAID THAT GOLD 
CLAIMED THAT IN JUNE OR JULY OF FORTYFIVE, HE CAME TO THE HOUSE 
AND MY HUSBAND GAVE SOMETHING TO HIM, AND THAT HE RETURNED AND 
GAVE SOMETHING TO MY HUSBAND, AND THAT AHREE OF US /LAST THREE WORDS 
CROSSED OUT/ GOLD, MY HUSBAND AND I WALKED A FEW- BLOCKS, I 
SAID THIS WAS NOT SO, I DID NOT KNOW THE MAN AND SUCH A THING 
NEVER HAPPENED, PARAGRAPH THEY SAID MY HUSBAND 

HAD ADMITTED ALL THIS TO BE TRUE, I SAID THIS COULD NOT BE POSSIBLE, 
END PAGE FOUR 



PAGE FIVE 

THAT WE LIVED IN A ONE AND ONE HALF ROOM APT, ANYONE VISITING ME COULD 
HAVE VISITED MY HUSBAND, AND THAT /PAGE SEVEN/ WE HAD RECEIVED NO SUCH 
VISITOR, PARAGRAPH, THEY SAID AGAIN AND AGAIN THAT THEY WERE NOT 
TRYING TO TRAP ME, NOR DID THEY WANT TO PUT WORDS IN MY MOUTH. 

THEY ASKED IF I ME /LAST FIVE WORDS CROSSED OUT/, THEY ASKED WAS I 
CALLING THEM LIARS/Q/ OR DIDN-T I BELIEVE MY HUSBAND /Q/ I SAID I 
WAS NOT CALLING THEM LIARS THAT I DID NOT BELIEVE MY HUSBAND HAD 
MADE SUCH STATEMENTS, THAT I WOULD HAVE TO HEAR IT FROM HIS MOUTH 
AND THEN I WOULD NOT BELIEVE IT BECAUSE IT WAS NOT TRUE, ONE OF THE 
MEN ASKED ME IF I LOVED MY HUSBAND, IF THAT-S WHY I WAS TAKING THIS 
STAND, THE OTHER SAID I REALIZED SHE-S ACTING THIS WAY, I WOULD WANT 

! 

MY WIFE TO ACT THE SAME WAY, I CAN UNDERSTAND IT, PARAGRAPH, I ASKED 
WHERE MY HUSBAND WAS, THEY /PAGE EIGHT/ TOLD ME HE WAS IN THEIR OFFICE, 

I SAID WAS HE UNDER ARREST /Q/ THEY SAID THAT WHEN THEY HAD LEFT 
THE OFFICE ABOUT ONE O-CLOCK, HE HAD NOT BEEN UNDER ARREST, PARAGRAPH, 
y SAID /LAST TWO WORDS CROSSED OUT/ THEY SAID, WOULD YOU CORROBORATE TH] 
IF YOU HEARD IT FROM YOUR HUSBAND /Q/ I SAID I WANTED TO SEE MY 
HUSBAND, AND THEN I WOULD SAY NOTHING WITHOUT A LAWYER, ONE OF THE MEN. 
TULLY, CALLED THE FBI OFFICE TO FIND OUT IF IT WERE POSSIBLE FOR ME TO 
SEE DAVE, HE WAS TOLD THAT DAVE WAS PUT UNDER ARREST, AND WA? BEING 
HELD IN THE CUSTODY OF THE MARSHAL, NO ONE COULD SEE HIM THEN, 

BUT THAT LATER THAT DAY HE WAS TO BE MOVED TO THE FEDERAL HOUSE OF 
DETENTION, I SAID I-M SORRY, I HAD NOTHING FURTHER TO SAY TO THEM, 

END PAGE FmH 




PAGE SIX 

/PAGE SIX B/ PARAGRAPH, THEY ASKED ME IF I KNEW A MAN NAMED FRANK 
KESSLER AND I SAID NO, I HAD NEVER HEARD OF HIM* THEY ASKED IF I HAD 
EVER HEARD OF A MAN FRANK MARTIN, IS SAID NO DASH, DASH /END OF 
STATEMENT/, RENYTEL MAY FIRST NINETEEN FIFTY THREE CONCERNING DAVID 
ROSENBERG REQUEST TO RUTH GREENGLASS FOR A LETTER OF DAVID GREENGLASS 
SO HE COULD VISIT JULIUS AND ETHEL TO PERSUADE THEM TO CONFESS, FOR 
INFO BUREAU, NYO CONSIDERS POSSIBILITY THAT DAVID ROSENBERG IS 
ATTEMPTING TO GAIN POSSESSION OF DAVID GREENGLASS KNOWN HANDWRITING 
SPECIMENS THROUGH ARTIFICE FOR PURPOSES OF HAVING HANDWRITING EXPERT 
IDENTIFY THE STATEMENT OF DAVID GREENGLASS GIVEN 0, JOHN ROGGE-S 
OFFICE IN NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY AND APPEARING IN FRENCH NEWS- 
PAPER ^'HUMANITE**, being CONFIDENTIALLY 

CONTACTED WITH REQUEST THAT HE REPORT TO NYO ALL VISITS OF DAVID 
ROSENBERG WITH JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG TOGETHER WITH CONTEXT OF THEI? 
CONVERSATIONS, BUREAU WILL BE ADVISED OF DEVELOPMENTS, 

BOARDMAN. . ' .. 

END 



fiO; KB. BEUIONT 

AND SUPEEVTSOB 



D02L INTBL, DIVISION 








tiUQ} - 2 


Assistant Attorney General 
Warren Olney III 

Director, FBI 

^ 6 

JULIUS ROSENBERG, et »1. 

ESPIONAGE - R 


May 6, 1953 


CC - Mr, Belmont 




ToIsoq - 

Ntcbots 

Beimt 

Cletw-- 

GIb^b 

Hsrbo — 


Rose* 

Tracf 

Cemitf 

^okr 

Riotcrn>»d 

Ic-Ic. Rooib.^ 

Ilollofltaa 

Stco# . 

r<lits Gaad^ . 


Reference is made to our memorandum dated 
May 1, 1953* concerning the handwritten statement 
prepared by David Greenglass in June, 1950, at the 
request of his attorney, 0, John Rogge, after his 
arrest. Our memorandum advised that Ruth Greenglass 
had also prepared a handwritten statement at the r» • n 
request of her attorney, but that her attorney had 4^ L IwtrO 
no recollection of receiving this statement, Ihls 
statement was thereafter located by her- In her home. 

On April 30, 1953f Ruth Greenglass made 
this statement available to our New York Office, She 
has advised that she prepared the statement in June, 

1950, at the specific request of her attorney, so that 
he would know the full details of her interview by our 
agents cn June 16, 1950, However, her attorney did 
not thereafter ask for her statement and she did not 
give it to him. She states that she has kept the 
statement in her home from the time she prepared it 
in June, 1950« Ihis statement reads as follows t 

"(Page one) General Information - How long I 
was married - How soon after marriage Dave was Inducted - 
four months. Where was he while in the Army • I told 
them about Aberdeen, Md,, Calif,, Jackson, Hiss., Cakrldge, 
lenn, los Alamos, Ihey asked me about how long he was in 
Los Alamos - I said roughly, about two years. They asked 
me if I ever went down there, I said yes, twice. Cnee in 
November of spent five days there to celebrate 
anniversary. Went in March of 45, lived there till March 
of 46, (Page two A) They asked me if any member of mV 
family had ever visited me from N.Y, I said no, nobody 
had that kind of money to take off and visit - They pressed 
the point and asked if ai^cne had visited me from N.Y. ^d 
I said no. They asked If Gold had visited me, I said to. 
They asked if I knew of him, if I*d heard the .r*®®®* I said 
I'd seen it in the newspapers. They asked^.lf'I didn't . 
recognize the picture of someone who had'^’cobe visit me in 


APL : mem 



tT.f' 




or July of 19^59 X said no* (Page tvo B) 

Thay asked ise vh(»B I had seen before I vent to 
spend my anniversary vlth Dave* X said I had said 
goodbye to ay family and friends aind they said vho f : 
elsOf I said my husbands family they said vho in . 
your husbands family? I said his mother* fatherf - 
brothers, sTiTter, husbands vives* 1 'couldn't 
remember exactly, whoever was around. They said 
what is your husband’s sister’s name? I said 
Ethel. What is her husbands name, and I told them. 

Ihey asked if I had seen Julie in the period of 
the week or two before I vent away. I said it was 
ridiculous to expect me to remember whom I had seen, 
because I was busy working in the day and shopping 
evenings. (Page two C) Until the day before I 
left they said, again, we are not trying to trap 
you. Ihis thing is bigger than you understand 
perhaps the biggest thing the F.B.I. has done in 
this country, lhat it was as important to them as 
it was to me to get the true facts that they were 
not telling me anything hut the truth, that this 
meant their reputations, their jobs. I said that 
the h.F, were ma le up of people, that they were 
not infallible, that they could make mistakes. 

They said, not in a thing like this. I said that 
I was sorry, I still maintained that my husband 
could not have said such a thing. -/XPage three) 

They asked me where I had lived in ^Ibegeroue . , X 
told them, ’Korth Fifth St. 209 Horth High, and 
somewhere on South Eight with some friends*. They 
asked me where I had lived the longest, I said 
about ten months at Kcrth High they '^sked me what 
I did while I was there, I told theis\^I was employed 
on a temporary job at the ’Soil Conservation,’ and 
then for the greater pert of the time'- by the O.P.A. 
to support myself, Ihey asked what my sources of 
income were, and I said my job, my husbands allot- 
ment, (Page fo\ir) Ihey wanted to knoW if at any 
time I had received a considerable sum of money, 
and I said ’V/ho gives away money for nothing?* X 
have no rich relatives. They asked if my salary 
and my allotment were my only sources of Income, 
and I said that and whatever savings we '^had accumulated 
prior to n;y huscands induction, I said 'they v’cre 
suff lelent to cevor my traveling expenses, tut that 


I had been younger then and spent whatever I had. 
not realizing that there was a future, not only : 
just today. They asked oe the name of the people' 
who owned the house at North High St. I told them 
It was a Freeman family. Ihey asked me it Z could 
(Fage five) remernber anything about the house 
physical details, and who lived In It. I said it 
was a two story house the owner lived cn the first 
floor, cn the second floor we lived along with a 
widow, and In the front a spinster and her friend. 

In tack of the hoi;se In a bungalow, lived a 01 and 
his family. Ke was from Klrtland Air Field. 

"They asked oe to tell whatever I could at 
(at crossed out) remember about the Freemens and to 
describe the man. I said the man 1 remembered to be 
about fifty or sixty, kind of stocky, wore glasses 
end was gray haired. They questioned me, was he gras 

J remember. (Page six) I said 

that the wife had been a school teacher, and they 
had a hobby of ccJ'ectin: ri;gs, I rsmerbered t^^et 
t ,ey wore nakin;- an anartinent -“ut of their porch, 
and ren^ t -.elr part of the house, 'ihe- said tha* 

ca-e'to 

the house and my husband gave something to him, and 
that he returned and gave something to my husband, 

Md that three of ti3 (last throe words crossed ou{) 
0o*d. my husband and I walked a few blocks. I said 
t-.ls was not so, I did not know the nan and such a 
thing never happened, 

"ihey said ray husband had adrjltted all this 
to be true, I said this could not be possible, that 

a one and one half roora apt, anyone 
visiting me could have visited ray husband, and that 
vrape soven) ve had received no such visitor# 

^ "Ihey said asaln and again that they were 
not trying to trap me, nor did they want to put words 
in oy ^iith# They asked If I me (last five words 

asked was 1 calling them liars? . 
°y husband? I said I was not 
calllr=g then liars that I did not believe my husband 
had made such statererts, that I would have to hear 
It fren hjs mouth and then I would rot believe it 


- 3 - 



because it was not trvc. One of the men asked ; " 

me if I loved ay husband, If that's why I was taking 
this stand, Ihe other said I realized she's acting 
this way, I would want my wife to act the sane way, 

I can understand it. 


"I asked whore my husband was, they (Page 
eight) told ce he was in their office, I said was he 
under arrest? They said that when they had left the 
office about one o'clock, he had not been under arrest* 


"I said (last two words crossed out) They 
said, would you corroborate this if you heard it 
from your husband? I said I x*-ented to see my husband, 
and then I would say ncthlr.fT without a law^'er. One 

Tully, called th.? FBI of'ice to find out 


cf Ihe r^en, Tully, called t>v? iri;I 
if it were nossl-l^ for ne tc see 


Dave, He was told 


thst D?v« Wsis rrt vr2oT arrest, and was being held in 


the custody of the marshal, Ko one could see him then 
but that later that day he was to be moved to the 
Federal House cf Detention, I said I'm sorry, I had 
nothing fiirther to say to them, (Page six E) 


9 


"They asked me if I know a ran named Frank 
Kessler and I said no, I had never heard of him. They 
asked if I had ever heard of a ran Frank Martin, 
said no — “ 


It will be noted that the above statement 
contains substantially the aa®e Information she 
furrlshed orally to our agents during the interview 
on June 16, 1950, which Is set forth in the report of 
Special Agent John W, lewis, dated June 26, 195o, at 
Kew York, captioned "David Creenglass, was,, Espionage - 
R," which was disseminated to the Department on July 11, 
1950, It will be recalled that Ruth Creenglass initially 
refused to furnish any information pertinent to this 
case, Hovrever, after consulting with her husband and 
attorney she became cccferetive. 


Greeny Less hss else eivis-d t;'c.L on 
*’'ri.l 19^3 j ber’^ord Or^ven^l ass, P'svj hT"'t''er, 

tel erhor leal i V corterted her and insisted cr seeing her 
that , he state-] he n&d q ccnfer-erce with 

David P'^ssrherp, brothei* of dulius Rcseriberg, end it 
was »-"cnssary he "get soTethiin.- ^rcr her teni^'it." 

She aiv^sen him she had roth!ne to him for David 

fic vO’ipce'’ • 


- <+ - 


Bernal^ requests that ahe wait until ha 
talked with her as David Rosenberg was ’’seeing the . . 
light and coming over to our side” and pointed out 
It was wgent to talk to her because of the iBiminence 
of the sjupreme Court decision. She thereafter met- 
him In th© ©vonlng snd h© told lior D©vld Ros6nb€rg 
wanted to know where she end her husband obtained the 
money to pay legal fees to Rcgge. Bernard stated he 
advised David Rosenberg that Julius Rosenberg gave 
fH.OOO to David and Ihith Greenglass. Bernard then 
told Ruth that David Rosenberg wanted to know If 
Ruth had received a letter from her husband In which 
the latter said he wanted Julius and Ethel Rosenberg 
to admit their guilt and cooperate with the Government. 
David Rosenberg wanted Ruth to turn over the letter 
to hlra so that he could visit Julius and Ethel at 
Sing Sing Prison and persuade them to confess. Ruth 
has advised that she refused to turn over such a letter 
or any other letter, telling Bernard that she did not 
knov whet i3S0 Emar.xiel Ploch (the Kose^iber^ attorney) 
would nake of such a letter. Later that evening, 

Bernard arein visited hc-r and told her that he had 
talked to David Rosenberg and told him of Ruth's refusal 
to turn over any letter to him. Da^ld Rosenberg told 
Bernard that he did not require an entire letter and 
that a small portion of any letter Ruth had recently 
received from her husband would be sufficient. Ruth 
advised Bernard that under no circumstances would she 
give any letter, but that any time David Rosenberg 
wished to speak to her about the case she would be glad 
to do so and even show him the letter from her husband, 
but she would not permit the letter cut of her possessloi 


Ruth Greenglass further advised that Bernard 
also asked his rrother^ Krs# Tessie (ireenplass^ to turn 
oyer to him any letters she had received from Davifi end 
she refused to do so* , . \ . 

From the foregoing, it appeays that David 
Rosenberg is attempting to obtain known handwriting - 
specimens of David Greenglass for cbmparlscn by a 
handwriting expert with the statecej^t of the latter 

appearing in the French nress, 

\ 

\ 

\ 

- 5 - 




\ 

\ 


Ruth Crcenglass has also advised that she 
has been negotiating through her attorney with Victor 
Lasky, co-author of the book "Seeds of Treason" for 

the publication of a book recounting her experiences 
In tnis case. 

conf of conversa- 
tion between Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, their relatives, 
iiinanuel iloch, arid Dr* Saul Miller has teen as to how to 
put pressure on Bernard Greenrlass to get him to submit 
an affidavit that David Creeufrlass had stolen tools en d 
uranium from both Fort Crd, California, and Los Alamos, 

New Mexico* During s visit by one of the Bosenbergs* 
relatives, Ethel Rosenberg made the statement that Dr. 
uocrge E rnharlt, Government vltness^bad confided to 
a frienl he had carjured himself during' the tr^al 

because he v£s afraid cf whet the P.F.I, would do to 
him. It will he recalled that Dr, Bernhardt testified 
at the trial concerning a telephone conversation he 

Julius Rosenberg when the latter asked him about 
what Innoculations were necessary for a person to visit 
Mexico, Dr, Saul Miller is reportedly working with Eloch 
In an effort to secure from Dr, Bernhardt an affidavit 
alleging his perjured testimony. 

. SBBBHBBBBI further advised that during 
their conversation, Ethel and Julius, Bloch, and Dr, 

..fiul hillAr^, ccnstantly referred in the most disparaging 
fashion to President Elsenhower, Secretary of State Dulles, 
all cfflciels cf the Coverrment, and, particularly, to 
the F,F,I, Ihey have called President Elsenhower a "gutter 
snipe in striped pants." The same epithet has been used 
to describe Hr. Dulles, who has also been described as a 
"privileged Fascist dog." 


Ihie Hosenbergs are reported to be aporehensl 
of the fcrthcomlng S'upreme Ccupt decision because of t 
International sitv’ttion arvi t>e return of the Ko’^ean 
pris cf v;cr. 


ve 
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H 20 


DIRECTOR 


FROM NEW YORK 
URGENT 


10-27 PM 


A 


^'Lv 


. Mr. Tolan n 



^ Mr. Glavin 

Mr. Harbo 

• Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Tracy 

Mr. G^arty 

Mr. 

Mr. ^V^’it^rrowd- 

Trl«, Room 

Mr. h. 1:« ji'ian 

Mr. Sizoo 

^liss Gandy 


JULIUS ROSENBERG, ETAL, ESP DASH R. RUTH GREENGLASs/^^I^D T^hp^. \ 

today that her brother-in-law, BERNARD GREENGLA&S HAD JUST TELEPHONIC^ 
ADVISED HER AT WORK THAT HE MUST SEE HER TONIGHT AT HER RESIDENCE 
IMMEDIATELY AFTER WORK. HE STATED THAT HE JUST HAD A CONFERENCE WITH 
DAVID ROSENBERG, BROTHER OF JULIUS ROSENBERG, AND IT WAS NECESSARY /. 

that -he get something from her tonight*, she advised him that she!^" 

HAD nothing to GIVE TO HIM FOR DAVID ROSENBERG. BERNARD STATED 
(TO WAIT UNTIL HE TALKS WITH HER AS DAVID ROSENBERG IS -SEEING THE 
light AND COMING OVER TO OUR SIDE-. SHE ADVISED HIM THAT IT SEEMS 
.PRETTY LATE IN THE GAME FOR DAVID ROSENBERG TO BE CHANGING AND THAT 
A DECISION IN THE ROSENBERG CASE IS EXPECTED DAILY. BERNARD ADVISED 
that IT IS BECAUSE OF THE IMMINENCE OF THE ROSENBERG SUPREME COURT 
DECISION THAT IT IS SO URGENT HE TALK TO HER TONIGHT. STATEMENT 
OF RUTH GREENGLASS PREPARED FOR Oi JOHN ROGGE IN NINETEEN FIFTY STILL 
IN POSSESSION OF RUTH GREENGLASS. WILL BE PICKED UP TONIGHT BY A 
BUREAU AGENT PRIOR TO VISIT OF BERNARD GREENGLASS. RUTH GREENGLASS 
WILL ADVISE NYO OF CONVERSATION WITH BERNARD GREENGLASS. ^ 

ml ^ RECORDED *2 ^§3-2^^ '^^?a rdman 


Mh) 22 1^3 1 ^ 

COPIES DESTROYED .^f . UIy'CLAC.HI ' 

4t30 NOVlOidtiO 








FEOtMl tURCAU OF INVESTtCATION 
(I. 8. OCFARTMENT OF iUSnCE 

COMiliuNiCATiflIIS SECTION 



j 




ar. 

[r. Ladd 
Mr. Xitjiols. 

^ o n 



\ Harbo 

Mr. K:>sen 

Mr. Tracy.. 

Mr. Gearty... 




Mr. Mohr .,-. — 

I Mr. W inter rowd 

Tele. Room 

Mr. HoUomAn _ 

■— T^-T 

Misa Gandy. 

HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFIED 

DATE _:?»aV-»< ^ 

•f 

JULIUS ROSENBERG, ESP-R. RUTK GREENGLASS ADVISED TONIGHT, APWL 
THIRTY, THAT BERi\iARD GREENGLASS TOLD HER THAT DAVID ROSENBERG 
WANTED TO KNOW WHERE SHE AND HER HUSBAND, DAVID, OBTAINED THE MONEY 
TO PAY LEGAL FEES TO ROGGE, BERNARD GREENGLASS TOLD HER THAT HE 
TOLD DAVID ROSENoERG THAT JULIUS ROSENBERG GAVE FOUR THOUSAND '/ ' / 

DOLLARS TO DAVID AND RUTH GREENGLASS, BERNARD TOLD RUTH THAT 
DAVID ROSENBERG WANTED TO KNOW IF RUTK HAD RECEIVED A LETTER /) 
from her husband, DAVID, IN WHICH THE LATTER SAID HE WANTED 
JULIUS AND ETHEL TO ADMIT THEIR GUILT AND COOPERATE WITH THE 
GOVERNMENT. DAVID ROSENBERG WANTED RUTH TO TURN OVER SUCH 
LETTER TO HIM'SO THAT. HE COULD VISIT JULIUS AND ETHEL AT SING SING 
and PERSUADE THEM TO CONFESS NO MATTER WHAT THEY DID. RUTH RE- 
FUSED TO TURN OVER SUCH LETTER OR ANY OTHER LETTER, TELLING 
BERNARD THAT SHE DID NOT KNOW WHAT USE BLOCH WOULD MAKE OF SUCH 
letter. SHE ADVISED THAT BERNARD GREENGLASS TOLD HER THAT HE EX- 
PECTED TO BE IN CONTACT WITH DAVID ROSENBERG AGAIN AND THAT HE' 

WOULD TELL RUTH OF THE RESULTS OF THIS CONTACT. RUTH WILL BE ' 
INTERVIEWED AT NOON, MAY ONE, FIFTYTHREE. THE BUREAU WILL BE 
ADVISED OF THE RESULTS OF THIS CONTACT WITH RUTH. 


, A 

' 

END 0:'" 


-2^ AM. OK FBI WA DP RtUUKUtD - 2 


EOARDMAN 

Or- 

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/ 


/ 


reOERAl BUREAU OF IBVESTOAT10W 
U. S. OEPARrMOlT OF JOSflCE 

COMilMUTIIIIIS SECnpil 

MAY iSm 




^:Ir. CjliKTgJ 



Harbo 

J»Ir. 

[ Tracy 

^ ’^<41. u »* 

Jlohr^ 

Mr* V/interrowd. 

Koom 

Mr. Kollr'inan 

Mr. Sizoo 

Miss Gandy 


¥ !,• * * 2 !.; ♦» * 
* %A. • 


“j 







-\»'*rT .-1 






'l-itiED 


^SH 17 FROM NEW YORK 
DIRECTOR URGENT 


8-05 PM 




tc, 



// 

9 

JULIUS ROSENBERG, ETAL, ESP DASH R. RUTH GREENGLASS ADVISED TODAY THAT 

i 

AFTER BERNARD GREENGLASS VISITED HER'LAST NIGHT HE AGAIN RETURNED 

ABOUT TEN THIRTY PM, HE TOLD HER THAT HE HAD SPOKEN ON THE PHONE WITH 

DAVID ROSENBERG AND TOLD HIM THAT RUTH HAD TOO MANY LETTERS TO LOOK 

THROUGH TO FIND ONE THAT WOULD CONTAIN A PLEA BY HER HUSBAND, DAVID 

GREENGLASS, TO JULIUS AND ETHEL TO COOPERATE WITH THE BUREAU, 

♦ 

HE FUTHER ADVISED THAT HE TOLD DAVID ROSENBERG THAT RUTHIE WOULD NOT 
GIVE HIM ANY SUCH LETTER THAT SHE MIGHT FIND SINCE SHE DID NOT TRUST Hlh 
OR BLOCH, DAVID ROSENBERG TOLD BERNARD THAT HE DID NOT REQUIRE AN 
ENTIRE LETTER BUT THAT ONLY A SMALL PORTION OF A LETTER WOULD BE 
SUFFICIENT, OR ANY LETTER RUTH HAD RECENTLY RECEIVED FROM DAVID WOULD 
BE SUFFICIENT, BERNARD ADVISED RUTH THAT HE TOLD DAVID ROSENBERG THAT 


HE WOULD CONVEY THIS MESSAGE TO HER, BERNARD ALSO TOLD RUTH THAT 
COPIES DESTROYED . //-y<? 

.ae NOV 10 1960 "Otn.p r^'i ?/ — /Cv w 


MOV 10 1960 
END page ONE^ 

IlfAV doTJ: 






■rV MAY 22195! 


I 


3 105 ? 


PAGE TWO 


HE AND DAVID ROSENBERG AGAIN DISCUSSED THE QUESTION OF WHERE RUTH GOT THE 
MONEY TO PAY HER ATTORNEY FEES, BERNARD STATED HE TOLD DAVID ROSENBERG 
THAT JULIUS ROSENBERG GAVE HER THE MONEY FOR THE COUNSEL FEES AND THAT 
BOTH DAVID AND RUTH HAD SO TESTIFIED IN COURT, FURTHER THAT DAVID ROSEN- 
BERGjCOULD PROVE THIS BY READING THE TRIAL RECORD, A COPY OF WHICH HE HAD 
FURNISHED TO BERNARD GREENGLASS, BERNARD ADVISED THAT DAVID ROSENBERG SaIo 
THAT HE BELIEVED THE GOVERNMENT HAD BEEN SUPPORTING RUTH AND HAD BEEN 
PAYING HER FOR HER TESTIMONY, BERNARD SAID THAT WAS RIDICULOUS, RUTH 
GREENGLASS STATED TODAY THAT SHE AGAIN TOLD BERNARD GREENGLASS THAT SHE 
WOULD NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES GIVE A LETTER TO BERNARD TO GIVE TO 
DAVID ROSENBERG, SHE TOLD BERNARD THAT AT ANY TIME DAVID ROSENBERG 
WISHED TO SPEAK TO HER ABOUT THE CASE SHE WOULD BE GLAD TO DO SO AND 
EVEN SHOW HIM A LETTER FROM DAVID STATING THAT JULIUS AND ETHEL COOPERATI ’ 
BUT UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES WOULD SHE PERMIT THIS LETTER OUT OF HER 
POSSESSION, BERNARD ALSO TOLD RUTH THAT HE DISCUSSED WITH DAVID ROSENBERft i 
THE POSSIBILITY OF A DECISION IN THE SUPREME COURT ON MAY FOURTH NEXT, 
DAVID ROSENBERG STATED THAT HE BELIEVED THAT THE DECISION WOULD BE 
against the ROSENBERGS but that there was still time for HIM TO OBTAIN 


END PAGE TWO 


PAGE THREE 


A LETTER FROM RUTH AND TAKE IT TO SING SING TO CONFRONT JULIUS^ WITH IT AVO 
GET HIM TO CONFESS, RUTH TOLD BERNARD THAT SHE WOULD HAVE NOTHING TO DO 
WITH DAVID EXCEPT AS EXPRESSED ABOVE, SHE FURTHER ADVISED THAT LAST 
EVENING AFTER HER IN^RVIEW WITH A NY AGENT, HER MOTHER-IN-LAW, MRS, 

TESSIE GREENGLASS, CALLED HER ON THE PHONE AND TOLD HER THAT BERNARD 
GREENGLASS HAD ASKED HER TO TURNOVER TO HIM ANY LETTER THAT SHE HAD 
RECEIVED FROM DAVID SO THAT HE COULD TURN IT OVER TO DAVID ROSENBERG, 

MRS, TESSIE GREENGLASS TOLD RUTH THAT SHE WOULD NOT GIVE ANYTHING TO 
BERNARD AND SO ADVISED HIM, MRS, GREENGLASS TOLD RUTH THAT SHE, TOO, 
SHOULD NOT GIVE ANYTHING TO BERNARD TO GIVE TO DAVID ROSENBERG NOR SHOULD 
SHE SAY ANYTHING TO BERNARD THAT HE COULD RELAY TO DAVID ROSENBERG, 

RUTH GREENGLASS SAID THAT DURING THIS CONVERSATION WITH HER MOTHER-LAW 
THE LATTER ON SEVERAL OCCASIONS VEHEMENTLY STATED THAT SHE WOULD NEVER 
TURN ANYTHING OVER TO DAVID ROSENBERG BECAUSE SHE KNEW IT WOULD ONLY 
BE USED BY EMANUEL BLOCH FOR ANOTHER PURPOSE, THE BUREAU IS ADVISED THAT . 
A CHECK OF THE ACCOUNT OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE ROSENBERGS 
AT THE CHASE NATIONAL BANK, TIMES SQ, BANK, NYC, DISCLOSES THAT A CHECK 
DATED MARCH TWENTY-SEVEN LAST IN THE AMOUNT OF FIFTY DOLLARS WAS CHARGED ' 
TO THIS ACCOUNT ON APRIL ONE LAST, THE PAYEE OF THIS CHECK WAS CASH 


END PAGE THREE 


PAGE FOUR 


AND THIS CHECK WAS CASHED AT THE CHASE BANK. THE FACE OF THE CHECK 

BORE A NOTATION ’’WASHINGTON/ D.C. EXPENSES FOR DAVE ROSENBERG”, RENYTEL 

/ 

MAY ONE FIPTYTHREE, RE PREVIOUS INTERVIEW WITH RUTH GREENGLASS, IT 
NOW APPEARS ALMOST CERTAIN THAT THE ONLY PURPOSE OF DAVE ROSENBERG IN 
OBTAINING A PART OF A LETTER WRITTEN BY DAVID GREENGLASS IS FOR THE 
PURPOSE OF COMPARISON BY A HANDWRITING EXPERT AS SUGGESTED IN RETEL. 

RUTH GREENGLASS FURTHER ADVISED THAT SHE HAS BEEN NEGOTIATING THROUGH 
HER ATTORNEY, 0, JOHN ROGGE, WITH VICTOR LASKY FOR THE PUBLICATION OF A 
BOOK RECOUNTING HER EXPERIENCES IN THIS CASE, IT IS NOTED THAT THIS 
VICTOR LASKY AND RALPH DE TOLEDANO WERE CO-AUTHORS OF THE BOOK 
ENTITLED ”SEEDS OF TREASON”, RUTH ADVISED THAT SHE HAD NOT COME TO A 
DECISION IN THIS MATTER AND WOULD ADVISE THIS OFFICE WHEN SHE DOES, IT 
IS NOTED THAT THE ’’DAILY WORKER" ON PAGE TWO OF THE ISSUE OF MAY ONE 


END PAGE roUR 


PGAE FIVE 


ilCP 

INSTANT ANNOUNCES THAT THE CONSOLE TABLE WILL BE EXHIBITEB AT THE RALLY 
AT RANDALLS IS* ON MAY THIRD NEXT* FURTHER THAT 



CONFIDENTI* 


ally ADVISED TODAY THAT IT IS LIKELY THAT MICHAEL AND ROBERT ROSENBERG, 
CHILDREN OR JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG, WILL BE INTRODUCED DURING THIS 
RALLY. BUREAU WILL BE ADVISED OF FURTHER CONTACTS WITH RUTH GREENGLAES. 

BOARDMAN 


HOLD 




r - 







4 


f^^Jf 


FEDCRAL BUREAU OF IffVESTiGATION 
U. S. OEPARTMEKT OF JUSTICE 

COMmUNICATIBNS section 


i. 


MAY 1 

all INFCrJ'IATIOi: CONTAINED.,,'"^’ ^ / 
HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFIED x - 


herein IS UNCLASSIFIED 

7’»V'Sf BY jgy^ 

FROM NEW YORK 


/ 


5-25 P 


I RECTOR 


URGENT 



f I"-. ' 


f L. 1*. - . s J 

I rrs,;, ; 


r 'rr'.v’-^ 

I ^ ' ''. r . -o 9 

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f . * • ■ 't'' r> I 

I i «'. • 5 '--; 

I ■ ■ r 








i ATTENTION - INSPECTOR HENNRICHR ^ /I yi 

: j (i. ^ t ' CV 

,i JULIUS ROSENBERG, ET AL, ESPIONAGE DASHxfrTIHlI^H^ A ^ 

CONFIDENTIALLY ADVISED TODAY OF A PROPOSED 
VISIT or DAVID ROSENBERG TO JULIUS AND ETHEL, HE STATED HE ^ 
j WOULD REPORT THE RESULTS Or THIS VISIT IMMEDIATELY, HE >^' ' 

CONFIDENTIALLY ADVISED THAT THE MAIN TOPICS OF CONVERSATION BETWEEN 
JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG AND THEIR RELATIVES AND EMANUEL BLOCH AND 
DR, SAUL MILLER HAVE BEEN HOW TO PLAY UP THE BREACH BETWEEN 
5 BERNARD GREENGLASS AND HIS WIFE AND HOW TO PUT PRESSURE ON 

I BERNARD TO GET HIM TO SUBMIT AN AFFIDAVIT THAT DAVID GREENGLASS 

* 

« 

j HAD STOLEN TOOLS AND URANIUM FROM BOTH FT, ORD, CALIF,. AND 

I LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, DURING A VISIT BETWEEN ETHEL GOLDBERG 
i / AND ETHEL ROSENBERG, THE LATTER STATED THAT DR, BERNHARD HAD 

RECENTLY CONFIDED TO A FRIEND THAT HE PERJURED HIMSELF DURING THE 
trial BECAUSE HE WAS AFRAID OF WHAT THE FBI WOULD DO TO HIM, IT 
IS NOTED THAT DR, BERNHARDT TESTIFIED AT THE TRIAL CONCERNING 

I 

THE TELEPHONE CONVERSATION HE HAD WITH JULIUS ROSENBERG WHEN THE 
LATTER ASKED HIM ABOUT WHAT INNOCULATIONS WERE NECESSARY FOR 

am PAGE ONE^^ . RECORDED -2 S 1 ^ 4 ^ 

COPIES W/-3IQS3 " 

426 NOV 10 ijyU C r , . ' 


J 

V--.' 


J 


4 


9 


WA 16 PAGE TWO 

A PERSON TO VISIT MEXICO ETC. DR, SAUL MILLER TOLD ETHEL 
ROSENBERG THAT HE HEARD ABOUT DR, BERNHARDT-S STATEMENT TO A 

I FRIEND, BUT THAT HE DID NOT QUITE BELIEVE IT, HE STATED THAT 
HE WOULD CONTACT BLOCH AND WOULD WORK WITH BLOCH IN AN EFFORT 
TO GET DR, BERNHARDT TO SUBMIT AN AFFIDAVIT ALLEGING HIS PERJURED 
TESTIMONY, UNLESS ADVISED TO THE CONTRARY BY THE BUREAU, 

NEW YORK WILL NOT INTERVIEW DR, BERNHARDT OR TAKE ANY OTHER ACTION 
IN THIS REGARD FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS, IF DR, BERNHARDT SHOULD 
SUBMIT SUCH AN AFFIDAVIT, HE WOULD MAKE HIMSELF LIABLE FOR A PERJURY 
PROSECUTION, IF HE WAS INTERVIEWED, HE COULD ALLEGE SUCH INTERVIEW 
AS ADDED EVIDENCE OF THE FACT THAT THE FBI HAD THREATENED HIM, 

THE SOURCE OF THIS INFORMATION MUST NOT BE ENDANGERED UNDER 
ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, ^||||||^||||[||^^ ADVISED DURING THEIR pc-v 

'conversations ETHEL AND JULIUS, BLOCH, AND SAUL MILLER CONSTANTLY 
REFERRED IN THE MOST DISPARAGING FASHION TO PRESIDENT EISENHOWER, 
SECRETARY OF STATE DULLES, ALL OFFICIALS OF THE GOVERNMENT, AND, 
j PARTICULARLY, TO THE FBI. THEY HAVE CALLED PRESIDENT EISENHOWER 
"A GUTTERSNIPE IN STRIPED PANTS", THE SAME EPITHET HAS BEEN 'USED 
TO DESCRIBE MR, DULLES AND HE HAS FURTHER BEEN DESCRIBED AS A 

"PRIVILEGED FASCIST DOG’*, BOTH ETHEL AND JULIUS ROSENBERG ARE 
1 END PAGE TWO 


4 







WA 16 PAGE THREE 

APPREHENSIVE OF THE FORTHCOMING SUPREME COURT DECISION BECAUSE OF THE 
INTERNATIONAL SITUATION AND THE RETURN OF THE PRISONERS OF WAR, 

ETHEL REFERRED TO THE NEWSPAPERS AS THE "FILTHY PRESS" BECAUSE 
THEY HAVE DESCRIBED SOME OF THE RETURNING PRISONERS OF WAR AS 
COMMUNISTS BECAUSE THESE PRISONERS "HAVE SEEN THE JOY OF LIVING UNDER 
A REAL SYSTEM", THE BUREAU WILL BE PROMPTLY ADVISED OF ANY FURTHER 
INFORMATION RECEIVED PPOM ilcyp 


BOARDMAN 


END 


NY R 16 WA NRB 

VMOTT 


IM 


CO; ® 


f r! 


NY HAS LINE WA FLS ROO 


Office • UNITED ||a}eS GOVERNMENT 


h'' 




» A* F* Belmont 



DATZi May 13 j 1953 


niOM t c» E, He n 


•OBJECT: JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG 


]/ 


Tolsoo 





PM- 
GlBTia. 
fUrbo. 
Rom*. 
Tr»cy > 
Gmty . 
liohr^ 


^■terrovrd-. 
Tele. Rooai^ 
HoUcNMe...^ 
Stto 

Min findy — 


ASAC Whelan of the New York Office advised on 
May 13, 1953, that Judge Kaufman loas contacted on 
Monday, May 11, 1953, and briefed concerning the new 
statements which have recently been published and the 
facts surrounding the theft of copies of these statements 
from the office of defense attorney, 0» John Rogge ^ 

Judge Kaufman expressed his appreciation to 
I the Bureau for keeping him advised regarding this matter* 


A CTIONs 


For your information* 


, / 

/ / 

/ ' 


f T '«■ \ ’< ‘n ?/ % ' -r r T' r-' ' 'r« / r *. ^ 

i)ATE___7 -av- ijV 3oVa PwrjW 


6^. r f ^ 

^ .'«( ~a.l8S8 


/ 6 // 


CO - Mr, Branigan 
Mr, Litrento 

CEHseme rJh 





Office yUmorandum 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 


TO t 
FROM t 
SUBJECT: 


TEE DIRECTOR 
D» Dadd 


JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG 


DATE: 

Nay 8, 1953 



At 4il0 p*m» I telephonioally contacted SAC 
Boardman of the New York Office* I advised, him that 
you had been talking with Judge Irving Kaufman in 
connection with the Ros enberg case, and that you 
thought it would be desirable for the New York Offi^ 
to have one of the officials who was familiar with 
the recent developments in that case contact Judge 
Kaufman and orally brief him concerning the new 
statements which have recently been published, and, 
as to the facts surrounding the theft of copies of 
these statements from the office of the defense 
attorney , 0, John Rogge* 



K— g # 

OMidy 



I told Nr* Boardman in contacting the Judge 
to advise him that he is being contacted in accordance 
with the Director's instructions and in line with his 
conversation with the Director, in order to orally 
brief him concerning these latest developments * 


mLsCSH 







KECORDED ■ 118 






4-750 (Rev. 4-17-85) 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
FOlPA DELETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET 


t 


Page(8) withheld entirely at this location in the file, 
indicated, explain this deletion. 


One or more of the following statements, where 



Deleted under exemptionts) 
material available for release 


IL 

to you. 


with no segregable 


□ Infonnation pertained only to a third party with no reference to you or the subject of your request 
O Informaticm pertained only to a third party. Your name is listed in the title only. 

□ Documents originated with another Government agency(ies). These documents were referred to that 
agency(ies) for review and direct response to you. 


Pages contain information furnished by another Government agency(ies). You will be advised by the FBI as 
to the releasability of this information following our consultation with the other agency(ies). 


Pagels) withheld for the following reasonls): 



LJ For your infonnation: 




The follovmg imi^r is to be used for reference regarding these pages: 

UJ - -IL , 4 4 


XXXXXX 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 


S DELETED PAGE(S) X 
X NO DUPLICATION FEE v 
X FOR THIS PAGE X 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 


PBI/DOJ 




v'« — ■ m 

■ • > 

I 










^5-58236 


^tiSJSS® 




Date I 


Tot 


S' ^ 

Way 12, 1953 

legal Attache 
Faria, France 


- AIR COCRIER ; ;; 


N •; i 

f 


Frost Direetcr, FBI 

r*- 

Subject: JULICS R03-2.BSRG, et al 
ESPICKAGS - R 


Re your cable 5~6»53* Ihe oeaorandus of David Creenglaaa 
appearing in Ue french press is an authentic copy of a statec>ent 
in the handwriting of Greenglass which was aade shortly after his 
arrest at the specific re<jJ9st of his attorney, C. John Rogge, «ho 
waiited to know the gist of ttie stateioent Greenglass had giver, to the 
V FBI at the tin-a of his arrest. 




Cn 4~*29~53, inquiry was mads of Rogge's office as to the 
^isreabouts of the original statement* A Rogge associate made a 
search of the Greenglass file in his office on that day and failed to 
locate the statesent* Cn 4‘~30~53, the original statement turned up 
in Rogge's file* lie, Rogge has asde the statement that the original 
isesorandua of Greenglass appeared to have been "filched" from his 
file and thereafter returned* 

Hhsamel Bloch, attorney for the Rosenbergs, has disclaimed 
any knowledge as to the theft of this stateioent and claims that the 
first he knew of it T;as when lie received a cablegram irom Paul Villard^'^ 
a French attorney. 

V.* 

Ihe foregoing is for your information* 


cc - 1 - Foreign Service Desk 
APLiblb / ' * A 


... 






MP 


sOl' 


Tel*. hOOQ 


■m. 


LE©AT 

1 G MAY 1 4 

• COMM.fSt 


r./> 3 .rv," !^J /t V- 

oi ijyciiVc'^AAitaliiin indeiiiiiic 


- I 
V 





; 


Wt BUREAU 0 ' W/ESt:.;' 

\ 8. DEPAaTK:.sT cf rj3*!:£ 

•' IMMUillMTiOMS StSTiC:) 

lyiAf 1 

TSLETY^E 


O 


Mr. ^laoTL 
MrT L^(L 
Mr. k/cI: 



5-1-53 



fchols 

I MryT-dmontJ 

Clegg 

Glavin 

Jlr. Hnrbo. 



I r 

i -Ir. Tracy.. 

I Mi’. G '^arty. 

; :Mr. :u.hT 

^.i r. V/i;-itorro';v-J_ 

:le. U:>om 

lur. Hi Unman 

Mr. Sizno 

Mlii^Gandv 





Tcir 


H IS FROM NEW YORK 
DIRECTOR URGENT 

-•'-N 

JULIUS ROSENBERG, ETAL,, ESP-l(, RENYTEL THIS DATE WHICH CONTAINED INFO 
confidentially RECEIVED from about THE EFFORTS BEING MaIeK' 

TO SECURE AN AFFIDAVIT FROM DR, GEORGE BERNHARDT TO THE EFFECT THAT 
PERJURED HIMSELF WHEN HE TESTIFIED DURING INSTANT TRIAL, REFERENCE IS 
MADE TO LA TEL DATED MARCH TWENTYI^IVE LAST WHICH RECITES THAT' 

/WAS ADVISED BY 





THAT ORIGINAL 

STATEMENTS GIVEN THE FBI BY RUTH AND DAVID GREENGLASS KA^ fefl? SECURED 
AT A COST OF TWENTYFIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND THAT FOR ANOTHER TWENTY- 
!• n/E THOUSAND DOLLARS THEY WILL HAVE IN THEIR POSSESSION A 
statement for CONFESSION OF PERJURED WITNESS/ SOUNDED TO INFORMANT LIKE 
PHILIP PERLMAN," IT IS SUGGESTED ^OR THE BUREAU-S CONSIDERATION THAT 
THIS LAST NAMED "PHILIP PERLMAN" MAY, IN ^’ACT, BE DR, GEORGE BERNHARDT, 
t)^STRWED ^ ^ logical ON THE BASIS OF THE INEO RECEIVED FROM y 

/■ ^ 5 *-«tJPERFisoa 


J. } 

if/'. 

HOLD 




— BOARDMAN 




Si wS. '953 


I 



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R •Bl'"-'' '' «MEN« 

espionage - *• EHt STATtM 

.UUUS^OStNBPPO. Bt B ,.V>TI«C St« 

gseen'^'-^®® '‘” s^ibst 5 text op the 

TsHOVIIN'^ \'’,ErT^ISENHOH« B'' ^ 

1 sprtemehts BTI-^ ''• RtC0R0®-«\i^^-73 ,9a jP 

\ SIX POB C'Cr^o ,.^ * ^ It '‘ltjj<^ 

holdpi-s ; , . 

X. ^ 


6-58 ? 


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- • * '♦ 


4-750 (Rev. 4-17-85) 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
FOlPA DELETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET 


Page(s) withheld entirely at this location in the file. One or more of the following statements where 
indicated, explain this deletion. ’ 


□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


Deleted under exemption(s) 

material available for release to you. 


with no segregable 


Information pertained only to a third party with no reference to you or the subject of your request. 

Information pertained only to a third party. Your name is listed in the title only. 

Documents originated with another Government agency(ies). These documents were referred to that 
agency(ies) for review and direct response to you. 


Pages contain iriformation furnished by another Government agency(ies). You will be advised by the FBI as 
to the releasability of this information following our consultation with the other agency(ies). 


Page(s) withheld for the following reason(s): 




For your information: 





The following number is to te used for reference regarding these pages- 

c..r -,r 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

S DELETED PAGE(S) X 
X NO DUPLICATION FEE v 
X FOR THIS PAGE X 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 


PBI/DOJ 


May 14, 1953 


SAG, Mew Tork (65^1S34a) 


Mireoter, FBI (6S^5e296) 




JULIOS ROSEMBERG, ST AL 
^lOMAGSyB ^ , 



^ BeButel dated May 1, 1953, 




The Crintnal Division of the Department has 
advised the United States Attorney for the Southern 
District of Mew Tork to channel all requests for information 
for representatives of the State Department here and abroad 
regarding this case through the Department for coordination, 
since representatives of the State Department in Washington 
are also in contact with the Department concerning this 
natter* 


The foregoing is for your information* 


AFLsawn 




ALL iN :■ •, cc T -r-2D 


Ml«on_ 

l«dd 


netolB 

Belaont^ 

al* ■'* r 

rfCJ' ^ 

4 - . 





• I 


yr ■ . ; ■ : 

/C i k *. w 'wi 




4 


NO.M 




STANOARO 






Officf MemorandMm 




UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 


TO 


director, FBI ATT: INSPECTCHl HQINRICH 


DATE: $/k/^3 


y j WoM : SAC, NEW YORK (65-l$3U8) 

■ 4 ■ c9 

SUBJECT: JULIUS ROSENBERG, was, et al 
ESP-H 

Renytel $/l4/$3» 

There is forwarded herewith for information of 
of R, H. GOLDMAN dated 6/19/50 and copy of a memorandum of 

dated $/\if$3. This last memorandum refers to a conference had this day between 
EMANUEL BLOCH, 0. JOHN ROGGE and FABRICANT. 


Enc-2 (Registered Mail 
Special Delivery) 


JAHtIM 



1 - 65-15336 



RtCORBEO - 1« 



y 


J 


M . E M 0 






■ 








-V. ^ 




TO: . 
PROM : 


.PILE 

HJP 


5/4/53 


'‘-f n ‘ 


t t 


: •• Re: -, Greenglass 


.At approximately 10:45 this moimilhg while walking through’ . 
the lobby of our office I noticed' Emanual Block and a Chinese 
girl got off the elevator. He asked me whether Mr. Rogge ' 
was in and said he was expected and asked me to come in to 
Rogge's room with him. He took out an issue of the New York 
Times of today's date and of the Daily Worker, both of which 

the Greenglass case. ./ _ > , ; r 






- 






He came up for. the ostensible and declared purpose of - .. - 

^checking whether a handwritten statement that had beenre- 
- prpduppd in the Paris ^papers ' and of which he had photostatic ^ 
fpoples were 'genuine . or spurious. His secretary made notes /-=' 
-;Of -.the .conve'raation. ■ ■ ; ■ 

We. advised him that as far as we 'knew the handwritten statement “ 
was genuine, that it had. been -filched from our files at sS ^ . 

unfeown.date and returned sonie time between Wednesday afternoon 
and Thursday moTOlng. . He told us tiBb '.his first 'knowledge of ^ 
this .document came Iri a^pablegram "from a French attorney named' ^ 
was a^plant^ ^^at his. first suspicion was 'that "this 




'A 


AT 

► .* • -t 'V if*. • *•’1^ 

r ■ •tit 

S - • *’*. • 


- :H6 .a adylsed-.us 6f ahd , showed .to US a photostatic copy 
a 3 pagea) rof what/purpprted to be' an .-'interoffice memorandum' 

..fpm our We confirmed for ourselves, ah^^ for' him that - -fe- w 

copy, of one of our- memoranda. 

.- v~'.He.lndloated that he was. outraged by the activities of all 
H sorts of. political figures .and his committee; .that kis If he didn't 

. . .V. . .i;* ^ the ^ndwrlt. ten statement he would.be bastlga ted by his . ' ’ v 

committee . Prom the legal point ’of view he thought he had 

:.; bTOU^t out "more by cross-examination than appeared In the hand- ' 
written statement. • - ■ . " 

-• ‘.'J ’ ■ . - .AS'-'- .'. _ ... A 

to a'^cohvereiicy held;in .,thl3 .office a few ^ays after 
15 at, which he said that he was present! bhat . the four Of 
f ;_;'f’,';/os were present, and that.;Helen P^gano was present and -took 

♦ :..;Both ..liohn and „I .^isputad'^'his memory, 'lire agreed tthat^#«W^;:t 
r i.. - -«*he four members of bhe fli^, had been nneaen^ kh*- ■■ 




- 2 - 




• .» «. • •■' ^ ■ ■. *- 

: 

t f » - - ■ ' 

s, . \ .*:,■ ,^. • . ’* • *• -'■ 

. four membera of the firm. Block arid' bhe . Were present' 

1' ^ She replied that she could hot remember any 


. r- . - ? > 

"1 ». ^ . - 1 -- 

• . * -. rtT . 


I. -' 'Block ".that he probably was "confusing this' wl't'h another - " ' '• 

fe \.i.' y where he . was preseijt. Interviewing Bernle Greenglass ' ■ 

Helen Pagano' who took ho tea. 
believed in, the ^ilt of his clients; He " 
have continuously denied it': We told Block ’ ” ' 'SI??- - ' 
.been::lntervlewe^d by the" FBI and had surrendered the 
i ^ ^he them; that if we were 

— by thera agalri we would report this cbnversation “ ‘ 


N to do ^p. :. He left at approximately 

■ ^ that he .was ;on pips ‘and needles 'expecting a 

V .-V'-V- ' ' ■ t:^'i .^d^ c is ion from ^the . c our t A t nne ~Tvn in'h 'riiiT»i‘ncT f Ho a vr •ma r, 


i5®°i3loh...£j^omj.the court;'^^^ "point during the conversation 

- ^ 3^ him how did Vlllat^ 'hpnnph -th ' o-or- t-vob^ 

'll -v* C-. ' 


V .. r.:": V’--- ^ O'' vimj. oiic ijuiiyex'a 

?^P°iatedly asked him how did yillai^ happen to get thehe .. 
nhot.fta«^oi-a .jjg firs't stated', 

and then: assumed .that Vlllard got--. ^ 


^ . I. .Ja“' 

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ntOMt RHQ 


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J^n« 19, 1950 


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R»t Da vid 0 r 6 enflp.afla 




OreingUa. at har' hona, 285 

■SSTlI! !l ?0 ‘.S «‘ 5*00 r.K. Sunday,’ 

ttia . Capital,* *"* *^4 Juat ratupned ftom 


>■ -53* 




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Ki««ii4n» IS £f^!* th0 question of arranging a 

at our office to dla^s 

flnanolal proWema. The restive • proposed are as followsi 

* 1 “ •':•■' . Abe Felt . X \ 

. - : Union street ; 

'_ 4 ^ Hew York - 

" 


I ■•‘'l *"''^- •:"..■■■/ '■^‘■^'^iiness Address t 

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810 Washington Street ^ - 
tr ; vfel. ST 3-0^075 iV - 

Tslephones Jacob Cohen & Son 

: 2-7103 

SSflT^r (friend of the family)' 

79°1 Louis street v.-V . - 

Telephone OR 4-3609 . .. 

■ . ■ ’ . • ** ■ >r a**-’'* ^*** 

V 5 ?^*y 2 erkel (A oouslnj ; 

Cast 26th Street ■' 

Telephone I DE 2-0312 .. 

5 » Sam Oreenglass 
1384 Caroll Street 
Telephone t 

Rose Stein (PTlend) 

a' * - • * ' *■ 

Stella Si.lvemah (Friend) 


ijl ■• *« ^ j , _ -a t * "• 

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“"i*d>,'i 9 ii 2 ^ 8 h» 7 *»i«^»SI* Sw^lSS’i. TLSy^S ^i 




ted be^^e ^tbe ^'l^oiMCL 


>1 


F 'S^rj»t;-:i*.'-^jf to* mf taldag'jobi' , _., ..^ _. .„ . 

:;s ^ ■ : by. ;^,;.»oil ■,.<>»* •r»i*»l(jfi".,birfie*I^;^^f' 

^-!- I® '^fr' ■'•he^ ii'tateid. that '1 m iid’'l ''^tendteaw^^^*" 






' V /;-»• 
"*0?^ - 






to ;® '^•*’ oueDanci* aixe abated that he bad i "»tendte 4 - 

bo byfterU*. At ptlw^, t!n»ei ho Would beooM dSlrioS^S^' 

•hwt ^ ^^PP? ^ i'te..^hude throiiji^ the hajliwawi '^-^^J^^^ 


«. •/• » > 


P . r* 


W! • r ^ ^ 


v;.:» 


,. ^ \. . . , » . 


V 

r.-’ 
'i' ^'. 

* V 


. ^ to ^ .^r-rJk'z ^ foroMKa me imliWfcy* ^ 

•hrlehlng of - ;Vlephante", "Lead ..P.ante" • ,‘- .; ■ ,>.• -x. . -■' 

thing! Were |o Oven if thOy Were hot# 

^ ^ were K ehar- abter ih thO'tevlea bui ' 
^ ItW^^y .had beea^ teder OoS^;: 

ma notioed a oar of the Aoaie jCbnatruetiaa Cmpany/ 


fc ''''-ii^r^^- 

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r./ r 


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-.-'is' * ’'. ‘ 

*5' a' “ nv'. ^ >" 


fnJto^S ^ han^ttteb $he oebwtalnetd there waa ho'auoh IbomiJniy* 

^ • 5^ Interviewed at the hea^tal by two m :»eS 

i^v 5»d MX*. Wood. One waa -taU/ xnidVand d^ 

?® toothy and short. Tbi&y aaaurOiS her that - ^ 
they had noth^g against her. She desoribed &er atay in -s-l^ 

ted_atated thet ahe .dould not rehendder all of her 
addreaaes.^ Since it was difficult for OI«a to get mou for 

lived in' five dr aix places. She had 

shi^hJ5'^2to!li V a party for a few hours one dime. 

z2®*.u * reTOi^ered no visitors at her hcuse. She had hot lea 

«nd signed te affidavit for It^ .:She hhew^her 

hot have allowed W.ilmabahd Jo 
orlng teythln .<3 home after Hiroshima had d taalbsavi ‘•W hiii t 

thfl®S5r,S®»; ;i5!- •?«''*“ “p» >«»ii. 




- Vi 


-> v 

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^;2.’ 


t^t kind of^haterlal around, ‘injhe ^Se dlU^ref^i ^ 

everyone to her lawyer. 

She pointed out Dave did npt ask for the 




iv 


that he 




X: 


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- - *-»a. 




- * “- •'>,.''«y-r'*- 

"ry* ■ . ' ■ ■ w ” ‘^b' 


r. • I -» ■ 'J-. 

♦ .♦•• ^ -m ,- •», • • . , ^ • b .«■%»■ T~I n- , # ^ ^V — . . ^7* ■ "to 

People In. the neighborhood want to raiie a 'pe.tititp'«'yfiiC'!^v 


-V . .'^ 


Ar 6 _t 6 Jb 8 P 8 r 6 pp 6 (l ii 8 r. 












.S'* 











9 

A 


•dvloe ^ house to offer support and 

perhaps a rl^t-wlng lawyer should ba 

forward, ahloh la owtitoiy no? a 

lA ^t antl-aemlllo laauo, 

’“e Innocent he ahSSrfal?. if 

??ovritS”Jf,!* to ift thfGo^Jnmfnt 

5J. :i.“'d???;;,ef:t*L^^tS;“"°® cooperation, lhat 


There was a long discussion abour JR, 




^estlons to be looked upi 


>7 . 1 " 4 ^ 

- - :> ,* ..>. - 




/-/ U , 


1 . 


•% ^ 


» -7 • 

iT 

>1 


^ detention 

®®*®i*^* .•he ooraplaL nt issued? 


‘ t * 

a ; V . . 






•? 

» 


£• 

3. 


What la the. effect of the co.^pld.nt? 



^‘.wantt “°*® “ the Intent to harm the 


h* statement a of Co-Conaplrators, 
5» Venue 
Joinder 


1 "■ ' ' . t ^'* 



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I--’ 


Asaistant Attomay Ganoral 
iRarran Olnay III 

Director, FBI 

RECORDED • 143 i>5 “ BW24' 4-1 

JUtlDS ROSEKBSRa, et al 

. ,©?I0«A0B - B • 


May 8, 1953 


ee - lir. Beloont 



W i 




OUvln 


Ulchala. 

Aosar. 


Tracy^ 

■‘arbo 


li >lnonc_ 
Vihr 


■ f*'. 


<* ■ 

« • ' 
V- 


- jf' . 


*5X^1 ROOO^ 

''•^8* 

Gaafly 


‘ Reference is made to oar memorandum of May 6, 1953, oonceming 
the handwritten a tatement prepared hy David Green glaaa in June, 1950, at 

^e cequ^t of hie attorney, 0. John Rogge, a copy of vhioh haa appeared 
In the Frendi preaa* 

***’• Herbert J* Fabrleant, an aaaooiate of Rogge, haa recently 
adviaed that on vay 4, 1953, Ssanuel Bloch, attorney for the Roaenborga, 
WA to RoRge»a office and had a conference with Rogge and Fabrlcant. 

Bloch had with him the May 4, 1953, laaue of the "New lork Tlmea" and a 
-Daily -Worker.- Qa page four of the -New York Timao- there appeared an 
vticle ooneoming a rally held by the Katlonal Comaittee to Seouro 
Justice in the Rosenberg Case at Randall's Island Stadium, Kew York City, 

« May 3^ 1953* The article mentioned that a meaoranduia supposedly mritten 
by Creen^ass was featured at the rally aa "new evidenee." It alao men- 
tioned that Rogge had oonfinaed that there was a handwritten memorandum 
by GreenglMs similar to the docuaant printed in the French newspapers, 
rnis article quoted Rogge aa stating that the original memorandum appeared 
to have been filched" from nis files and had been aissing when the rai 
first inquired about it and then turned up in the files the next day, 

Rogge also reportedly stated that Oreenglaas at first "told part of hie 
stozy to the FBI," and then later gave the rest. 

..u Blooh advised Rogge and Fabrlcant that he was trying to cheek 
vrtiether ^e handwritten statement aj^arlng in the Rrench newspapers ^ 
was genuine. Fabrlcant told Bloch that as far as he knew the statement 

S** If* filched from the files and later returned, «loch 
state that his first knowledge of the statement came to him in a oable>> 
gram from a French attorney, Paul Vlllard, 

^^thsr advised that Bloch exhibited to him a Photostat 
of an in tor-office aeaorandum, written by R, H. Goldman, a former law 
associa^ of Rogge, dated June 19, 1950, for Rogge’s Qree&glasa ftte wldoh 
repor tod an interview Ooldnan had with Ruth Oreenglase three ctofi^aH^r her 

JiS outraged by the eoilvltt^ of 

S Juotloe in the Rosenberg Case but that ^ 

hand^ltten statement mf Ckeenglase, he waad.& casti- 
gated by the ^flmlttoe. Bl«^^ also%tiatod he believed he broug!^' out by'^ 
cross examination more thah appeared in the handwritten a^’tom^, 

A. 


^■KPLihlb 

6% MAY 26 1653 


IK 


\ 


* t r.‘ i 

r;; r 




A A .* 












\ . 

V. 

Pabricant told Blodi that it was hia c^lnion tho Roaenbergi «ora 4[ttiltgr ' ' I 

and should talk to save themselves. Blo<di ansvered that he had asked I 

the Rosenberga on ssore than eight/ ooeaslona to admit their guilt and 
throe themselves on the mere/ of the oourt if they eore eullty. but that 
the Rosenborgs have always maintaiMd ^eir ^ooenoe. . 

Attached hereto are Photostats of the followijig meoMranda . - v • 
idildi have been made available by Ur. Pabrieanti 

(1) Ihter^offioe affnorandum of Mr. Pabriosnt dated 
^^45 A. U»f tPune 16^ 1950. and appexided memwandun 
dated June 16, 1950, reporting the interview with 
Uavid Qroenglass. 

(2) Intsp-^ffice nemorandua of R. H. Qoldnian dated 

June 19, 1950, reporting interview with Ruth Qroenglass. 

(3) Inter-effioe memorandum of Kr, Fabrioant dated Key 4, 

1953, reporting ecmferenet ho and Roggo had with 
Snanuel Bloch. 

In oonneotion with r<oldnian*s soaorandua of Jbno 19, 1950, man* 

Uonad above, a copy of ahloh Is in the possession of Blodi, your attention 
is invited to page two, paragrajha throe and four, thereof, in which Ruth 
Greenglass reportedly atatod "As to her husband, she stated that /he had 
a » tand^cy to hysteria. » At other times he would become delirloue and 
once v^ien he had the grippe he ran nude throu^ the hallway, ehrleklng of 
'elephants,* 'Lead Pants.* She had known him since she was ten years old. 

She said that he wculd say things were so even if th^ were not. Re talked 
of suicide as if he were a character in the movies but she didn't think 

he would do it. Tliey had been under surveillance by the FBI for several “ 
weeks.” 

Ruth CSroenglaas was interviewed on May 6, 1953, oonoornlng the 
forego^g statement, ^a advised that Goldman wanted to know some of her 
husband's backgroind. Shs told Goldman of her eourtahip by Cmvid and her 
marriage. Sie recalled that Bavld had either pneumonia or influensa when 
fifteen or sixteen years of age and that he was alone in an upstairs 
apartxsont. He had a veiy hl^ twiperaturs and whlls In a delirious state 
ran out of the apartment trying to gat hie pajamas off. She told Goldman 
tnat oavid rexerred to his pajai-ias as lead pants and that thers wera els* 
phants around, aio also advised that this incident was a family joke and 
was well kr.o’.»n to Julius and Pthel Rosenbergf further that ttile incident 
had been related on .more than one oocaai<m when menbers of the family wore 
talking of actions of other njenbera, particularly when they were sick. 

^ 2 • 





Concerning the aboet, the poeelblUtjr exists that this etate*/ 
■ent night be used bj the Ros«nberg defense in an effort to diaoredit 
David Oreenglase as .a witness* . 

■;-f. - V ■ 'V , ' ’ ' ■ ■ ■.'■s''-', ’- /-’s’ 

For 7(nr fbrther infbrmation original handwritten statenent 
of David Greenglass aade in Jone^ 1950, for his attorney has been~exaiBlnod 
by our laboratory for latent fingerprints and no latent fingerprints of 
value wex*e devaltqwd* 



Tcu will be kept advised of ary additimal developsents in tMw 











SrANDARri‘*OI?M M9. ft* 




Office McfWfaflduP ^ • united states government 


TO 



. I 

-FROM : 
J 1BJBCT: 



IG '39*73 


> , 





DIRECTOR, FBI (65^^236) DATE; V30/53 

Ai«C{ Inspector Hennrich 
SAC, MEW YORK Atts FBI L^ratory 
(^153U8) 

JOXiXUS ROS&NH£RO^ 8^ ftX 

ESE^R 

ReNItel V30/53. 

There is forwarded herewith for the attention of tlAt FBI Laboratdty 
a two page statement on pad paper bearing the Roman numerals I / II and III and 
captioned at the top right hand side of page one as follows: "Saturday, June 
1950". 

The Laboratory Is advised that this statement, in pencil, is in the 
handwriting of DAVID GREENGLASS, self-admitted espionage agent* This statement 
was made by (RiESNGIASS while he was incarcerated at the Federal House of Detention, 
West Street, New York, after his arrest on June l6, 1950. This statement was 
prepared by him at the request of Mr. Herbert Fabricant, associate of Attorney 
O* John Rogge* This statement was delivered hy DAVID to his wife RUTH (HIEENGIASS 
who in turn delivered it by hand to Mr* Fabricant at his office at 1)01 Broadway, 
New York City* 

The Laboratory is further advised that on l)/l8/53 there appeared an 
article in the newspaper "Combat" which is published in Paris, France , which 
states in effect that the statement of GREENGLASS had been located. In the 
14 / 20/53 issue of the Paris newspaper "Humanlte" there appeared a reproduction, 
either photographic or photostatic, of this statement* Inquiry was made at 
the office of 0* John Rogge on U/29/53 for the whereabouts of this statement* 

The agents were advised by Mr* Rogge ^s office that the statement was not in 
the CKEENGLASS file* On l)/30/53 the agents visited the office of 0* John Rogge 
and spoke with Mr* Fabricant* He produced the GREENGLASS file and from it took 
out the enclosed statement* Mr* Fabricant stated he has no knowledge of how 
this statement was removed from the (ffiEENGLASS file for photographing purposes;^ 
and returned* ' — 1 








' The Laboratory is requested to process the enclosed statement for 

■. fingerpdnts* However, no process should be used which would either destroy 
’ ^ the writing or discolor the paper* If possible the Laboratory should also 
determine Khther there are any evidences on this paper that would indicate 
that it had been photographed or photostated* The Laboratory is further advised 
ihat Now York has not made either photographic or photostatic copies of this 
statement* 

\ ' ’ . . 

It is requested tqpon the conpletion of, Ijhis exafcinatiop, ,th® Laboratory 

piakft photographic reproductions of this statement anil! return the original and 
two copies thereof to this office, - / ? 

Enc^ (SPECIAL DELIVTOYj REGISTERED, A ^ 7 t ^ 

RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTEl^QQj^Q^Q C ^ ^ 



GOBtES^ 


L‘?CRM//?inK 4; 




* ' T 


L ^ i 


y, 1 








Letter to Director 
Attention >!r« Hennrich 



Tbe Laboratory is advised that at this tine it is believed that 
the following individuals have handled this statementt 

David Greenglass 
Ruth Greenglass 
Herbert Fabr leant 
0« John Rogge 

Mrs. Helen Pagano, Rogge *s secretary 

The Laboratory is advised that the evidence stickers on the 
enclosed statement have been initialed by SAs Richard A. Mlnihan and 
John A. Harrington of the New York Office who received this statement 
from Mr. Fabr leant. 


- 2 - 


1 




9 ?, 731 * 




B»eora«d 6-4<-6S fW 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF IHVESTI CATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 


7-2 


f 

} • 


Laboratory Work Sheet Recorded 5-6-53 lltOO AM ih 


LATENT 


UTENT. 


LAT^ 


199^ JULIU.3 BOSrSBERG, «B8« et al., 
E3P« • K. 


_ 66—5 8236 

File # 

Lab. # D-16597S fiS 




Exaunination requested by: 3AS» New Toric (6S-X5M8} 
Date of reference coouounicatlon:Let« 4/50/55 
Examination requested: Docwent* — 5,F.P»S« 

Result of Examination: 


Date received: 5 _i«S 3 


Examination by:iAshlgren 

Bowman 


Specimens sutoitted for examination 

Q ' A tTO page statement on Xlne-a pati papery in peccily be.^ing tii 4 hanu— i 

writing of DAVID GRi!«£NGL.^SSy beginning t "Tbeae are »y ap|.rojLiB>,ate st .te— I 
Bents...,.* anu exxiings ■....all what I saiu in x.he stat >B<int.« 

Retura evid. and 2 ec to New York. 




4 



oAC, ;;cy iorl: t65-l53i;o) 

Director, }\il (65-53236) 

■Ji-dua Tvo.j WAit, , 


i-s? y XVji 

lI':Gl3^rJ^ia:) SPirClAL DIILIV .HY 


RECc::-D.i 

"Etcto•^4ni -ipril 30 , I 9 . 3 , ^rf ;^;nittini; cn© two-pc c 

evXvnIiti*'ir J-^-Dorutor;' revert es :J9, for 




■"1 V 





uova troalca 


l. tonta of value e.evclopcci, .'ipeci-.ons, which 
v„.t/i Icdir.c fu..-.cs orily, retvu*aod hcrovlth* 


;.abo:-f.ter:y rev^ert cc-r'^ratc* 





way G IC 53 " _ 

MAfLED 26 11 ^ '1 

^ lEy I ‘ 



nt. 


6 3 JUN 2 

.• •? 0^ TPVIC' 

L n ‘■1^- :< 

f '/no* 


Sty 

<'F 

S'' 


y 


/ 


AA 


r t 


yr !•< I A. 


hiUBXbJ 1 




Mr. Tol9<>n. 
r. Lftdd 

1 T 


FEDJiRAI. BUREAU OF INV£STIGAT:t)N 
U. S. CtfAATi^an OF J'JSTIC£ 

(iC^MUNICATI&NS SECTiOH 







FBI NYC 
/DIRECTOR 


852 AM JLV 



1.:. 

Mr. 

id tv iiarVo.--a-; — 
Mr. Roseii— — 
Mr. tra^y. 

Mn Gearty. 

Mr. Mohr. 

Mr. Winterrowd. 

Tele. Room 

h^y^-Holloni aTi — 
Sizoo. 

Gandy. 


/A » 




5-5-53 
URGENT 

JULIUS ROSENBERG, IT AL, ESPIONAGE DASH R« THE QUOTE NEU' YORK 
TIMES UNQUOTE ISSUE MAY FOURTH ON PAGE FOUR CONTAINS A STATEMENT 
ABOUT THE RALLY HELD AT RANDALL-S ISLAND HAY THIRD. THIS ARTICLE 

REFERS TO THE MEMORANDUM WRITTEN BY’ DAVID GREENGLASS AND FEATURED 

1 

THIS MEMO AS QUOTE NEW EVIDENCE UNQUOTE, ARTICLE STATES 0. JOHN 
ROGGE CONFIRMED THAT THERE HAD BEEN A MEMO BY GREENGLASS SIMILAR 
TO THE DOCUMENT PRINTED IN THE FRENCH PRESS ON APRIL EIGHTEEN, 

V V 

IT QUOTES ROGGE AS STATING THAT THE ORIGINAL MEMORANDUM APPEARS 
TO HAVE BEEN QyOTE_llUXHED_ UNQUOT E FROM HIS FILES AND HAD BEEN 
^MISSING WH EN THE FBI FIRS T I NQUIRED ABOUT IT LAST WEDNESDAY, ONLY 
TO TURN UP IN THE FILES THE NEXT DAY, ROGGE FURTHER COMMENTED 
THAT GREENGLASS HAD FIRST QUOTE TOLD PART OF HIS STORY TO THE FBI 
UNQUOTE AND THEN LATER GAVE THE REST, HERBERT FABRICANT CALLED 
THE NYO AND SPOKE WITH SA JOHN A, HARRINGTON, FABRICANT STATED 

r 

THAT BLOCH HAD BEEN TO HIS OFFICE AND HAD A CONFERENCE WITH MR, 

^ , ft 

} 

■ROGGE AND HIMSELF, HE REQUESTED THAT AGENT HARRINGTON COME TO 
HIS OFFICE SO THAT HE COULD BE APPRISED OF THIS CONFERENCE, 




ISELF 


'i 


AGENT HARRINGTON AND SA RICH/^jg^j^^ir^HAN W^T^^ ^GGE-S OFFICE, 

ROGGE ADVISED THAT BLOCH CAME TO HIS OFFICE AND SPOKE WITH hIm! 
GGPIES-©E.ST«ayBD . WJ MAY 20 JS53 

yosz i/i ^ ^ 

« UST2 ( ./.fv -‘all information CCNTAINtUk 

I’ y v^^in?DT?TM TC TT*aV'T r 






. 1 


HEREIN IS UNCLA.::SIl'I£d^ . 
DATF. 



PAGE T¥0 

AND FABRICANT FROM ABOUT TEN FORTYFIVE AM TO TWELVE THIRTY PM. 

I ■ • ■ • 

FABRICANT MADE AVAILABLE A COPY OF HIS MEMO, MAY FOUR INSTANT. 

CONCERNING THIS CONVERSATION. Ca COPY OF THIS MEMO IS BEING FORWARDED 
' « 

TO BUREAU BY SEPARATE COVER. BLOCH HAD WITH HIM THE ABOVE ISSUE 
OF THE QUOTE NEW YORK TIMES UNQUOTE AND THE QUOTE DAILY WORKER 
unquote, and stated THAT HE WAS TRYING TO CHECK WHETHER THE HAND- 
WRITTEN STATEMENT AS REPORTED IN PARIS PAPERS WAS GENUINE. FABRiCANT 
j TOLD HIM AS FAR AS THEY KNOW THE HANDWRITTEN STATEMENT WAS 

GENUINE AND HAD BEEN FILCHED FROM THE FILES AND LATER RETURNED. 

\ 

BLOCH STATED THAT HIS FIRST KNOWLEDGE OF THE STATEMENT CAME TO 
HIM iN A CABLEGRAM FROM THE FRENCH ATTORNEY PAUL VILLARD. FABRICANT 
ADVISED THAT BLOCH SHOWED TO HIM A PHOTOSTATIC COPY OF A MEMO IN 
HIS FILE. THIS IS A MEMO WRITTEN BY R.H. GOLDMAN, A FORMER 
ASSOCIATE OF ROGGE. THIS IS A PHOTOSTATIC COPY OF THE MEMO IN 
vTHE 6REENGLASS FILE. BLOCH STATED THAT HE WAS OUTRAGED BY ACTIVITIES 
OF THE COMMITTEE, BUT BELIEVED THAT IF HE DID NOT USE HANDWRITTEN 
STATEMENT HE WOULD BE CASTIGATED BY COMMITTEE. BLOCH STATED THAT 
HE BELIEVED THAT HE BROUGHT OUT BY CROSS EXAMINATION MORE THAN 
APPEARED IN HANDWRITTEN STATEMENT. HE REFERRED TO A CONVERSATION 
HAD ON JUNE NINETEEN FIFTY, WHICH BLOCH, ROGGE, GORDON, GOLDMAN 
AND FABRICANT WERE PRESENT, AND DURING WHICH HELEN PAGANO WAS 
PRESENT TO TAKE NOTES. FABRICANT DISPUTED THIS AND ADVISED THAT 
END PAGE TWO 


. aiJE - THREE 


BLOCH WAS CONFUSING THIS WITH ANOTHER OCCASION. FABRICANT ADVISED 
.THAT HE TOLl^BLOCH THAT IT WAS HIS OPINION THAT THE ROSENBER6S 

I 

rWERE GUILTY AND SHOULD TALK TO SAVE THEMSELVES. BLOCH TOLD 
FABRICANT THAT HE HAD ASKED THE ROSENBERGS ON MORE THAN EIGHTT 
OCCASIONS TO ADMIT THEIR GUILT AND THROW THEMSELVES ON THE MERCY 
OF THE COURT IF THEY WERE GUILTY. HE STATED THAT THEY HAVE ALWAYS 
MAINTAINED THEIR INNOCENCE. BUREAU ATTENTION IS DIRECTED TO THE 
MEMO OF GOLDMAN, JUNE NINETEEN, NINETEEN FIFTY, A COPY OF WHICH 
IS BEING FORWARDED UNDER SEPARATE COVER. ON PAGE TWO, PARAGRAPH 
THREE, OfF THIS MEMO THERE APPEARS W THE FOLLOWING.. 

QUOTE AS TO HER HUSBAND SHE STATED THAT HE HAD A TENDENCY TO 
HYSTERIA. AT OTHER TIMES HE WOULD BECOME DELIRIOUS, AND ONCE 
WHEN HE HAD THE GRIPPE HE RAN NUDE THROUGH THE HALLWAY SHREAKING 
OF ELEPHANTS AND LEAD PANTS. PARAGRAPH FOUR STATES SHE HAD KNOWN 
HIM SINCE SHE WAS TEN YEARS OLD. SHE SAID THAT HE WOULD SAY 
THINGS WERE SO, EVEN IF THEY WERE NOT. HE TALKED OF SUICIDE AS 
IF HE WERE A CHARACTER IN THE MOVIES, BUT SHE DID NOT THINK 
HE WOULD DO IT. THEY HAD BEEN UNDER SURVEILLANCE BY FBI FOR SEVERAL 
WEEKS ET CETERA UNQUOTE PERIOD. FABRICANT ADVISED THAT HE WOULD 
BRING TO THE ATTENTION OF THIS OFFICE ANY OTHER CONTACTS HE HAD 
WITH BLOCH. THE BUREAU IS INFORMED THAT THE ABOVE NAMED AGENTS 

ACCEPTED THIS INFORMATION AND THE MEMOS FROM FABRICANT WITHOUT 
COMMENTS. 

BOARDMAN 


CORRECTION PAGE 3 LINE 10 WORD 2 IS "OF* AND DELETE WORD 7 "TO" 


HOLD PLS 


OOl lift. BEIJiONT - 
^ INTEL. DlVlfllOS 






mARD fRMM NO. 04 


Iffice NLemuTanduffi • united spates government 


lij : Dlreotor^ FBI 
Attention tinspeetor HENNRICH 


DATE: 5AV53 


F&OM : 


SAC> lork (65-^3U8) 


fe' ; 


SUiU^i JULIUS ROSEN^Q} ET AL 




r* t . «.*«».• 


ESPIDMOE - It 


1-2 i 


N; i 





*Mvf >j%A^ Thsre la forwarded herewith for Ime Information of the Bureau a copy 
of. ^a utter da'M 5/7/53> from QIAHnEL H/ BLOG^ addressed to Rogge ^ Fabr^ant^ 
ai^ Gordon^ 401 Broadway^ WfC^ together with copies of correspondence 

between PAUlL/vIIIAIS) ‘of Paris and 3iANUEL H* BLOCH* It is noted that this letter 
to B0QGS*s fins is answer to ^0GE*8 letter to BLOCH concerning the statements 
^ ROTH and DAVID /feaiGLASS, which werywfilched" from H0G0E»s file and 
photostated. // i I. u ■ 


Bae* 


%i* . A." . ^ 


PJXJISTERED - SPECIAL DELIVERI 


.C 




■ \ ^ v* 


^ 'i'i 


JAH:BDr 


r *• ** i 

k':, ‘ , 

.A- ^ y ' t 


" 1 » r/ 

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ff',RECOftr)ED-®S SO 




Jl ;fif . 


/* 


G2 May 2 7 1953 


! \’- 



/. i-y ) 

i .L '^ 


Kiy 7, 1953 

F«brlc«nt A Gordon, F-nqs, 

401 Brofldway 

Kew York City 13, Hew York 
^ . ATTPHTlOHi 0, John Bogge, Ksq. 

EoltOd iTtfltcn Y. Ros enberg. 

Dear iohnt 


Thla l8 In reference to your letter of V^y 6, 1951 in which you 
r.quen th.t I for«i.d to you -.ny orlgl^l/o? oi,l",r.‘hStS! 

• »''J« 0 '-«n<lun »hlch you st.'u ^0. 

In the handwriting of your client, Tavid Greengla««. an<" (^) m 

ty^d aeraoranduiB, dated June 19, 19 ^ 0 , initialed "n'o”, wiich 
you jtate to have been prepared by F.oi ort H. Goldman, ^orm^rly 

a BeBber of your flra, «w, 

It is apparent that your request it dec sion^d by the cr.nferenea 

--icont or y.>ur nr.. h^lS at y'S o??toc 
on yay 4, 1953# which I requested a«» a r^isult of a by 

you, reported In the of thet day, to t:M3 offact'tLt 

photost^lc copies of the above docunonts, t,.ei-8tof ore uMlthed 
In the French press, were authentic, 

t told you at that Conference that I hsd theretofore rocTlvgd a 
photostatic copy of each of tiie above docuiE^rnts . by ’’all frn'- 
«•. Paul YllUrd, Hvocot a U Cour, 66 Rue rpoatini/f^;,. ° 

'I •“ enclosing herewith a copy of r.y corre<»pon enre 

with this French lawyer,) 

T told you further that my purpose In s-ekln^ to cr.nf»pr vjth 
you was to ascertain. In accordance with ny obllg.’itlon- to ay 
Clients, Julius and *’thel Rosenberg, whether t .e afo^e<^'»l : -hoto- 
fitatic copies, which I displayed to you, wt-re authentic'. You 
edvlsed Bie that the originals of ther-? F‘'>curif*nt? ’varo in y'u’* 
files and that they h.cd neyor been rclon*-© 1 th-refro'! to your 
knowledge or with your consent a'vl approval. You relt-rnt- this 
odvlce In your letter of Vlay bth, end rt'jto, expro^^civ or Imnlletily 
that the orlg-nals of these photortatlc oci .sentr *er8 ■’etalfinlL__ 
from your .flies, • 


You how state that, since you have 


FlLfD^.. 


• r 


o Inform^id ~;e, 

* • - ^ . ■ . r vo.^’- 

^,,, however Innocent eta y be the ’.anner In v.hlch you ob^' 

tained photoat'jtle copies of these :cat rl«l* itlcn«’fl, 
we feel certain that, havln.? b'-en r.'ivl- d tfvit these ‘ 

materials were stolen from our file-;, you ^in ,ot hesi- 
tate to return to us any originals or co les, nhotostatic 


.Rogc«# Ftbrlc«nt A Oordon^ Ssqt* . ! Itoj 7, 1953 

4. * « 

or otherwist, of any such BaterlAls which mjt hare com 
fJro® our files. We therefore request that jou return 
to us any such originals or copies promptly and that you 
5f®fJ^oln from disclosing or using the contents thereof 
in any manner or fashion,” 

^y I state, first, that you oust reallre. of course, that these ' 
documents. Independently of myself, hare been published in ^e 
public press, and that, in fact, as appears from the newspapers' 
of May 4th, you yourself hare made public statements regarding 
them, uresumably with your clients* con'^ent, Kor can I assume 
that you mean in any manner to foreclose me from disclosing or 
using the contents of these photostatlo documents lo a proper 
legal manner or fashion in any proceeding duly authorised by law, 

' ■•’*#*•** -O 

I desire to avoid going Into a lengthy analysis as to whether I 
hove the right or duty to reteln these documents on behalf of my 
clients Julius Rosenberg and Rthel Rosenberg, However, as long as 
one lota of doubt nay exist as to the propriety of my retelning , 
these photostatic documents, I am not disposed to retain them, \ 
Indeed, the fact that the originals of the photostats In my posses-* 
slon may have been "stolen*' from your files (and I am relying upon , 
your representation to this effect) Is sufflelerit to move me' to 
re««pond affirrcstlvely, and without hesitation to your request,' ? f. 

T. therefore, enclose herewith a photostatic copy of the document, 
which I have designated above as (1), Consisting of three pages, 
and of the document which I have designated as (2), consisting 
of three pages, T have neither made nor retained copies of these 
documents, I have not now nor have I ever had In my possession 
any other "originals or copies, photostat^c or otherwise of any 
such iTia t'^rials which riay have come from ^[youjj/ files”, 

T re-^uest that you forthwith acknowledge receipt of this letter 
and the enclosed documents, 

However, since I am deeply concerned as to the .propriety of trans* 
mlttlng those documents to you, in terms of my duty to my clients 
and, therefore, your concomitant right to demand and receive 
them. In terras of the due administration of criminal Justice, I 
propose to direct a reque-t to the Couualttee on Professional Sthlcs 
of the Par Association, and to Chief Judge Knox, for a ruling as. 
to the rights and duties of each of us, r-s officers of the court, . 
with respect to the present and past use or suppression of the 
contents of those documents, insofar as they may seriously affect 





- 3 - 

Rogge, Pabrlcant ^ Oo»*(lon, Rsq** y'ay 7t 1953 

the v^ry lives of the Interested parties. 

■ > 

f^lncerely yonrs. 


: n’.k}nr-L h, blcch 

f!-TB/yf ■ . 

Boglstered !^all 

Return Receipt Hequeated ^ 

cc - Bar Association of the City of N’ee York 
42 »?ost 44th Ptreet . 

Bew York City, W.Y. 

Chief Judge John C, Knox ^ . 

United Ftates Courthouse 
Foley fquare ; 

, New York City, N.Y. - 

Udward J. Lumbarrt 
United ftntes Attorney for the 
Pouthorn PI strict of New York 
United Ptntes Courthouse 

Foley Fquare r 

New York City, H.Y. \ - 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Now York Office 
290. Broadway 
New York City, H.Y, 



FRFNCH CA5?LE COMPANY 


C 

0 

p 

Y 

DF 49 PAP. TP 97 1/50 18 1023 ^Aprll IS I 953 

PC FMA?r?P.L H BLOCH 401 PROArv/AY NF.WYORK 

. DAILY KPr.«? PA PFP. Cnj^M PUPLlPfFD THIF MORNING EXTRACT OF PMOTOPTATIC 
- DOCUJC^NT PAID TO OF DAVID GRF.FNOLArS UN KITING l-HICH iTOULb CONSTITUTE 
, KArTllAL PROOF OF ORKENOLAPF PERJURY STOP GRERNOLAfP FrilTEC QUOTE BUT TH 
■ I'LL TELL YOU I CAN HONTTTLY s^'AY T!fE INFORJ.’ATION I G.AVF GOLD 
* MAY NOT AT. ALL ^RAT I PAID IN THF PTATEMENT UNQUOTE AUTHENTICITY OF 


.D0CUM’'?J7 CAP .irE.LY B"' rFFCJ^D BY rTUTY OF UN KITING TTOP I F HALL ASK 
COVRAT.TO PFfH) YOU BY AIRW.IL COHPLETF. PFIOTOrTATIC DOCUMENTf 
-'B^rf'p-GARDf -V 


PAUL VILLARD AVOCAT A LA COUR 
66 RUE" RONTINI PARIR 




PAUL VILLARD 

Avooat a la Cour C 

0 

. P 

Y 

66, Rua Ppontinl 


April l%h 1953 


BY AIRmiL» rP^ClAL rTLTV-Tvl 


Bfflonuel H, BLOCH,, 
Counselor at Law, 

401 P.roa<’"ay Nk;'.-york. 


Dear Mr, Bloch, 

I am v?rittlng you this lattor In a hxiirry. I rent you 
this morning the following cables .. 

*• Bally newspaper ’’COMBAT’* published this morning extract of photo- 
stalle (’.ocument said to bo of Bavld GRV NOLArp hand.vrlting, which 
would constitute owterial proof of OR'KUOUrr. perjury, OR-PNOLArr 
writes t "But this 1*11 tell you I Can honestly say the Information 
I gave COLT) may be not at all what I said In the stateiceht. Authen- 
ticity of document can eosely be checked by study of handwriting 
I shall ask "COMBAT" to send you by Air Mail coQpl(=^te photos t a tic . 
documents. Best rogards, Paul VILLARD; Avocet a la Cour, . 66 rue 
fpontlnl, Paris,"- 

Please find enclosed the Newspaper this New 

spapera Is closed today, and T Intend to ask for the photostatic 
copies tomorrow Pundoy afternoon* 

I will keep you' Informed by cable. 


flncerely yours. 


V/ Paul Vlllard 
PAUL A. VILLAF.D 


4 





PAUL VILLARD 
AYOcat a la Cour 


66, Rue Rpontlnl 







C 

0 

P 

y 

April 20 th 1953. 






Ffflanuel R, BLOCH Raq» 
Coufifielor at Law« 

401 Broadway 

HFft-YORK 13 ■ K.-y. 


Dear Bloch, 


Following my cable, and my letter of April l8th, 
please find enclosed one set of the photostatic documonts, which 
were filvon to me for your intention by the Chief Kdltor of the 
Ne'srspaper "COVBAT’*. Could you be kind enough to advise jae by cable 
' of receipt of this letter, .. ' V. A: 

T ara sending another set for the Committee | t thank 
you In advance to keep me Inforrred of all developments, as the . 
French Trees Is anxious to have the conflrtration of the authentl- 
flcptlon of David G'r FN'GL' ''r handwrlttlng. 


Rincerely yours. 



s/ Paul Vlllard 
PAUL A, VILLARD, 







c 






A 





0 


April n, 1953 


TPLFGRA)/: TO I 

PAUL VI L LAPP 
66 Rue Fpontlnl 
Peris, France 


YOUR CARLF A'.T L*'TT R /'T-Rr^ '‘'D TO vr'. , L XI’f M .V! R:-" .V RK- 

CnV^'D OURING Hlf ' NCK /RO.M IF'. YCPK. Ja, ~LO'C;j h: TIBIT- • 
TO YORK CITY 0^^ THURSDAY M ’ .'ilCH TliP Y':OT. CO^' I.'NIC ‘TiqN 
V.I L B'- rO ’ PTATKLY TO HT^ A :Tv: vT Tr.?;, yoU FOR . 


TRIP IMFORWATION. 


OFFTCF (,P Fiftmy-L H. BLOCH 
















* «> 





c 


0 

p 

Y 

April 24, 1953 


S5e, Paul Vlllard 
66 Rue rpontlnl 
Pnr is, “Malice 

T>ear Vj. Villardx 

This la to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of April ' ' 

1953 well as certain photostatic documents, the 
original of which appeared to be In the posaosslon of the'’ 
newsnaper "Combat'’# This belated ecknowledgoent Is occasioned 
by my absence from the City for the past few days# 

r cannot attest or vouch for the authenticity of the docu- 
raents which you sent me# T have not In my possesnlonnor 
have I r,ver had any samples of the hand.*rltlng of DavW 
Oreenglass from which a comparison coulo be made by a 
hand-.’nritlog expert or anyone else to draw the conclusion ‘ 
that the letter In the possession of Combat does In fact 
reflect the handwriting of Greenglasr# . . " 

c’- * 

Please accept my warmest frat'^rnal greetings# 


SMANURL H# BLOCH 


BUB/yf 


Office TS/isnu^andutn • dnited states government 


TO 


D. 


Ladd 





DATE: liay 15, 1953 


WIOM » A. H. Belmon 


8UBJBCT: JULIUS R0SE1©ERG, ET AL 
ESPIONAGE - R 


ToIsoq 

Udd^ 




/ 


Niebols . 
Belnoac 

CI*M- 

GUvtiu- 
Htfto — 
Rotcfl — 
Trrncy^ 

Mohr 


Viaicmvd^ 
T«te. Ropa. 
Hollomaa 

Miu Gaadr. 


You were previously advised that a copy of a handwritten statement of 
David Creenglass made in Jane, 1950, for his attorney, 0» John Rogge, appeared 
in French newspapers during April, 1953, and that Rogge's opirdon was statement 
had been stolen from his files for photographing and later returned. On 5-4-53, 
Einanuel Bloch, Rosantergs* attorney, conferred with Rogge and disclaimed any 
knowledge of the theft stating his first knoml^dge of statement came to him in 
a cablegram from Paul Villard, French attorney, Bloch had in his possession Photostat 
of memoraridum dated 6-19-50, written by R, H. Goldman, former law associate of Rogge, 
for Rogge's files, which reported interview with Ruth Greenglass three days after her 
husband was arrested, Rogge transmitted letter of 5-6-53, to Blocn requesting Bloch 
to return any niaterial they might have from Rcgge's files and refrain from disclosing 
or using the contents in any manner. Rogge had made copies of letter , available to ' 
Bar Association of the City of New York, Federal Judge iiiox, U5A, SDNY, and our ItYO. 

Our NTC has received copy of letter from Eloch dated 5-7-53, addressed to 
u.oggo in v.-hich Bloch returns Photostats of Goldman inomorandum and David Greenglass' 
sta.toc.ent. In his letter, Bloch states he proposes to direct req.;est to Coumittee 
on Professional Ethics of Ear Association and Judge Knox for ruling as to rirhts 
and duties of Itogge and himself, "with respect to the present and past use cr sup>- 
pression of the contents of these docu.T.ents, insofar as they may seriously affect 
the very lives of the interested p,arties," Bloch also attached Photostats cf 
correspondence /rltk Paul vi.llard to sho'"' he received Goldman's document from Villard, 

Department pr-eviously advised of Bloch's conference with Rogge and contents 
of Rogge's letter to Bloch by memoranda cf 5-8-53, and 5-11-53. 

RBCCfyBNDATICN ; 

A ; 

Attached for approval is a memcrandum to Hr, Olney of the Department / i •' 
reporting contents of Bloch's letter of 5-7-53, < ; 


?..LL 


V . 

J,,-. - - 


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7 • Ay. » 


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to. 


ss 


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A tta element 
05-^823'e : 
APL;cdri 


cc - 


Belmont 


Assis tant Attorney General 1953 

Warren Olney IJI 



i?fGORO£D . 5$ 


Director, FBI 


(p 5 ^ 3 / (s S ! 


JULIUS KOSEVBERO, ST AL 
ESPTOWAGB • R 



Re/erenee fs made to our aenorandua of May 11, 19S3, 
advising of the contents of a letter dated Ifay 6, 1953, froa 
0, John Rogge, attorney for David and Ruth Greenglass, to Smxinuel 
Bloch, attorney for the Bosenbergs* , 


Our Fev; Tori Office has received from Fr, Bloch a copy 
of a letter dated May 7, 1953, irhich he haa forwarded to Mr, Rogge 
This letter reads as follows: 

Dear John: 


This is in reference to your letter of May 6, 1953 in which 
you request that I forward to you **any originals or copies, 
photo static or otherv-ise" of: (l) a aemorandua which you 
state to be in the handi riiing of your client, David 
Greenglass, and (2) a typed memorandum dated June 19, 1950, 
initialed ”RliG” , which you state to have been prepared by 
Robert H, Goldman, formerly a member of your firm. 


It is apparent that your request is occasioned by the can- 
ference between us and Herbert Fabricant of your firm, held 
at your office on May 4, 1953, which I requested as a result 
of a statement by you, reported in the M,T, Times of that day 
to the effect that photostatic copies of the above documents , 
theretofore published in the French press, were authentic. 


Tolsvo — 

Ladd 

Nicbola 


Beltnotti 

ae„ 

GlaTia 

Harbo 

Rocea 

Tracy 

Ctany 

Mohr 

^interrowd 
Tele. Ro-*m 
Holloman 
SililO 
.Hiss 


I told you at that conference that I had tJ eretofore received 
a photosiatic copy of each of the above dociimcphtw:^ by mail, 
from He, Paul Villard, Avocct a la Cour, €(.'■ Rue R^ntini, 
Paris, France, (I cm enclosing hereuith c copyG-of^y corres^ 
pondence with this French lawyer,) po 

I told you further jtha^'dn^ purpose in seehingto confer, 
with you was to asS^riain, in.,(^ecordance with my 6^1 iga^ 
tions to my clientSj Julius ‘ahd Ethel'. Rosenberg,, whether 
the aforesaid photoi^atic copies, which I displS^ea to 
you, were authentic, Tou ad vi Med We that the originals 


- F&i 


— --- t . 

loman /i ( ;• 

2 ? 




‘/AILED 


•Di 


Av'. r j 1 

»;TL --TOPS' rrgs^ CCr'Ti'l-Tl^ 

" • . S \ \ 

4 *- • \ ^ ^ i 

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u 




I' 


AFL: odd 


S' 


^ docunenta wera in your /i leg and that thav had ^ ^ 
nauar bean ralaaaed thera/rou to your knowledga or with 
your oonaant and approval. Tou rUteraU thiV advtVa in 

dtata, axpraaaly or inpHa^iy 
that tha originala of theoe photoaiatio doeunenta uiera ^ 
atoian froa your ftlea. “ 


Tou now atcte that, atnce you hava ao informed ne^ 

"...howauar innocent may ba tha uannar in which 
you obtained photoatatic eopiea of theaa nateriala 
mentioned, ice feel certain that, having bean 
adviaed that theaa matariala wera atolen from our 
/tU3, „,u ..<12 not hcttot, to rot„ro to Z \Z 
originala or C'ypiea, photoatatic or othertriaa. of 
any each matariala which may hava come from our 
filea. »e therefore raqueat that you return to 
ua any auoh originala or copies promptly and that 
yo?i refrain from, diacloainn nr uatno the contanta 
thereof in anv mannrr or fashion," 


**‘^’^ * first, that non must realise, of course, that 

been pub- 

pufclfc press, and that, in fact, as appeara 

i^ourael/ have mad* 
re^ardinp them, presumably with your 
canaent, fjor can I asauna that you mean in any 
foreclose me from disclosing or using the con- 
^nt» of these photoatatic documenta in a proper laoal 
^nner or fashion in any proceeding duly authorised^ by 

ItXWn 


poing into a lengthy analyst a ce to 

on llVii t.*!® rfs-Tif or duty to retain these doounentt 

on behalf of my clier^te Julius i:osenberg and Ethel 

^l^on^'Org, ffofiever, as lone as one iota of doubt nay 
exi^t as to the propriety of my retaining these photo- 

disposed to retain then. 

Indeed, »he fact that the originals of the photostats 
/ may have teen "atolen" from your files ^ 

{ana I an relying upon your repreeentetion to this effect) 

respond affirmatively, and 
without hesitation to your reouest, 

I, therefore , enclose herewith a photos tc ti c copy of 
docuvientj which I have aes ignazi'd aLove Cl) a 

onnsistina oj three pageSp and of the docuraent which I 
nave ciesi pnateti as (^), consisting of three pages, I 
nave neither made nor retained corier Oj thes edocur.ents , 


I' : 

Cr 


J have not noir nor have I ever had in mj/ poeseeeion 
any other **ortginale or copies, photostatic or other- 
wise ^ any suoh Mterials which may have come from 
/ile9% .. 

I request that you forthwith acknowledge receipt of 
this letter and the enclosed docurnentSm 

However, since I ok deeply concerned as to ths pro- 
priety of tranenitting these documents to you, in terms of 
my duty to my clients and, therefore, your concomitant 
right to demand and receive them, in terns of the due 
administration of criminal Justice, I propose to direct 
a request to the Committee on Profeesional Ethics of the 
Bar Association, and to Chief Judge Knox, for a ruling as 
to the rights and duties of each of us, as officers of the 
court, with respect to the present and past use or sup- 
pression of the contents of these documents', insofar as 
they nay seriously affect the very lives of ths interested 
parties. 


Sincerely yours. 


EiiANUEL L, BLOCH 

EliB/yf 

Registered Hail 

Return Receipt Requested 

1 , 

oc - Bar Association of the City of New fork 
42 ^est 44th Street 
New Kor k City, 

Chief Judge John (7, Knox 
United States Courthouse 
Foley Square 
New Tork City, N,T, 

Edward J, Lumbard 
United States Attorney for the 
Southern Bistriot of New Tork 
United States Courthouse 
Foley Square 
New Tork City, N.T, 

Federal Bureau of Inveatigati on 

New Tork Office 

290 Broadway 

New Tork Cityt N,Y, 


65-58236 


- 3 - 




INDEX^ 


KKKAI bureau of IWESTIGATION 
It S. D£f AKTKfiHt Of JUSTICE 

COMMUWCAnGNS SECTION 

MAYUJSsf 




Llcgr 

[^r. Glavin. 
Mr. Harbo. 
Mr. r.oscn_ 
Mr. Tracy_ 
Mr, Ge.'LTty, 
Mr. Mohr_ 



WASff 22 
I RECTOR 


FROM NEW YORK 


12 


10-3g PM 


Mr. Winterrcwd- 
Tele. Room 

Mr. Hclloman 

Mr. Sizoo 

Miss Gandy 


ALL INFC®?Mfir CONTAINED.. 

HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFIED , ■ v 
mTK ' BY ioi^a 

ADVISED TODANQ^ 

THAT EMANUEL BLOCK VISITED JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG ON THE EIGHT LAST. 


.0. 


JULIUS ROSENBERG, ESP - R. 




DURING THIS VISIT, THE JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT WERE REFERRED TO 


AS •SENILE OLD LUNCHERS, SOUTHERN BOURBONS AND SMALL TIME PHONIES. •/ 

Jj>f' 

BLOCH HAS VERY AGITATED AND STATED THAT DAVID ANB^EHIUvAUMAN. WERE TAKItll? 


OVER THE ROSENBERG COMMITTEE AND MEDDLING IN LEGAL MATTERS. HE REQUESTED 
JULIUS TO GET WORD TO THEM TO STOP MEDDLING IN LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE 
CASE. BLOCH TOLD JULIUS AND ETHEL ABOUT THE LETTER FROM 0. JOHN ROGGE 
AND STATED HE FEARED THAT A TRAP IS BEING SET TO GET HIM. HE TOLD 
JULIUS AND ETHEL THAT MR. ABRAMS OF THE EMERSON 
RADIO CORP^HAD REFUSED TO SUBMIT AN AFFIDAVIT THAT A PROXIMITY 
FUSE HAD BEEN STOLEN DURING FORTYFIVE DASH FORTYSIX. ABRAMS STATED 

K 

% 

THAT THESE RECORDS HAD BEEN DESTROYED. BLOCH ALSO STATED 

THAT BEN TELLER, A FORMER WORKER WITH JULIUS AT EMERSON RADIO^ HAD 

REFUSED TO SUBMIT ANY AFFIDAVIT TO HELP JULIUS. THERE WAS GENERAL / / 


CONVERSATION AND HIGH PRAISE FOR LIONEL STANDER AND OTHER WITNESSES 
WHO REFUSED TO ANSWER QUESTIONS BEFORE THE VLEDE COMMITTEE. THERE 







r 



'Sr 


^ UAr 20 195}'^ 



end of PAGE ONE 


•N ¥ 





♦ 


f 





PAGE TVO 



WAS FURTHER CONVERSATION OF THE NECESSITY TO GET BERNARD GREENGLASS 
TO SUBMIT AN AFFIDAVIT ABOUT THE THEFT OF THE TOOLS AND URANUIM. 
ADVISED THAT TODAY JULIUS AND ETHEL HAVE THEIR WEEKLY VISIT. THERE 
WAS FURTHER CONVERSATION THAT BERNARD GREENGLASS HAS NOT YET 
GIVEN THEM THE REQUESTED AFFIDAVIT AND HE IS REPORTED TO HAVE STATED 
THAT HE WOULD DO NOTHING THAT WOULD HURT DAVID GREENGLASS-S FIRST 


CHANCE OF PAROLE. 



ADVISED THAT JULIUS ROSENBERG WROTE A LETTER 





TO BLOCH IN WHICH HE OUTLINES THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE ACTIVITIES 
OF THE ROSENBERG COMMITTEE AND THE LEGAL PROBLEMS OF BLOCH. HE 
SUGGESTS TO BLOCH THAT THIS LETTER BE SHOWN TO DAVID ROSENBERG AND 
ETHEL GOLDBERG SO THAT THEY COULD CONTACT THE COMMITTEE AND 
TELL THEM NOT TO INTERFERE WITH THE LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE CASE. 

ALSO ADVISED THAT JULIUS ROSENBERG WROTE A LETTER TO HIS EMINENCE 
CARDINAL SPELLMAN IN WHICH HE ASSERTS THE INNOCENCE OF HIMSELF AND HIS 
WIFE AND REQUESTS THE CARDINAL TO PERSONALLY AND PUBLICLY INTERCED El 
WITH PRES I DENT EISENHOWER TO GRANT THEM CLEMENCY .-m^D VISED THAT 
SINCE THE CARDINAL IS NOT ON THE APPROVED CORRESPONDENCE LIST OF THE 
ROSENBERGS, THIS LETTER WILL NOT BE FORWARDED TO THE CARDINAL. 



END PAGE TWO 




Y . 




PAGE THREE 


Dct> 


ADVISED THAT WHEN JULIUS QUESTIONS HIM CONCERNING THIS LETTER, HE WILL 
TELL JULIUS TO HAVE BLOCH CONTACT THE CARDINAL. REMYTEL MAY SEVEN, 
riFTYTHREE. PHOTO OF INDIVIDUAL WHO CONTACTED BER SCHNEIDER WAS SENT TO 
mHUmp AND HE ADVISED TODAY THAT THIS PHOTO WAS NOT A PICTURE 
OF DR. SAUL MILLER. RENYTFL MAY ONE, FIFTYTHREE IN WHICH REFERENCE IS 
MADE TO DR. BERNHARDT AND IN WHICH NY ADVISED THAT IT WOULD NOT 
INTERVIEW BERNHARDT. IN VIEW OF THE DEVELOPMENTS IN THIS CASE AND THE 
FACT THAT SCHNEIDER HAS BEEN INTERVIEWED, IT IS BELIEVED NOW THAT 
^BERNHARDT COULD BE INTERVIEWED WITHOUT ENDANGERING SOURCE OF INFO. 

IT IS REQUESTED THAT THE BUREAU IMMEDIATELY ADVISE NY WHETHER IT DESIRES 
THAT DR. BERNHARDT BE INTERVIEWEDM 


BOARDMAN 





HLD 




cc - Mr, Belmont 


Aeeistant Attorney General 
Barren Olriey III 

Director^ FBI ^ 

RECORDED - 5^- 2y^ 3 W 

^VtlVS BOBlVhEUO, et Cl 9 
ESriOMAOE - Jl 


May 14, 1963 


- /^ S 9- 


noy 


£3 ^■;•: g 
OV 1 

LO 

JZ-^; ! 

► — • 

t-io i 
t-i •iC. v’ 

St; ^ 

5S tr. '.J 


Tolsoa 

Lftdd 

Nidiols 

Belinoat 

Clew 

Gtavin — ^ . . 

Htrbo 

Roscfi 

Tr«cy 

Geirty 

yohr 

^iiifcrrowd — 
Tele. Roo*n 

Mollomaft 

Si Zoo 

i V 


adutsed Vtat tfl8 hOSBnUBfgu lUere violted by 
Emanuel Bloch, on May 6, 1963m During thio visit the Judgta 
of the United States Supreme Court nere referred to as l^sehile 
old lunchers. Southern Bourbons, and small time phoniesm" 

Bloch was very agitated and stated that David Alnan (Executive 
Secretary of the Motional Committee to Secure Justice in the 
Rosenberg Case) and his wife, Emily, were taking over the 
liosenberg Committee end meddling in legal matters, lie 
requested Julius to get word to them to stop interfering in 
the legal aspects of the cascm Bloch tcld the Rosenberga 
about a letter he had received from Cm John F.cgce, and stated 
he feared that c trap wca being set to get him, Me also told 
the Kosenbergs that o Mr, Abrans of the imevsen Radio Corpora^ 
tion hed refused to snb~.it cn efficlavit that « proximity fuse 
had not been stolen during lC-i3’‘194C, claiming tftai the records 


aeen nestreye.- 


1 c ah furt h f r re zMrkcc tha 


Z 


X a i 


ler. 


former icorher with Julius at Dnercon, had refused tc sucrit any 
affidcoitjto help Julius, Ihic apparently refers U- cn effort 
on the pari of Dloch to refute the testir.cny of Lauid Creenglcss 
ct the trial that Rosenberg told Greenglaos he, Rosenberg, 
while esiployed at Emerson, stole a proximity fuse wh.ich he 
Icter turned ever to the Fueaiensm o 

also adviced that there txis gene^l 
conversa tion cad high praise for Lionel i? tender, r^ovie ^ctor, 
and ether witnesses who refused to answer questions he fere the 
Velde Co'-wTcittee, Bloch end the icsenbcrgs also discussed the 
necessity of getting Bernard Creenglcss to submit cn affidavit 
thai’^he had knowledge of the theft by Icvid Greenglass of tools 
endCuran ium while the latter was in the Amym ^ ^ i-. 

J||^HH|||||H|||||| o2so advised that on Bay IS, lb53, 

Julius an^ltne^tS^the i r weekly vieit. There was converse'^ . 
tion to the effect that Bernard Greenglass had not yet given \ 
them the requested affidavit because he did not want to do 
anything that would hurt David Greenglaas*a first chance of I 

. . L 


parole. 


APL:awui 


juNi-as: 




>?. cd 


/ 




1 b I£.63 




- - ^ r;-\\ 

\ ' 


;L 

• • \ 

t/ 


Si-'Ct. . 



f 




V-.. 




, ^rthsr odyt9€d that ^uliuM 

B0B9nb9rg had mrttUo • latUr to Bloeh in ^ich hd 
ouUiuod iho di/foroneo botwoon tftt aotioitioo of 
Rooonbtrg CoonttUo and tho logal probloma of Bloohm 
Bo ouggesied to Bloeh that this letter be ehonn to h to 
brother, Baoid Soeenberg, and hU eUter, Ethel aoldberg, 

00 that they wuld con^ct the Constttee oad tell then not 
to interfere with the legal aopecto of the ease* 

oloo related that Rooenberg had iia> 
wrttUn oletterteBio Eainenee, Cardinal Spellman, in 
which he aeeerted the innocence of hiwieelf and hie wife 
and requested the Cardinal to personally and publicly 
Anterced^with President Eisenhower to grant then cleneney* 
HIHHHiB oince the CaMitml U not on the 

approuea correspondence list ef the Rosenbergs, thie letter 
will not be fonocrded to Cardinal Spellnan^ He will infora 
JuHue of this and suggest that Julius haoe Blech contact 
the Cardinals 


Ton litJl be kept advised of any additional 
develOTiKents in tuis matter » 






URGENT 


/ 


\ 



/ 


MAT 14s 
SACs SEi TORE 


o. 


JOLIOS aOSSEBSRGs ST Alg SSP20SAGS HASB B. BSURTEL HAT TVSLfS 

tASTs BSQUSSTISO AOmORIIT TO JETEBriET PB* OSOSGS BSBBBABPT* 

• * , . • • ^ . 

DISCUSS 92m USA, EDVr, AMD 29 BE PES2RSS SUCH 29fES72S9 AS OF 
P0SS2BLE ASS2STAffCE TO B2M 2M HANDlEHa FUTURE lEQAL ASPECTS OF 
m2S CASE, BUREAU BAS BO CBJECT20B TO INTERVIEW, 2N V2£W OF 
IBTSNS2F2EP EFFORTS OF DEFENSE TO SECURE NEB TRUE ON fAR20US 
OROUNDS, ALL LEADS SHOULD BE COVERED SXPED2T20USLT* ALSO, A 
REPORT SU 2 TABLE FOR D2SSIM2NATI0N REFLECTING ALL RECENT - 
DSVELOFJENTS SHOULD BE SUBB2TTED AS SOON AS P0SS2BLS* 



fNJ 


HOOVER 


66^56236 
APLsav>N.yy 


recorded ' 72 





MAY 20 tiSS 




Tolsoa 

tadd- 


NOTE: Greenglaaa aduiaed that at tine Rosenberg was tnstrudting htu 
to leave U939j Rosenberg told hin Dr, Bernhardt would give a Fal se 
certificate of vaccination for the Greenglasses for their proposed 
trip to Mexico, On 6-7»S0 Agents contacted Bernhardt who adm^ted 
being Rosenberg fanily physician^ but denied being approached -for 
certificate. Three days later Bernhardt contacted BIO and changed 
his story f stating he recalled receiving telephone call, f rot <-h 
Rosenberg two or three months before inquiring about type oJF 
injections needed by a friend who was going to Mexico, However^ 
Rosenberg never asked for certificate, Bernhardt testified to the 
above as Government witness at trial. Information has been received 
recently that defense is attempting to secure affidavit from Bernharx 
admitting that he perjured himself at the trial with the view of 
using affidavit in effort to secure new trial. It is believed 
desirable that interview of Bernhardt at this time to determine if 
^ has been approached by the defense be cleared with USA, SDNT, in 


of its possible bearing on future legal proceedings in this 


Ijn^CPMATIO?! 


Nichols 
Beimoat 

ct»,, — caqq, 

Gtavin 
Harbo 
Bosco 

Tt.cy i')f)TE 

Ge-rnf , 

Mohr 

^incerro«d — 

Tele. Roo'n ^ ^ 
llolloinaQ 

oiZOO 

Miss G.indy _ 


ft 


/ 




-.COPiES destroyed 

fo. 







USE ATTORNET GENERAL 




Director, FBI 

o 

JULIUS ROSSmSRG, tfi al 
ESPIONAGE • M 


May 25, 1953 

I 


Tfc# Special Agent In Charge af ay Mem lark Office thie 
afternoon conferred loith Federal Judge Irving Kaufman with ‘ ' 
reference to developnente, in view of the deciaton handed dovn 
by the Supreme Court today in thie caeom Judge Kaufman etated 
that no date or plan hae been formulated ae yet; that the normal 
procedure would be that the Supreme Court would return I to ^dgment 
to the Circuit Court of Appeale and, in the abeenee of a etay, thie 
would be referred by the Circuit Court, direct to Judge Kaufman and 
could reach him. by the end of thie week; that, however, the 
Soaenberge* attorney, Emanuel Block, can make a motion for a stay, 
and if each a etay ie granted the verdict of the Supreme Court 
will remain in the Supreme Court for that flfteen^day period; 
further, that ehould the Supreme Court have receaaed for the 
summer by that time no action would be taken until next October, 

Kith regard to the poaaibility of Attorney Bloek*e requesting 
a stay in the Supreme Court, you may desire to make some arrancement 
in order that the Department will be immediately advised of the 
filing of any such papers, so that the Department may tmmediatelu 
file any answer necessary. 


Federal Judge Kauf^n advised on December 23, 1952, 

when the Rosenberga* family called on him in hie chambers, the 
family made a very hysterical plea for tfcW Rosenberga, On this 
occasion Judge Kaufman advises that he as^ed the family if they 
had suggested to the Rosenborgs that theyl help themselves. He 
stated the family’s reaction to this eommient was one of indignation. 


Toltfsn 


Ntch)^ 
Ko»on\ 
■Yacy 


> hooa 


Judge Kaufman further stated that] on December 30, 1952, in 
connection with the application for arref^etton of sentence by the 
i.os enberge , he indicated that the Rosenborgs could help themselves, 
out that they had taken no steps to do so, ^ 

Judge Kaufman furt^r,,a^H e<!tlt3li^ t on January 2, 1953, 
in his opinion he diacuaa^^f cortii<Ferable length the fact that 
the Rosenborgs had shown no fo^orpe u^tspsver. The Judge stated 
jthat on no occasion did he =s 'id is what otAs he would take in the 
yvent they made any effort to aseiat thsAslues by furnishing ' 
Information concerning thetdf^idmplicX'ty- Ns -the appropriate 
government offictals,.^,.^ ,/ ^ 7/ t t t^A 

, " &'^0,')0ED-45 J I b5(\ 



) iVl 


./ ... ■ ,&.':0,')DED.45 

V. di jd^ek n 




note, page 

TO T ' Ov *; 

D Al'n: by Jjpis 




NOTE! (5/25/53) 

In accordance with the Director 's instructions, I telephonically 
contacted SAC Boardman on the afternoon of 5/25 and instructed him to 
contact Judge Kaufman, find. out. what is the approximate date which he 
might set for the execution, and point out that the sooner action . 
was taken the better; also to determine under, what circumstanjces 
and how many times the Judge had indicated to the Bosehbergs that 
if they talked they might receive some consideration 0 

The information in this memorandum to the Attorney General 
is based on a return call from Jifr. Boardman reflecting the results 
of his interview with Judge Irving Kaufrnanm 


D 0 K 0 LADD 



t 


# 

* « 

> 4 

page two 

OF STUFF FROM HIS HOUSE BUT IT MAY BE THAT THE TABLE IS IN ETHEL 
GOLDBERG-S PLACE, ON FEBRUARY FOURTEEN JULIUS AND ETHEL . 

AND THE CHILDREN AND BLOCH HAD A VISIT, THE REPORT READS "ACCORDING 
TC BLOCH TABLE WAS TRACED TO MACY-S BY A DISTANT RELATIVE OF ” 

8LOCH-S WIFE, THIS PERSON A KALE, IS IN CHARGE OF THE FURNITURE 
DEPT, OF MACY-S, BLOCH SAID TABLE WAS MADE BY BRANDT CR BRAND 
MANUFACTURING CO, AND ARE IDENTIFIED BY CODE NUMBERS INDICATING 
COMPANIES TO WHOM SOLD, ON THE MARGIN OF THIS REPORT IS WRITTEN 
"NINETEEN DOLLARS, NINETY FIVE CENTS AND TAX"", THE REPORT 
CONTINUES "JULIUS EAGERLY DESCRIBED IN ANSWER TO A QUESTION 
FROM BLOCH "HAD HE EVER ALTERED THE TABLE«Z "YES I GOT A METAL 
DRILL FROM THE SHOP AND SOME METAL SCREWS AND FIXED IT SO THAT 
IT WOULD BE SERVICEABLE," BLOCH ASKED IF THERE WERE GROOVES OR 
ANYTHING LIKE THAT ON THE TABLE, JULIUS SAID YES, IT APPEARS 
THE TABLE IS MORE THAN LIKELY AT ETHEL GOLDBERG-S PLACE OR DAVID 
ROSENBERGS," THAT IS THE ONLY REFERENCE IN THIS REPORT TO THE 
TABLE, THE REPORT CONTINUES THAT JUDGE JEROME FRANK- PROMISED BLOCH 
OVER THE PHONE THE OTHER DAY THAT HE WOULD GET A STAY WHEN HE ASKED 
FOR IT ON TUESDAY, ON FEBRUARY FOUR, JULIUS AND ETHEL 
AND BLOCH HAD A VISIT IN WHICH IT WAS MENTIONED THAT DR, MILLER 
IS TRYING TO CONTACT A WITNESS, SNIDERMAN OR LIKE THAT AND GET 
HIM TO ADMIT HIS TESTIMONY WAS PERJURED DUE TO THE THREATS OF THE 
FBI AND subtle COACHING FROM SAME GROUP, THE REFERENCE TO 



END PAGE TWO 


PAGE THREE 




DR. MILLER REFERS TO DR. SAUL MILLER WHO VISITS ETHEL. THE 

I 

REFERENCE TO SNIDERMAN REFERS TO BEN SCHNEIDER, THE PASSPORT 

photographer WHO WAS A WITNESS* THE BUREAUS ATTENTION IS DIRECTED 

« 

TO PAGE TWO ONE THREE ONE OF THE ORIGINAL STENOGRAPHERS MINUTES 
OF THIS TRIAL. THE PRINTED RECORD IS NOT AVAILABLE TO NY AT THIS 
TIME BUT THE BUREAU WILL BE ADVISED SUBSEGUENTLYAS TO WHERE THE 
FOLLOWING WILL BE FOUND IN THE PRINTED RECORD. IT REFERS TO THE 
CROSS EXAMINATION OFfSCHNEIDER BY BLOCH AND THE FOLLOWING 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ARE NOTED, Q. WHERE ARE THE NEGATIVES. A. WE 
DONT KEEP THE NEGATIVES. Q, YOU DONT KEEP ANY NEGATIVES IN 
YOUR PLACE. A. NO. Q, NOT ONE. A. WE DONT NO. Q. NOT FOR 
A DAY. A. FOR A DAY BUT AFTER THAT QM FOR TWO DAYS. THE COURT 
JUST A MOMENT, DONT YOU WANT HIM TO ANSWER* MR. BLOCH, YES I 
THOUGHT HE DID. THE COURT ALL RIGHT, JUST TAKE IT EASY PLEASE. 

Q. FOR TWO DAYS. A. NO. WE DONT. Q. NEVER. A. NO, BEN SCH- 
NEIDER WAS INTERVIEWED TODAY BY SAS RICHARD A. MINIHAN AND JOHN 
A, HARRINGTON, SCHNEIDER ADVISED THAt/wO PEOPLE HAVE COME ' 

TO HIS STORE SINCE THE AGENTS LAST VISIT TO HIM IN THE LATTER 
PART OF FEBRUARY, NINETEEN FIFTYTHREE, HE STATED THAT ONE MAN 
CAME IN AND ASKED HIM IF HE WAS SCHNEIDER AND WANTED TO TALK 
ABOUT THE CASE, SCHNEIDER REFUSED TO TALK WITH HIM, HE STATED 
THAT ON X TUESDAY OF THIS WEEK A MAN CAME TO HIS SHOP AND ASKED 
TO HAVE PASSPORT PICTURES TAKEN, SCHNEIDER 


END PAGE THREE 



TOOK THREE PICTURES FOR THE SUM OF ONE DOLLAR, WHEN MAN WAS 
LEAVING THE STORE HE ASKED SCHNEIDER IF HE WAS SCHNEIDER, HE 
replied yes AND THIS MAN ASKED IF HE HAD TAKEN THE PASSPORT 
PICTURES IN THE ROSENBERG CASE, WHEN HE REPLIED THAT HE HAD 
THE MAN ASKED SCHNEIDER DID HE HAVE THE NEGATIVES AND 
SCHNEIDER SAID NO, THE MAN THEN LEFT AFTER EXPLAINING TO 
SCHNEIDER THAT HE WAS A STUDENT IN LAW SCHOOL AND HAD BEEN 
FOLLOWING THE CASE. THE AGENTS DISCUSSED THIS MATTER WITH 
SCHNEIDER AND ASKED HIM IF HE HAD THE NEGATIVES OF THIS MAN-S 
PICTURE, THE BUREAU-S ATTENTION IS DIRECTED PARTICULARLY TO 
THE FOLLOWING- SCHNEIDER WENT TO A WASTEPAPER BASKET AND PICKED 
OUT A BATCH OF NEGATIVES AND STATED THIS WAS TODAY-S AND. 
YESTERDAY-S NEGATIVES, HE LOOKED THROUGH THEM AND DIE NOT FIND 
A NEGATIVE OF THIS MAN-S PICTURE, HE THEN WENT TO A WASTERBASKET 
IN THE BACK ROOM AND CAME OUT WITH ANOTHER BATCH OF NEGATIVES, 

HE STATED THIS BATCH WAS THE NEGATIVES OF THE FIFTH AND FOURTH 
OF MAY, GOING THROUGH THESE NEGATIVES HE LOCATED THAT OF THE 
MAN IN QUESTION, HE DELIVERED THIS NEGATIVE TO THE AGENTS AND 
COPIES OF THE SAME ARE BEING MADE, AN EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO 
IDENTIFY THIS INDIVIDUAL WHO IS POSSIBLY SAUL MILLER, OTHER J* 
INFO CONCERNING INTERVIEW WITH WILL BE SUBMITTED BY LETTER, 

SUGGEST THAT DEPARTMENT BE ADVISED OF INTERVIEW WITH SCHNEIDER 
AND USA, SDNY WILL BE ADVISED, 


END 

NY R 17 WA ELR 


BOARDMAN 





y r* T\ 


A»9iBtant AttBrnBj/ ffentral 
Warrtn OlnBy III 


♦<o JTr. 


BBlmont 
Hay 13, 1953 




A5» 


Director, FBI 

RECORDED -9 <^S - S ^ 

FtlLiaS ROSSmSRO, 9t al 
S3PI0FAGE •R 



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f— iM 

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X-2 


r-H 


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CD 

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^ H 




I 

CXJ < 

o 


Tolso 

Ladd. 


Niclkola. 
BelaMC. 
Clew — 

Glavia 

Harbo ^ 


Tracf 

Geaity 

WoKf 

ViatCfTovd ^ 
r«le. Rc 
Hollomaa . 
5izoo 


H CP 


- , . , . confidentially 

made available to our New Torn Office reporte that have been 
aubnitted to him by prison guarda who have monitored the 
converaatione of the Rosenberga and their viaitoro* Theae 
reporta reflect the following informationt 

. • • . . ,* ■ 

On January 31, 1953, Ethel Goldberg (aiater of 
Juliua Rosenberg) viaited Ethel Rosenberg and asked her 
about the table that waa mentioned during the trial, Ethel 
Rosenberg became excited and told her aiater^in^law not to 
ask queationa that did not concern her and that she ahou2dn*t 
discuaa this matter with anyone. The report stated "It 
aeema that the table in question had o hollow base and the 
FBI waa interested in the table at one time," 

On February 3, 1953, Ethel Rosenberg asked Julius 
Rosenberg if Ethel Goldberg had asked him about the table 
and the high chair and he answered that she had, Julius told 
hia wife that he had cautioned Ethel Goldberg about talking 
and asking queationa concerning this matter. 

On February 4, 1953, the Roaenberga were viaited 
by their attorney Emanuel Bloch and they talked about the 
console table. It appeared that Julius had bought it in 
1947 or 1948, Julius requested his attorney to locate aome 
record and Bloch advised him that the records were temporary 
and a search loas fruitless. There waa aome talk concerning 
the whereabouts of the table and it waa indicated that 
was difficult to say, Julius talked about the FBI taking 
baskets and barrels of stuff from hia house. It was also 
mentioned that the table could be at Ethel Goldberg *a place. 
During this visit it waa mentioned that a Dr, Sillier was 
trying to contact a witneaa whose name sounded like Sniderman 
\g^^-'\'^hs\-^witneaa to admit that hia testimony waa perjured 
due to the threats of the FBI and subtle coaching by the FBI, 


o' '? 

t \ ^ 


1 C i '>!>'? Mvi 




Miss 


?? MAY 29 



wjju ui4 — rr 



On Fthruary 14, 1963, th0 Ito6enb0rg9 hai a visit 
from thsir childrsn and Bloch* According to Bloch the table 
joas traced to liacy^s Bepartsient Store, by a distant relative 
9/ Blooh*9 Ki/e* The relative w described as a man in 
charge of the Furniture Department of Macy^s* Bloch stated 
that the table was made by Brandt or Brand Manufacturing 
Company and "ihe tables are identified by code nuMbere 
indicating the companies to whom soldm There wae also eos^ 
mention wade of "nineteen dollars, ninety five cents and Bax* 
The report also states that Blsoh asked JUlius. if he had 
ever altered the table and fhJtue answered "Tee I get a metal 
drill from the shop and some metal screws and fixed If so that 
It would be serviceable*" Bloch also asked if there were 
grooves or anything like that on the table and Julius answered 
In the affirmative* 

Zt is believed that the Dr* Miller mentioned above, 
refers te a Dr* 3aul Miller, a psychiatrist who regularly 
visito Mthel Rosenberg at Sing Sing prison* It is alee 
believed that the individual Sniderman, mentioned above, 
refers to Ben Schneider, the lUosport Jhotegra^er who was 
a Government witness at the trial* 

On May 8, 1963, Ben Schneider was interviewed and 
contacted and he advised that two people had come to his 
store since his last visit from Bureau agents in the latter 
part of February, 1963* Be stated that one wan cane in 
and asked him if he was Schneider* Shis man wanted to 
talk about the case* Schneider refused to talk with hint* 

Me also advised that on May 6, 1953, a man came to hie ^ 
shop and asked to have passport pictures taken* Schneider 
took three picturee for the sum ef $1* Then the man was 
leaving the store he asked Schneider if he was the man 
who had taken the passport pictures in the Rosenberg bass* 

When Schneider answered that he was, ^e man asked Schneider 
if he had the negatives* Schneider answered that he did 
not* The man then left after explaining to Schneider that 
he mas a student in lam school and had been following the 
case* 


Efforts are being wads to dstsmino if the 
second individual who contacted Sohnsider is Dr* Saul Miller* 
The United States Attorney, Southern District of Sow fork 
is being advised of tho above information concorning Schneider 

Tou will be kept advised ef additional developments 
in this stutter* 

€5»68236 



2 


J 


) 


reotRM. o^Stice 

WS SICTIOK 



W^SH 1 i 
IRECTOR 


FROM NEW YORK 7 4-35CPM 

?«.ATIOS 



URGENW lOTOK*!WlVj^“jViEb ^ ^ 

JULIUS^OSENBERG, ETAL, ESP DASH R, THE FOLLOWING LETTER DATED MAY 
SIX FIFTYTHREE WHICH WAS ADDRESSED TO EMANUEL L. BLOCK, ESQ., 

ATTORNEY FOR SUBJ, WAS RECEIVED THIS DATE VIA MAIL FROM THE FIRM OF 
ROGGE, FABRICANT AND GORDON- QUOTE DEAR MANNY- AT A COI>IFERENCE HELD 
AT OUR OFFICE WITH YOU ON MAY FOURij FIFTYTHREE WE ADVISED YOU THAT 
WHAT PURPORTED TO BE A PHOTOSTAT OF A STATEMENT IN WRITING BY OUR 
CLIENT DAVID GREENGLASS, WHICH PHOTOSTAT RECENTLY APPEARED IN THE 
PARIS COMBAT, WAS AN AUTHENTIC PHOTOSTATIC COPY OF SUCH A STATEMENT 
PREVIOUSLY PREPARED AT OUR REQUEST BY DAVID GREENGLASS. WE FURTHER 
ADVISED YOU THAT THE PHOTOSTATIC COPY IN YOUR POSSESSION OF TYPED MEMOR- 
ANDUM DATED JUNE NINETEEN, FIFTY AND INITIALED QUOTE RHG UNQUOTE IS 

■ .// . 

LIKEWISE / - 

y 

AN AUTHENTIC PHOTOSTATIC COPY OF A MEMORANDUM PREPARED BY MR. ROBERT 
1 H. GOLDMAN ON THAT DATE. MR. GOLDMAN WAS AT TOAT'TIME A i^EMBER OF OUR 


IRM. THIS 


- 

GOLDMAN FROM^RUTH GREENGLASS * Hf-€ONNECT I 
, MAY 14^ 1S5 



Wr^^HE^i^V^NTITLED MATTE 


a"'" 

END OF PAGE' ONE 















4 


WA 11 

PAGE fV6 J 

4 




J 


AT OUR CONFERENCE WE FURTHER ADVISED YOU THAT THE ORIGINALS OF THE 

% 

foregoing documents were in our firm files and that THEY WERE NEVER 

RELEASED THEREFROM TO OUR KNOWLEDGE OR WITH OUR CONSENT OR APPROVAL. 

AND WE THEN ALSO ADVISED YOU THAT WE HAD NOT RELEASED THE ORIGINALS 

OR COPIES OF THE FOREGOING DOCUMENTS FOR PUBLICATION OR OTHERWISE 

* 

TO ANYONE NOT CONNECTED WITH OUR FIRM, AND/| OF COURSE, WE NEVER KNEW, 

CONSENTED, OR APPROVED OF ANY SUCH RELEASE OR USE. IN THE CIRCUMSTANCES 

• 

IT IS PLAIN, AND WE HAVE SO TOLD YOU, THAT THE DOCUMENTS, 

PHOTOSTATS OF WHICH WERE PUBLISHED AS MENTIONED AND HAVE COME INTO 
YOUR POSSESSION, MUST OF NECESSITY HAVE BEEN STOLEN FROM OUR FILES. 

WE AT THIS TIME HAVE NO KNOWLEDGE OF WHO PERPETRATED OR WAS RESPONSIBLE 
FOR ANY SUCH THEFT. WHEREVER THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR SUCH IMPROPER 
IMPAIRMENT OF THE SECURITY OF A LAWYER-S CONFIDENTIAL FILES MAY LIE, 

AND HOWEVER INNOCENT MAY BE THE MANNER IN WHICH YOU OBTAINED PHOTOSTATIC 
COPIES OF THE MATERIALS MENTIONED, WE FEEL CERTAIN THAT, HAVING BEEN 
ADVISED THAT THESE MATERIALS HAVE BEEN STOLEN FROM OUR FILES, YOU 
WILL NOT HESITATE TO RETURN TO US ANY ORIGINALS OR COPIES, PHOTOSTATIC 
OR OTHER WISE, OF ANY SUCH MATERIALS WHICH MAY HAVE COME FROM OUR 
FILES. WE THEREFORE REQUEST THAT YOU RETURN TO US ANY SUCH ORIGINALS 
OR COPIES PROMPTLY AND THAT YOU REFRAIN FROM DISCLOSING OR USING 
THE CONTENTS THEREOF IN ANY MANNER OR FASHION. OR COURSE, IF BY MEANS 
OF ANY LEGAL PROCESS YOU ARE ENTITLED TO ANY DOCUMENTS, RECORDS ' 

OR OTHER MATERIALS IN OUR CUSTODY OR CONTROL, SUCH PROCESS HAS ALWAYS 
BEEN AND REMAINS AVAILABLE TO YOU IN ORDER THAT YOU MAY SAFEGUARD 
FULLY THE RIGHTS OF YOUR CLIENTS, DEFENDANTS IN THE ABOVE-ENTITL?D 


END OF PAGE TWO 


I 


1 



t 

A 


VA n 

PAGE THREE 




A 






4 


PROSECUTION. WE DO NOT AT THIS TIME SUGGEST WHAT YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS IN 
THIS RESPECT MAY BE, NOR DO WE WAIVE ANY OBJECTIONS THAT WE MAY HAVE 
THERETO, BUT HOWEVER BROAD OR NARROW YOUR RIGHTS TO OBTAIN ACCESS 
TO THE DESCRIBED MATERIALS, WE ARE CONFIDENT YOU WILL AGREE WITH US 
DASH AND THAT YOU WILL ACT ACCORDINGLY DASH THAT THE WAY, AND THE 
ONLY WAY, TO DELVE INTO THE DATA ACCUt^LATED BY A LAWYER IN CONNECTION 
WITH THE DEFENSE OF A CRIMINAL CASE IS BY MEANS OF APPROPRIATE 
LEGAL PROCESS RATHER THAN STEALTH AND GUILE. UNQUOTE. COPIES OF 
THIS LETTER WERE FURNISHED TO BAR ASSOCIATION OF THE CITY OF NEW 
YORK, CHIEF JUDGE KNOX, US DISTRICT COURT, SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF 
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES ATTORNEY, SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK, 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION, NEW YORK, FOR YOUR INFO. 

BOARDMAN 


END 

NY R 11 WA 
SIDC 



OR 




.plgEClO® 





- Ur* Belmont . 


Asa is tan t Attorney General 

i/dr re n Clncy 1 j.J. 


::av .Zi. i 


I- » 




tirecterp FBI 

JVLJUS HOSEtBFPOp «t oi« 
iZPlOhAGE - « . ■ 

K£C0RDE0-8^ o"" ' 

Fc/e rer.ee te rcu-e to cir sie^.cranc'um of 
i^oj/ Op 19C3g' concerning c co nf creme had by imenuel 
Bloch, attorney f r the r.ceentcrgsp isith C* John 
Ho QQe and Herbert Jm Fabrtcantp attorneye for ^ovid 
Greengla Sp on L'ay 4p 19b Jm 

Cur He to Fork Office hco received, fron. 
Ur* r:op'je*e ftrn, a copy of a letter dated Uay 6, 
1963, addreeaed by Ifr* Rogge to Ur* Block* 
latter reads as felloes t 


9t 



GlaTin. 


Hirbo 

Reset) 

Tracy 


Gearty 

Mohr_.^ , 

*ttite/ro%d — 
Tcl.“, Rt'om _ 

Hollomao 

Si r.'io 

Mi IS '“tandy 


in ia 


ic-i 


th 


*':ccar uanny At c conference held at our 

you on 

XJ f* 


Offi-re 

U^'tO t 

writing by o-^r client 


:'aij 4p 1053, we adviced you that 


r::rco rted tc. tc a I ..c to sic t uf a stczccent in 


cum 


rcen-lc 

r 




i ChO to ^ ic t 

pQCf^ixly c occrcc fcris wuS ciut.ic*-. t Ic 

photo^tatic copy SuCh a atcic.-cut prcuioualy prcpcrcc 
ct our- ret^uest by j/cvid 0 rcenglcse * Se fcrt^cr advised 
you that the photcstctic copy in your pocaeca ion of _ 
typed ns.'iorandum doted Jv.r»a 19, IsGO, and inicii^eSi 
*RtiG* is likevise an antncniic p/iotostctic cepy'-if-;^ 
nemoroniun prepared by L'r* i-...hert li* 'jGld'-\ar. ou Ttnat 
date* ■' r* Golc^ccn hco at that 5is.e c sies.3er of oyr— j 
firm* T/iis letter >ccoicrcndniii pertained to info- _ ^ 

adciiof.'d ty ;Wr« doldican frsr% t * Oreenglasa- in co 
nertion with the above entitle-^ T.atier* A-t cur 
ference loe further edased ycu ihet the originals 
the fc rege ing dccgzxc:^ to were in cur /yru filec cr.a'i 
that they sjc rc never rcli.aos:’ idcrtfroTn to our know^ 
ledge Of tn or. c- proual* And we taen 

also cES«i8^ 40*1 ' MsL ao, rclcaaed the criginale 
or cc-iiga c ■ t'iC ffi.pec-oinr ciocuc.c'uts for publication 
or ■fo'-c^^dhcy/.H^B l^t.ncci/ed with cur firm, and, 

of eourae, we nc.ver]:^kiie\Jj, c necnied, or approved of any 
auch r<B 6 <i 93 !F'.: 0 J!?!. 5 >ac# In ifie^.circusistcricea it ia P^^n, 
and we have so told yea.:, that the docu-centa, fnotosiata 
cf which i'-cre publichsd as .^c?. tier*:, t: cna :ic.ve 


CO US 


6 


o 

c/ 


/ / 


i 


i — FBI 

1 2 ie53 

MAILED 25 



Tol*oo 

L.dd 

Nidiola 

Beimonl 

Clew 

GUvin 

Marbo 

Rosea 

Tracy 

Geajry _ 

.Mohr..- .. 
Vinietro^d . 
Tele. Room 
ilollotran - 
•Si zoo — 


year po$aes9iQn^ met of Mcoaalty have bson 9 to 2 ob 
Gur filee* -to ot tiiio haoo no bnoiolodge of 

Viho perpetrated or loaa reaponoiblo for any auch theft* 
therever the ree- one ibiliiy for eueh tnptoper txpatr^- 
nent of the eeciirtty of a lauy£r*a ccaftdentiol filsa ' 
nay lie, and hci^eoer innocent be the manner in which 
you ciiained pho toctetic copies of the Tuatcriclo 
it.cntioned, tc feel certcin thei, having been advieed 
that ihi’- e oMtcriala hc.je bee^ stolen fros. oup files, 
you will not heeitete to return tc ue any orfginala 
or ccties, p .otoetctic or e ther wise, of any aueft ncteriala 
si.icht.ay have cc.ne /rora ciir~|T2t?a# »e therefore request 
t-het return to us any originala or cepiee prossptly 

c-; that yoM ref rain frott dipelosinp or \iaing the etnienta 
liCrac/ <r any CiCr.rk r or feshipn. 


C 


conraa, if by ~;cc/?a 


prcccsi nas aiixiya 


* r 


■tc 


cj’cn-^^an id 


or C‘r 

He rc tat t : i 
t .1 r . w_' Lct ‘‘ g; 

richzd 


^ c 

It 


Of any legal pr;;ce5a ycu are t^ititled to any do^ur.ente, 
r:'c::rds or other aa teriuls in i;ir c-aatotiy or control, such 

bi.en and retains avc^ilable ioW/Ou in j 
cc h'ejua rd fu i 2 !f the: riyhto of'.yjcur 
»v. tiic cc.o^i,-€r>Ci ijleu prcoecdficn, 
suj.<:..tp.-ic.t ydxir leyal rights in 
ij be, i.er u<w \ cive obJecHons L'ist 
have thereto* hc^^ev^r brotsfi or narrow y^ur 

tc ob ^ain cccc&a to tJiC deacritied srateriala, xc are 
CO nf i : e nt you will agree with ua • onA that you. \wilL act 
cc Grd.nyly - that the way, and ^he only peg, to delve into 


oc ura .nyiy - znes vne way, anu tne onty pay, zo aeive in 
the note a- ca. >^-.-.lcic(i by c lapye^ in ennnacticn pith the 
defense of c cTi'>'.iTM.l case ia by ’Aecna 'Of apfjropricte ley 


procc-.c 


rather tAcn 0 tea 1-th end imtle*'^\ 


al 


It is cur unde rstandiagt. that: eepi'ka cf t -.is 
letter have clso b..Gr, ritruiohsci t© the’ Bor Aesccicticn cf 
t/»c Cit.v o ' iorh, fenior I* ii^* Lifirict Audye l\nc£, 
r>C!itho:rr, i-icirict of Aec Hr:-;, ahi the Vnixed gtatea 
Attorney cf t hcuthsrn .district of hew Tork4-^ 


Ihe foregoir.r, is < nrnished for your ihfor'c-tt-on* 



* ^ 


rei>€fiAL BUilEAU or INVESTIGAT1CN 
u. s. department of justice 

GOHriWiMIlOHS SECTION 

MAY 6 '953 


WASH^GTON FROM NEW YORK isl 6 P 

m,' IWCPJ-ATION tciTSifei'..T 



■I 




M~. T,Ai n X i 




ilr, Il.irbo 

Ivir. R -sc-n 

Mr. Tracy 



Mr. Gcaity 

Mr. Mohr_ 

Mr. Winterrowd- 

Tele. Room 

Mr. Kollonian 

Mr* Sizoo 

Miss Gandy 


JULIUS ROSENBERG, ET AL, ESP-R. RUTH GREENGLASS ADVISED TODAY THAT 

/>. VV 

SHE HAD BEEN INTERVIEWED BY MRM GOLDMAN OF ROGGE-S OFFICE IN-:iUNE FIFTY. 
GOLDMAN WANTED TO KNOW SOME OF HER HUSBAND, DAVID-S, BACKGROUND. (VT 
SHE TOLD HIM OF HER COURTSHIP BY DAVID AND LATER MARRIAGE AND OTHER ^ 

MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY TOLD GOLDMAN VARIOUS ITEMS* ABOUT DAVID. SHE- 

h/J ^ ' 

RECALLED THAT DAVID HAD EITHER PNEUMONIA OR THE FLU WHEN HE WAS 

V- : 

FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THAT HE WAS ALONE IN THE UPStAIRS 


APARTMENT. HE HAD A VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE AND IN HIS ^IJfcLIRIOUS STATE 
HE RAN OUT OF THE APARTMENT TRYING TO GET HIS PAJAMAS^F. SHE TOLD 


GOLDMAN THAT DAVID REFERRED TO HIS PAJAMAS AS LEAD Pi^J^S AND THAT 
THERE WERE ELEPHANTS AROUND. THIS IS THE STATEMENT THAT WAS TAKEN 
FROM ROGGE-S OFFICE, PHOTOGRAPHED AND WHICH WAS READ AT THE RALLY 
AT RANDALLS ISLAND ON THE THIRD LAST. IT IS BELIEVED THAT THIS 


J, 


STATEMENT WILL BE USED TO DISCREDIT DAVID AS A WITNESS. RUTH STATED 
THAT THIS INCIDENT WAS A FAMILY JOKE AND WAS WELL KNOWN TO JULIUS AND 
ETHEL ROSENBERG AND HAD BEEN RELATED ON MORE THAN ONE OCCASION WHEN 


MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY WERE TALKING OF TH|^-^CTIONS ^MBERS, 

PARTICULARLY WHEN THEY WERE SICK. SHE AGAIN ADV^D THAT SHE TOL ^ 




DAVID ROSENBERG ON MAY FIRST LAST THAT SHE DID NOf 




THAT THE 


CONSOLE TABLE RECENTLY SECURED BY THE "NATIONAL GUARDIAN" WAS THE 


/ 


END PAGE! 



^ vj MAY 2 9 1953 


■.7- 


> RECORDED - 72 


4 


% , 


3 




WA 13 PAGE TWO 

1 TABLE SHE SAW IN THE ROSENBERG HOME. SHE TOLD DAVID ROSENBERG THAT 
THE TABLE SHE SAW HAD BEEN HOLLOWED OUT UNDERNEATH AND WAS FITTED UP 
.FOR PHOTOGRAPHING PURPOSES. SHE HAS HAD NO FURTHER CONTACT W“lH 
DAVID ROSENBERG OR ANY REQUEST FROM HIM SINCE MAY FIRST LAST. IT IS 
BELIEVED THAT IN VIEW OF THE RECENT DEVELOPMENTS AND THE MANNER IN WHICH 
THE STATEMENTS OF DAVID AND RUTH GREENGLASS WERE OBTAINED FROM THE OFFICE 
OF 0. JOHN ROGGE, THAT THIS CONSOLE TABLE IS NOT GENUINE. MR. THOMAS 

> 

KELLY OF MACYS DEPARTMENT STORE WAS CONTACTED AND HE HAS AGREED TO OBTAlV 
THE rOLLOWING INFO CONFIDENTIALLY. HE WILL SECURE THE NAMES, POSITION, 
AGE AND LENGTH OF SERVICE OF ALL BUYERS, ASSISTANT BUYERS AND SALES 
PEOPLE IN THE FURNITURE DEPARTMENT AT MACYS TOGETHER WITH THE NAMES 

1 

OF ALL CHECKERS AND MARKERS IN MACYS WAREHOUSE AND THE IDENTITY 
OF PERSONS IN THE COMPTROLLERS OFFICE WHO WOULD HAVE KNOWLEDGE OF MACYS 
CODE NUMBERING SYSTEM. MR. KELLY WILL ALSO SECURE THE NUMBER OF 
TABLES OF THE TYPE IN QUESTION THAT HAD BEEN PURCHASED AND SOLD BY 
THEM. WHEN THIS INFO IS OBTAINED, THE NAMES OF THESE INDIVIDUALS WILL 
BE SEARCHED THROUGH THE NY INDICES TO DETERMINE WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY 
ASSOCIATION WITH THE CP OR WITH THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE 

ROSENBERGS. BUREAU WILL BE ADVISED OF THE RESULTS OF THIS INQUIRY. 
BOARDMAN 

END 


NY R 13 WA RD 




a 
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•» 

^- * ^ S-4 

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ix! ■■:'> ** 
p.H I 

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fd-m 


Mr. To!soi 
Mr. Ladrf.. 
1^1 r. ?v » ',', 


AIR-TEL \ 

FEDEBAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIOR 

UNITED STATES DEPABTliENT GT JUSTICE 
NEW yoRK,>vi6/53 

Transmi t the following Teletype m^sage to: v/BUHEAU 
JULIUS'ROSENBERO, EP AL, espionage - R, REBTILET 
REVIEW OP PILES AND INTERVIEWS WITH AGENTS IN AN EP 



Mr. 

Mr. 


Mr. 

Cti ' vjn _ 

Mr. 


Mr. 

F ... 

Mr. 

Trary. 

Mr. 



Mr. 

M'hr 

V,.. 

* ~ r* — ' i • r' 


w •ilonan 

DJ 


ING 



TERMINE WHEN DAVID GREENGIASS PURNISHED INFORMATION 
THE CONSOLE TABLE. THE BUREAU IS ADVISED THAT NONE OP THE 

AGENTS CURRENTLY IN NY, HAD ANY KNOWLEDGE OP THE PACTS CON-^j 

/ 

CERNING THE CONSOLE TABLE AT THE TIME OP THE ARREST OP JULIUS 
ROSENBERG, NOR DO ANY OP THESE AGENTS JffiCALL^SEEraG^ra 
ROSEN B^G il^ARTMMT, A CONSOLE TABIE OP TIffi TWE RECMTLY 
BROUGHT FORTH BY THE "NATIONAL GUARDIAN". THE ENTIRE PILE OP 
EAVID GREENGIASS HAS BEEN REVIEWED, AND NO INFO CONCERNING THE 
CONSOIE TABLE APPEARS THEREIN. THE BUREAU'S ATTENTION IS 
DIRECTED TO THE REPORT OP SA JAMES P. lEE IN CAPTIONED CASE, 
DATED 9/8/50. THE PERIOD OP THIS REPORT IS 8/7-9/7/50. ON 
PAGE 23 OP THIS REPC«T, THE LAST PARAGRAPH, THERE IS THIS RE- 
FERENCE TO A TABLE: "ROSENBERG TOLD HIM THAT HE HAD PURCHASED 
THIS CAMERA AT WILLOUGHBY'S CAMERA SHOP IN NYC, AND THAT HE 
SOMETIMES FASTENS THE CAMERA TO A DROP LEAP TABLE IN HIS HOME.*" 
THE PILES OP INSTANT CASE HAVE BEEN REVIEWED, AND NO REFERINCES 
TO THE CONSOLE TABIE HAVE BEEN LOCATED, TO DATE, EXCEPT IN THE 




BUREAU (REGULAR MAIL) (65-58236) 

» I A 

jah.^^(# 6) .ccoRttO-iO 

FX-1!0>». 

.1 Agei 




, . 5348 

Approved:. 


MAY 


^853 



Per. 


Special Agent in Charge 


AIR-TEL V 

FEDERAL BUEBAU OF INVESTIGATION ' 

.JAH:MEH 

65-15348 UNITED STATES DEPABTUENT OF JUSTICE 

NEW YORK, 5/16/53 

PAGE 2 

Transmit the following Teletype message to: 

SUMMARY TRIAL TELETYPES SUBMITTED TO THE BUREAU. ANOTHER 
REVIEW OP THESE PILES IS NOW BEING MADE, IN AN EFFORT TO- 
DETERMINE WHEN THE INFORMATION CONCERNING THE CONSOLE TABLE 
WAS FIRST RECEIVED PROM DAVID. THE BUREAU WILL BE ADVISED 
OP THE RESULTS OP THIS ADDITIONAL SEARCH. 


BOAREMAN 


Approved: 


Sent U Per. 


Special Agent in Charge 


SAC, Sew Tork (6S<~^1S34Q) 
Ptvetor, FBI (65»56236) 


May 22, 1953 


JULIUS R0SENBSR9, ST Al 
SSPIONAOS - B 




atcoHOtS) ' 


1/ 






Reurairmtel dated May 16, 1959» 


Tour attention is directed to the Sew Tork 
report of SA Leo JET, Frutkin, dated August 5, 1950, in 
the David Greenglass ease reflecting results of various 
interviews with Greenglass on July 14, 16, 18, and 20, 
2950, On page SO of this report it is stated that 
Greenglass advised Rosenberg bought a Leica camera 
from Willoughby *s, and he sometimes fastened the camera 
to a drop-leaf table in his hone. Tour attention is 
also directed to New Tork teletype dated July 15, 1950, 
in the above»captioned case, reporting interview with 
Ruth Greenglass^ The latter also advised of the purchase 
of the camera by Rosenberg for use in his photocopy work 
and stated that Rosenberg had rigged up an attachment 
for the camera to be fitted on the bottom of the dros» 
leaf tables 


You are requested to complete the review of 
your files and promptly report the results thereof so 
that the Department may be advised, Expedite, 

APLsawngiA^y^'^ 


Tolsoo 

I.add 

Nichols 

Beltnoot 



Glsvio 

Hsrbo 

Roseo 

Tracy 

Ceany 

lohf 

'inrenowd 
Tiff. Room . 

Uomao 



NOTE: Greenglass testified that Rosenberg told him the 

Russians gave the R osenbergs as a gift a console 
table which was adapted by Rosenberg for photographing 
espionage material, Rosenberg denied this on the stand, 
stating he bought the console table at Maoey *s. Table was 
not produced at the trial, Rosenberg attorney now claims 
to have found table and states it was in Rosenberg apartment 
at time of arrest, indicating Greenglass withheld this 
information from the FBI, otherwise FBI would have seised it 
at time of arrest. It appears, in event Supreme Court denies 
certiorari, defense will move for a new trial on newly 
discovered evidence, using console table story for one of 
these points, / 



/ in *»2 ®e80 OISE '" 



WSoX£i 






/- - / 




I 


Office Memorandum • 



SUBJECT; JULIUS ROSENBERG, ET AL 
ESPIONAGE - R 
(BuFile 65^58836) 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

DATE: May 22, 1953 



VUcerrowd — 
Tele. Room. 
HoUoneQ — 

Miu Geady. 


Reference is made to the memorandum dated 
May 21, 1953, from Mr, Nichols to Mr, Tolson advising 
that Robert Stern of the Solicitor General *a office had 
reported that a Mr, Fyke Farmer, an attorney, had filed 
separate papers with the Supreme Court in the Rosenberg 
case, Mr, Stern requested that he be furnished any 
information in our files concerning Farmer, 

RE C ONMENDA T I ON 

It is recommended that the attached copy of a 
Bureau nemcrandum to Mr, Olney, dated May 22, 1953, 
concerning Mr, Farmer, be forwarded to Mr, Nichols for 
his information and assistance, and that the information 
contained therein be furnished to Mr, ^tern. 


. . - ^ - T ' rr-'V ^ 

V -f ‘•"'■•"S'*., - ‘ . 

VlC&I- v;- 

: '7- 


AFLyawnoe'^'-’ 



Attachment 





' • vC ^ ^ 



^ . • ?_/ 
\i ' 



Assistant Attorney General 
Wcrren Clney III 



MR, B Ely OUT 


May 22 j 1953 


Director, TBl 



JULIUS ROSES B ERU, et «1 
ESPIONAUE • R 




Reference is ncde to our_ meiaorandun of May -7^ 

1953, reporting information fron a Confidential source 
concerning one Fyte farmer, Nashville, Tennessee, attorney, 
tcho has advanced the theory that the Rosenberg Case can be 
thrown out of court on a habeas corpus because it was tried 
under the old espionage law instead of the Atomic Energy ^ 
Control Act* - , , 

V. - r - 

Our files reflect that a fyke farmer, undoubtedly 
identical with the above'-mentioned individual, was a proc* 
ticing attorney at Nashville, Tennessee, for many years% 
About 1945 or 294C he reportedly became intensely interested 
in world government to the extent that he gave up hie law 
practice and has since devoted full time to urging estab^ , 
lishmsr.t of a world government* Ac^uaintancee at Nashville, 
Tenuee&ec regcrd ’^^r'r.er os on imoractical idealist. They 
state that whirl e they do not believe ^ar er would ever 6ub^ 
scribe to a Communist eysierr. o-' jo verrirncnt, he could be led 
by Co:r.nuni:-it^» Fcr\er was a signer o'" the Amici Curiae 
brieC “ilsd with the United States Court of Apieala, Second 
Circuit, urging reversal of the contempt or court conviction 
of several attorneys in the conspiracy trial of the eleven 
Communist leaders* 


ir* ’dwerd Ransall, o reporter of the "New fork 
Times," has advised our New York Office that Former visited \ 
him on May 15, 1963* farmer told Ransall that a ''ter atudying\ 
the Rosenberg Case record, he did not believe the court had 
the power to invoke the death penalty because of a techni- 
cality in the indictment* farmer stated he had submitted 
a writ of habeas corpus to the United States Supreme Court J 
but did not pay the filing fee of $100 and, therefore, a 
writ has not been issued* \jaraer cdoised Ransall thet he i 
had been invited by Joseph^^ainin, Chairman of the National I 
Cemnittee to ,^ea’-re Justice %n the Roaenbergs Case, to 
New York City, where he attended a conference, at whif^h 
manucl Bloch, attorney for the Rosenbergs, was present* 

Bloch told Brainin and Termer that he was oppo6<M to the 
action taken by "armor end intended to do nothing about the 





t^ehnioclity in tfin indiotaent nt thin tinn» According 
to Former^ Bloch hao aduiood the Suprono Court end pio 
Attorney Qoneral that ho io not in oynpathy vtth the 
action of Tarnor* 

The foregoing ia for your inforaiationm 


66^saS36 


STANDARO 


molM 


Ofice Metmrandum • UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 


TO 


VS.OM t 


SOB J BCT; 


MR, 



BELMONT 


MRyC^": SENNRICH 


JULIUS. ROSEN BEBS 
ETHEL ’ROSEN BERO 
ESPIONAOE - R 

/■ ■ 


A 


/ 


(P 




J 




I 


Tolsoo 
id. 


DATE: May 22, 1953 2*^?' 


Belmont — 

Clea 

GUvio 

Harbo 

Rosen — ■ 

Tracy 

Geaity 

Mohr 

Wioierrowd — 
Tele. Room 

HoUonian 

&100 

Miss Gsody 


I called Supervisor Vincent McCarthy in the y 

Boston Office, who was acting as SAC, regarding tfte / 

Washington City News Service release today {May 22) 
which quoted former AEC Commissioner Sunner T, Pike as 
saying it is a reasonable inference that the Rosenbergs 
worked with possibly two spy groups that have been 

caught, I instructed that Pike be contacted for detaxls, 

T further instructed that the results of the interview 
with Pike be submitted to the Bureau by teletype. 


ACTION: 


This matter will be followed and you will be 
advised of the results of this interview. 


CEEtLL 




0 



Mjr. Mohr 

Mr* Wintenowd 


Tele. Room. 
Mr. Hollomao 

Mr. Sizoo 

Miss Gandy . 


1 

I 


I 


(PIKE) 

AUGUSTA* NE*- -FORMER AEC COMMISSIONER SUNNER T. PIKE SAID IT IS *A 
REASONABLE INFERENCE* THAT CONVICTED ATOMIC SPIES JULIUS AND ETHEL 
ROSENBERG WORKED WITH POSSIBLY TWO SPY GROUPS THAT NEVER HAVE BEEN 
CAUGHT. 

”I HAVE NO PROOF. IF I HAD. THE FBI WOULD HAVE GOTTEN IT.* PIKE SAID 
IN HIS STATE HOUSE OFFICE. HE ^W IS CHAIRMAN OF THE MAINE PUBLIC 
UTILITIES COMMISSION. 

PIKE MADE THE STATEMENT WHEN QUERIES ABOUT A SPEECH HE DELIVERED 
YESTERDAY IN PORTLAND. IN THAT SPEECH. HE SAID HE BELIEVED TWO 
communist spy groups would be "smoked OUT* IF RtSENBERG AND HIS WIFE 
TALKED, ^ 

THE ROSENBERGS WERE Sj^TENCED TO DIE IN THE ELECTRIC CHAIR FOR i 

ALLEGEDLY REVEALING A-BOMB SECRETS TO RUSSIA. I 

PIKE SAID TODAY THAT MRS. ROSENBERG IS MORE APT TO "SPILL ALL* THAN 
HER HUSBAND TO SAVE HER LIFE, 

"ROSENBERG IS THE TOUGH GUY-* HE SAID, "HE ISN’T THE KIND TO TALK. 

BUT MRS. ROSENBERG ISN’T AS STRONG A CHARACTER." 

PIKE SAID THAT BOTH "WITHOUT DOUBT HAVE INFORMATION ABOUT 

CO- CONSPIRATORS WHICH HASN’T BEEN REVEALED," 

"IT’S A REASONABLE INFERENCE THAT THE ROSENBERGS WORKED WITH AND HAVD 

INFORMATION ABOUT OTHER, POSSIBLY TWO, WARTIME ATOMIC SPY GROUPS WHICH 1 
Urnr mtupp To.rvrn • ur e.Tn * 


WERE NEVER TRACKED DOWN." HE SAID. 


5/21— E61140A 



masMT 

TELBTTPM 


O 


MAT SS, 1953 

SAC, MEW rORK 
CLSfSLAMB 


JULIUS RCSEWBEBC, ET ML, ESFIOMAGS • J. SUFREMS COURT SEMISS 
WRITS or CERTIORARI TO ROSEMBERGS AMD SOBELL TBIS DATS* MSW"T0BI 


AMD CLEVELAND SHOULD IMTEMSIFT COVERAGE OF OTHER SUBJECTS UNDER 


INVESTIGATION AS POSSIBLY INVOLVED IN ROSENBERG NETWORK AND BE 


4/ 


DOUBLY ALERT FOR ANT ACTIVITY ON FART OF THESE INDIVIDUALS 




INDICATING UNUSUAL CONTACTS FOR FOSSIBILITT OF FLIGHT* BUREAU 
SHOULD BE IHHEDIATELT ADVISED OF ANY IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENTS* 

HOOVER 


/r- 


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KUj • : 

‘■iS.RalN Ib 


^Ae 


COPIES DESTROYED 
■ae .MOV IHPSP S2 g 

'^AUta^ O"^-- ■ ,.:'5 

^'ichoIs 

Sclmont^ ^ ^ 

o5— 5<3S5^> . , 

CilAvIn— ^ ' 

Hafbo 

Ruscn 

Tracy 

C.#-Any — 

I'iohf 

Tinitf;row«i . _ 

Roofl 

'^I'aaman _ 

■'^iss 



RF.C0RDED-3^J^_ 








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Office ^Astnoradduffi • united stat js government 


PKOM ( 


t UBJBCT; 


m. A, H. BWI^l 


MR. F. J. Bj±m 


^0 



JULIUS ROSENBERG, ET AL 
ESFIONAC-E - R 


Tolsoo 

. _ _ . Lkdd—/L 

DATE: May ^5. 1953 

^ ^ ./Brlmoot 

* Cle** 

GUvio. 

/ H»fbo — 

Rosen 

Trscy 

Gesfty 

^ * Mohr_ 

■ Vtocerrovd ^ 

Tele. Roo«> 
Hottoosn — 

SisDO 

Miss Gasdy . 


At 1:43 today, SA Howard Fletcher, Jr, of the 

hFO perso nally d elivered to the Bureau a list of cases in 
which the Supreme Court had rendered decisions on May 25, 1953, 

Under No. 687 listed as Rosenberg vs. United States, 
the petition for writ of certiorari was denied. The order of 
the United States Court of Appeals of February 17, 1953 . grantin 
a stau of execution was v aca ted. Mr. Justice Douglas was 

the "^jinion the p'eiition for certiorari should be granted. 

This list of cases is attached for your further 
information. 

It should also be noted that under No. 719 ^^Sobell vs^ 
United States, ' the petition for writ of certiorari uas denied. 




FJBtmer 


Attachment 
















7 . aY'V<* 


jeVa 


Lf ' S' If ' 


•>=: - 

^ S. 




eyJUN 3 1953 




i 


i 

• ^ 

« I 

^ > 

Monday j May 25 th 

No« 694 GORMAN VS. CIOY OP NEW YORK 

Per Curiam : The motion to dismiss Is granted and 
the appeal Is dismissed for the want of a sub- 
stantial federal question. 

711 POCKMAN VS. LEONARD 

Per Curiam ; The appeal Is dismissed for the want 
of a substantial federal question. 


230 RADIO OFFICERS' UNION ETC. VS. NATIONAL LABOR 
RELATIONS BOARD 

301 NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD VS. INTERNATIONAL 
BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS ETC, 

371 GAYNOR NEV;S CO., INC. VS. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS 
BOARD 

These cases are ordered restored to the 
docket for reargument. 

558 UNITED STATES VS. FIVE GAMBLING DEVICES ETC. 

In this case probable Jurisdiction Is noted 
and the case Is transferred to the summary docket, 

64 l PARTMAR CORPORATION VS, PARAMOUNT PICTURES THEATRES 
CORPORATION 

The petition for writ of certiorari Is granted 
limited to the Issue of dismissal of the counter- 
claims. 

649 THEATRE ENTERPRISES, INC. VS. PARAMOUNT FILM DISTRIBUTIN'^ 
CORP. 


) 


496 

680 

690 

708 

716 

717 



684 ; 

685 ! 



QUINN * SIMONDS ABRASIVE CO. 

HARVEY ALUMINUM, INC. VS. AMERICAN CYANAMID CO. 

UNITED STATES VS. ROLLAND 

PANCHON & MARCO, INC. VS. PARAMOUNT PICTURES, INC. 

AMALGAMATED ASS'N OP STREET, ELECTRIC RWY, & MOTOR 
COACH EMPLOYEES ETC. VS. SOUTHERN BUS LINES, INC. 

AMALGAMATED ASS'N OP STREET, ELECTRIC RWY, & MOTOR 
COACH EMPLOYEES ETC. VS. SOUTHERN BUS LINES, INC. 

SOBELL VS. UNITED STATES 

PATTERSON VS. ANDERSON ETC. 

COMPANIA SUD-AMERICANA ETC. VS. MOLLICA 

The petitions for writs of certiorari In the^e 
cases are severally denied. 

MARACHOWSKY VS. UNITED STATES 

MARACHOWSKY VS. UNITED STATES 

The motions to dispense with printing the 
record are granted. The petitions for writs of 
certiorari ar e denied. 

ROSENBERG VS. UNITED STATES 

The motions for leave to file briefs of 
National Lawyers Guild and Joseph Brainin et al , , 

I . I as amici curiae are denied. The petition for writ 

I of c ertiorari is deniedj The order of the United 

I States Court of Appeals of Pebruary 17, 1953, 
granting a stay of execution is vacated. Mr. 
Justice Black and Mr. Justice Prankfurter referring 




t< 


No . 721 


SCHOI , , /S . SCHOLIA 

\ 

The motion to proceed on the typewritten 
record la granted. The petition for writ of 
certiorari is denied. 


450 Misc. 

SMITH VS. PEOPLE OP THE STATE OP CALIPORNIA 

464 Misc. 

SCHOLIA VS. SCHOLIA 

466 Misc. 

SNELL VS. PLORIDA 

467 Misc. 

PENNSYLVANIA EX REL. BAERCHUS VS. BURKE 

468 Misc . 

IN RE PAYSOPP TINKOPP 

475 Misc. 

LILYROTH VS. PEOPLE OP THE STATE OP ILLINOIS 

478 Misc. 

BYRD VS. NEW YORK CENTRAL R.R. CO. 

479 Misc. 

BERG VS. CRANOR 

433 Misc. 

PETTUS VS. CRANOR 

484 Misc. 

MOUNT OLIVE PIRE BAPTIZED HOLINESS CHURCH OP 
GOD VS. GROW 

486 Misc. 

KOALSKA VS. SWENSON 

488 Misc . 

HINKLE VS. SKEEN 

491 Misc. 

CONWAY VS. WATERS 

493 Misc. 

HOTIANOVICH VS. MICHIGAN 

494 Misc. 

CROWDER VS, BURKE 

497 Misc. 

HEATH VS. NORTH CAROLINA 

The petitions for writs of certiorari 

these cases are severally denied. 

482 Misc. 

HOLLOWAY VS. PEOPLE OP THE STATE OP MICHIGAN 


The motion for leave to file petition 
for writ of mandamus is denied. 


y 

An order Is entered approving a schedxile of fees to be 
charged In the United States Court of Customs and Patent 
Appeals. 

\ 

Order 

The Court will take a recess from today until Monday, 
June 1, from that day until Monday, June 8, and from that 
day until Monday, June 15 » upon which day It will adjourn 
for the term unless otherwise ordered. No motions, except 
motions for admission to practice, will be received after 
the session next before the date fixed for adjournment 
of the term. 






O^e vAsmofondum • united states goveenmbnt 


TO 


THE DIRECTOR 


DATlt Vay 22, 1953 


r 


nOM r 


MR, D. M, LADD 


WILLIAM AVERY CRAWFORD 


Tdan 


SYNOPSIS t 


-•< 


TfMy 


T«lo. 


'■ < ' Files reviewed pur auant to your requeat of May 22,1953,^ 
Crawford appointed by Department of State aa foreign aeruioe officer 
March 27, 1941, and at present ia First Secretary, Consul, United 
States Embassy, Paris, France, la considered political specialist 
or political head of American Embassy in Paris, ' 








"4 . 


yyinosfitigation in Loyalty case 

Crawford developed no other disloyal or derogatory information, 
’Crawford was ^listed ^as a peference bu Jonathan Thursa, State Departmen 
employee. 






RECOMMENDATION t 


■ ^ V'- ' J ■ • 

-i-irT 




None , -Tor ,your ii\forMat ton. 


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'JUNI15. t953 

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to the Diroctor 

A/ro* ,Jf^« Jf» M» Ifidd 

•T***'* ■'^j* ^ . 


BSz WILLIAM A fSRT CRAWTOBL 


-■/’ 1^ ' .' * * ‘ . V *• 

■ •■ ■' .— ^ ■* * • ". . V • ■ 

p ^AIIS t ■ ' ' ^ 

. r>-.v<: *v^ ', - a"'' • • % . • 

/ ,:r ^ wnuam . 


rilKa* ff/'ow/ord »aa born January 14, 1915, in 

MOV TO rk City. So io tho oon of John Raymond Crawford and ,; 
..^■^^^^^Wouliho'Aoory. ^ So io uarriod to tho former Barbara Oardnor and_ 

' ii:'^t^-''^i'hao throo ohildron* 'Crawford roooiped hio education at the sorth 


r" 

«* 


'~j fi-z. 


ih# Bouthcliffo School, England; 
n^MW?tho Anorioan Sigh School of fario, end the Chateau So Burfia, ^ 
f?W^-^Eranco.^ ..roc oived a B.A. dogroo from Sauerford Collbge, -i-.-r.-rr:] 
^^pkt^iladolpHia, Sonnoyluania, in 1936 and took additional pourooo \ 

tho Univoroity of Madrid, fcalp Libro^doo Scienoeo Politiqueo; 

> Tt^M ^ thAM mmfil numd hi! ±hMt ' 




><i v- — 






^ Uni vefo it y. Crawford wao omployod by tho 

'J^^^^^i^.^^HTullor iruoh Company, Waohington, S. C*! tho Souglao Aircraft, ;:f.; 

Company, Santa Monica, California, and tho Boot and Company, Mew y 
;'yi ■3?%^,.^ Cits, betwoon 1936 and 1941* ^ Be was appointed by the State i_ 

rtmont ao 'a foreign ooruico officer on March 2?, 194U Bo 
boon aooignod by tho State jpepartmont to Sabana, Cuba; MoocOw, 
vaaa; the Popartmont of State, Washington, 2). P\* and at present .,^ 
holds the position of TirsV Secretary, consul. United State s^^^ 
Embassy, Paris, Trance • So io considered at the present the 
poiitioal opecialist , or political Mead of the American ^pgba^esy - j, 
<n\Poria;;- V'^-^'r ■ •■ --"a'/ >'A vr' 


^0^gg^po-partme nt 


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I 




'''^:---2n''M^r^^ 1,' 1961, the pepa.rtment of State specifically 
;Jr««ttiata<l tAa bureau to conduct a full- field Loyalty investigation 
9on Crawford under the pro visions of Exeouti ve Order ,9635 (Loyalty 
tMf OoOornmont Employees Investigations). ; 


T;z~.-..-u{r>Tr:ft 








Sv.'Ai-*- 










*T -‘v^ St ■;. 


r^a CPA has been cited by the Attorney General of the United, States 
as being a Communist organisation. 






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MeMo to tht Director 
from, Mr, D. JT. Ladd 


BE s WILLIAM AVERT CRAWFORD 


jjur my i,#ic 

courae oj »/»»« %nueetigat\on by the Bureau, all offices 

participating oontacted ~their informnta in the security field 
arid none of them had dny‘' information of a derogatory nature 
poncerning William Avery Crawford, All people interviewed .rV 
recommended him favorably, [J^e Bureau requested the Department 
of State to oonduct the necessary investigation on Crawford in ■ - 
Babana Cuba f Paris, France, and Moscow,' USSR, which were the ’ 
places where ho had ^been assigned as a foreign service officer. 

The State Department, "under date of June S6, 1951, forwarded to 
the Bureau letters from the above ^pohao si es in the above-mentioned 
pountries all of , which rpf looted favorably upon Crawford, 








L-V 


By letter: dated June,!?, 1958, the United States Civil 
Service Commission, after having reviewed the Bureau's inveaiigaii 
reports eh Crawford, advised that he was ^eligible on loyalty," 


ve 


•4 - ^ 


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^The.^BureauZopnducted a Loyalty investigation concerning 
Jonathan ThuroM, State.Departmehi pnployee, from August 3, 1951 
to January 81, 1952, yfnvestigation developed that William A, - 
Crawford was listed as d referenoe by Thurss , when the latter filed 
his application for Federal employment with the Devartment of Stat 
on June 9, 1950, 






■wr..:.rstei:^ 


. . J ’ ■ * -i 






j’i 


^‘ThUrss VOS 


_ invervjewea auring xnc _ 

aourse oj sne Coplcn^^nvesxigation,. regarding this fact and advised 
:at hp-^pas pt a loss to understand how his name became involve^. 




r**, : L. 


It was also disoiosed during the course of the Loyalty investigation 


^^^^^F ^ Bpenjienied French citiaenship in 1926 because of 
‘^'Communist activities, ^ The Loyalty ^investigation' concerning Thurss 
completed and reports furnished the Civil Service Commission on 
Zfr^'''~^^-'~-^\'^huary 21, ^1952, ■- Bo determination on loyalty has been received i 

(^^Mfl.jSeryioe Cammissioh, 


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Mk. D. , ■' 

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srurM <r ##1*35!"' 

»i»ter~in-la\B Mnber of CPA* ^ 

favorably Crawford, Crawford li^ed ao 

W«r“»c; */ Thur$. ,lU8*<t pf *.,b.r. ,.. 






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inuootigatiuo ropor 
"ojigibio jon Xoyalty 




:tng Jonathan fhuroM, ~:8tat0 ^popaftnont 
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ftatnod by a highly Oon/tgontial oourdo p^-^niiary_‘[X9,;‘^:^^M^i 
v^th'uroo wao'tntorvtowod during tbA dourP0'''i>f Jlho 
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ioAa..;i<f..**Ad*PAtOnd bO» HIAZ-MA# ‘bAOOAA 


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dl«o diioioatfd during tho pdurpo bf ;tho L^lty ^^^:^c^Uh _ 
that Thuroo had. boon dohtod Prohoh ai.ti.at nohip in.'.:,X926,:-jbo.pauPo^^;;_[.y^^:s. 
of Comnuniai aetiviiioo, —Tho loyalty tnuoottgatipn oonootping 
Thuroo wao ppmplotod and roporia furntahod tho ^orpioo v 

Conmiaoion .bn January 21, 1932% .Mo datarAlAailOA oa loyalty 
■haa boon roooivod from tho Pivil Soruioo Vommiooion, 

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VTAHDARD 






Office lS/[.efnor(M^1fl • united staies government 


TO 


FROM 


StTBJBCT: 


un. A. S, 


MR. C4 






o 

JULIUS ROSENBERG 
ETHEL 'ROSENBERG 
ESPIONAGE - R 


/ 




Tolsoo 


DATE: May 26 j 1953 

eeltnoDt 


Clc«- 

Glftvtn- 

Harbo- 

Rosen . 

Irmcy - 

Gesfty 

Mohr. 


Wioierrowd — 
Tele. Rootn 
Hollotnao — 

^zoo-. 

Miss Gsndy - 


Supervisor Dudley Payne called from the WFO 
\ at 11:30 a,m,. May 26. Be advised that Emanuel Blooh, 
attorney for the Rosenbergs, has filed a motion with 
the Clerk of the Supreme Court, asking for a stay 
in the Supreme Court* s action on the application 
a writ of certiorari which the Court denied on May 25. 
The stay is requested for a period of two weeks until 
an amended application for a writ of certiorari can 
'be filed. At this stage, the motion is in possession 
of the Clerk and probably will be presented 
Chief Justice Vinson some time this afternoon (May 26). 

ACTION: 

The WFO is following this closely and will 
keep the Bureau advised. 


CEHtLL 



‘lijU -i-i - 


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T 7' 


MAY 27 1953 


/ 


/ 

/ 



VTAHDARO 


V. 


HXU 


O^jtCC ^/LstTZOT C fVld/tlin • united sta^^s government 




TO t UR, LADD 


i»OM I A, H, 


SUBJECT 



DATE: May S2, 1953 


yf 


^LIUS ROSENBERG, ET AL 
ESPIONAGE - R, 




Tolsos 

Bci^C 

GUyia"* ^ 

Hsrbo 

Rosen ___ 

Tracy 

LaacbliB,^ 

Mohr 

Vimerrovd 

Tele. Rn. ^ 

HnllftiMft 

Gaixly 


I 


On the afternoon of May 22, 1953, I called 
Supervisor xom hcAndrews at New York to ascertain the 

handled States Attorney Irving Saypol 

ctenJ^L t ihe Rosenberg case. After 

opfni^a aduised me that Mr. Saypol made the 

opening statements; made the summary to the iurv and handled 
many of the witnesses during the trial. ^ ^ handled 


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-.i JUN 81953 




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May SSf 1953 


MonorabXa Mbrbart Mrownallj^f^ 
Attorhay OenaraJ 
Jhpartaant •/ Juattaa / 
Waahtngtaa, P* ■ 


■ u. 




O 


Pear Mr* Browielli 


Bei JuHua Boeenberg, eb al 
Saptenage • B 


In aecordanee »tth year auggeatien^ I have 
peruaed J^baabader Pillon*a telegram from Parta (Mo* 5972) 
to the Seeretaryt of State dated May 15^ XOSS^ in whioh 
Aabaeaador expreaaea hie view that the execution of the 
aentenee preaently pending againat Juliua and Sthel Boaenberg 
would /^avf a d«ltft 0 rfou 8 effect on Trench and Suropean opinion 
toward the United Statea* Be urgea that an appraiaal of 
the Soaenberjf aentenee be made in terma of the higher national 
inter eat* 




ri 



Apparently^ there ia no queati on that the majority 
of Trenoh opinion holds that the Roaenberga had a fair trial 
and are guilty of the chargee brought againat them* Ambaaaador 
Pillon ao atatea in hia telegram* fhia, of oourae, ia well 
known in the United Statea, aa the Roaenberga were afforded 
a trial by Jury in federal Court loitft the full protection of 
the demooratio prooeaaea of law in thia country* The 
Anbasaador expreaaea the opinion, however, that the death 
aentenee ia unjustifiable puniahment when compared with the . 
prison tema meted out to British aoientiata, Alan Munn May 
and Klaus Tucha* I would like to point out that any 
weakneaaea in the British security ay stem ahould not be 
utilised by thia country aa a basis for meting out Justice* 

The defendants in thia case have had resort, not only once 
but twice <8 the Supreme Court of the land* In addition, 
the do fendant a have applied for clemency to the trial Judge 
and tq the President of the United Statea, aa a result of 
whichr'the sentence haa been moat carefully reviewed and 
their' pleas for clemency denied*. 

Ambassador Pillon expreaaea the view that sentiment 


I 


S^JUNs 1953 


ABB: tic 


T* > 









rrVi^s// /to 





Honorable M^rb^rt ^rown^il 
Attorney Central * 0 


parental ai^tua o/ tAa Roaenbergy^ Xt iy perhapy ynlightyning 
that Ethyl Ryyynbyrg ra/uaatf ta aaa her mythyr fyr ahnyyt tmy 
yyyry fyllywing hyr yynviyttyn, and mhyn yhy /tnylXy did < 
aaa hyr mythyy^ yhy 5aao»a ifsfuriytyd with hyr aa aavaral - ^ - 
. aoaaalana nAaii uryai hyr mythyr ta fall anitll and ty 
think a/ har aMidran* 4 rallaMa aaurea odulaad that fiikaJ 
i?aaanfraFy bruyhyd a// fcar mythyr^y ranarlr ta think y/ ftar-- 
yhildryn by y taking, "Eyn^t mynttyn thy ohiZdryn, ChiXdryu ' 
ary byrn yvyry day in thy loyyk*" 

4 furthyr faotyr myntiynyd by Anbayyadyr DiXXyn iy 
thy /aaiXy oynnyytiyn with^ryynglayy vithyut vhyyy tyytinyny 
ohargyy eyuXd nyt havy byyn bryught hymyi" David Gryynglayy 
way an inpyrtant witnyyy in thy Eoyynbyrg trial* Eowyvyrf 
thyry wary additiynaX impyrtant witnyyyyy why ^brought ty light 
thy yypiynagy aotfvttfaa a/ Jultuy and Ethyl Syyynbyrg, yuoh 
ay Barry (hid. Max Eli tehyr, Euth Oryynglayy,- Ben Sohnyider, 
and ythyra* 

’T * • 

dnathar paint raiyed iy thy prytraoted dylayy 
which apparyntly ra/ara ta thy dylay In carrying cut aantanoa* 
These delayy are In no wiye the reeponyi bility of thy 
prosecution or thfy Gove7*7ment» They have resulted from the 
dilatory tactics of defense counsel and the seisurs by the 
defense of every conceivable means of forestalling yxsoutiou 
of thy sentynce* Thy fact of their ooaurranaa la but another 
indication of thy Judicial prooesyyy of thiy government 
which provide to a defendant every pessible naana to tecure 
Justice* 

Anbasyador Dillon refery to thy "lateyt doubty 
aroused as to reliability Greenglasy testimony by publication 
ytatement^^allygedly In Oreenglass handwriting»^hyyy 
authenticity not yet denied*** This refers to thy statement 
written by David Oreenglass at thy request of his attorney, 

0* John Boggy, shortly after the Initial interview by Agents 
of this Bureau subsequent to his arrest. Attorney Boggy 
requested Oreenglass ta furnish thy gist of the information 
which Greenglayy had given to fBI Agents* Thy details 
eonoerning thiy matter were furnished to Assistant Attorney 
Oyneral Olney by memorandum dated May I, 1959* Ay I point ad 


- SECRET 


2 


Honorable ff0rb§rt BrovntIJ. 
Attorney General ' ^ 


ottt fa Mr» GXney^ a 0o«por(«oi» a/ the afafenenf given 
by Greenglaaa fa hi$ aftarney 9ifk fha afatemenf dated 
June X6f IBSO^ nht oh ha gave fa aur Agenfo re/Xaofa na 
eubatanttaX oenf radio fiana* Subaequanf afaienenfo Jurniohad 
by OreangXaaOs nifh the eonaent of hi a aftarney, aef far fh 
full defaiXa af hie aefivifieo^ The featimany 0 / GraengX^oo 
at the trial oonatituted, af course, hie full reooXXeotian 
of his aotiuities and those af the defendants. 

Ambassador PiXXan stated that a •tt5«tanifa2 aagnent 
af Freneh apinion also nahes a distinetion between the degree 
of guilt of Bosenberg at the principal and that af his eife 
as on aocessory. At the record af the trial mil reflect, 

Ethel Bosenberg actively assisted Julius Saaenberg in hio 
espionage aotfvfiftt* 

With reference to the apinion af the Ambassador 
that the great majority of French people feel the 

death sentence is unjustified from a moral standpoint and 
is due only to the political climate peculiar ta the United 
States, now and at the time of the trial, as pointed out 
above, I feel that we should take cognisance of the fact that 
the defendants have had every opportunity of appeal and that 
the Supreme Court has twice considered their ease. In 
addition, public opinion in this country, as expressed by 
editorial oomnon’l in our newspapers, I tninh it can be fairly 
said, has been overwhelmingly in favor of the sentence metad 
out to the defendants* 

Relative to Ambassador Dillan*s comments regarding 
Ur* Cohn, it should be considered that former United States 
Attorney Irving Saypol, not Ur, Cohn, was fn direct charge 
of the prosecution of this case* Ur, Saypol is now a Hew 
York State Supreme Court Justice, Ur* Cohn did assist 
materially in the prosecution, but the responsibility for the 
handling of the case and the majority of the prosecution 
itself were charged to Ur* Saypol* 

In weighing the reaction to this matter, the 
current attitude of the Communist Party, both here and abroad, 
should be taken into consideration* Communist Parties, both 
in the United States and abroad, have been conducting a prolific 





Sonorabl0 JGRrrdtfri Broanell.^V^ 
Att9rn0y G€n§rQl . 



campaign through the Comnuntet prc$$ and /rent crganiMattcnd 
demanding the amelioration e/ the Moeenberge* eentenee» ^ 
Indeed, among many of the argunente advanced have been \ - 
come of theae act forth in Jnbaaaador JHllon'a telegram^ 


A reduction in aontenoe mould, of courec, be 
interpreted by the Communiata aa a deoiaioe victory reaulting 
from the very vigoroua campaign which they are waging toward 
thte end. Commutation Itkewtae could be conatrued ae a aign 
of weakneaa and indeeiaion on the part of thie Covernnent 
in protecting the aecurity of the Cnited Statee* The effeat 
of thia aentence ae on object leeaon to other enemie a cr 
potential enemiea threatening our aecurity, of courae, would 
be loat in the event the aentence of the Boaenberga were 
reduced* 


While the Ambaaoador ia undoubtedly aineere in 
hi a eepreaaion of opinion aa to the grave conaequencea t^ich 
may enaue if thia aentence ia carried out, it i a my opinion 
that the contrary may well be true. If the aentence ia 
reduced, we may well be charged, not only abroad but ia thia 
country, with knuckling under to Conmuniat preaaure and thia 
could not help but be extremely harmful to pur national 
aecurity* 

I oo returning to you Ambaaoador JHllon^a telegram 
and accompanying document* 




Respectfully, 


• 4 • 


Eneloaure 


4-750 (Rev. 4-17-85) 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 


□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 



0 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 




FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
FOlPA DELETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET 


Page(8) withheld entirely at this location in the Hie. One or more of the following statements, where 
indicated, explain this deletion. 


Deleted under exemption(s) with no segregable 

material available for release to you. 


Information pertained only to a third party with no reference to you or the subject of your request. 


Information pertained only to a third party. Your name is listed in the title only. 

Documents originated with another Government agency(ies). These documents were referred to that 
agency(ies) for review and direct response to you. 


Pages contain information furnished by another Government agency(ies). You will be advised by the FBI as 
to the releasability of this information following our consultation with the other agency(ies). 


Page(s) withheld for the following reasonCs): 


* 

For your information: 






The following number is to be used for reference regarding these pages: 

IjS": i ^ <^3 (y ~7 (/ 0 ULA. 




xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

X DELETED PAGE(S) X 
X NO DUPLICATION FEE x 
X FOR THIS PAGE X 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 


FBI/DOJ 



TO I 

noM t 





MR. A. H. 9E. 


m. W. V, CLE7ELAN. 



(DBJBCT: JULIU^ ROSENBERG 

ETHEL ROSENBERG 
ESPIONAGE - R 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 



DATE: 


May 26 y 1953 





Tolsoo 
B^moat — ~ 


Clew 

GUvin-a 


Haibo — - 

Roscfl 

Tracy - 

Geafty - ■ 

Mohr 

Vtacerrowd 
Tele. Roo« 
Hollomao — 

Sisoo-^ 

Miss Gaady 


In connection with the motion filed with the 
Clerk of the Supreme Court by Emanuel Bloch, attorney for the 
Roaenberga, aaking for a atay in the Supreme Court'a action 
on the application for a writ of certiorari, which the Court 
denied on May 25, 1953, Supervisor Dudley Payne of the IFO y y 
Maduised at 1:50 P3I, that the Government is expected to file — ^ 
an answer to the motion this afternoon* Thereafter it is 
expected that a decision will be rendered by the Court on 
May 27, 1953, 


/ 

i 


ACTION: 


The l.FO is following this matter closely and will 
keep the Bureau advised. 



1 



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Hi,',';:N IS Uhli.^isi/ISD •'•’'•. 
■' X;!: .z±4/'i<L _. : 




A; 


May 2 , 1953 


# # 

3 A Of H 9 m York 

Director , T^l 

MARTHA i:OLF, utc,, 

Mart Ka Zi 'am e r na a 
SKCtiR/TI MATTi R - C 


lolaM 

U(U- 


Nic%ols . 
Belmi 
CUm - 
Glmvim — 
Hmrbp^ 
Ko»c« — 


Tr*cv 

Geanv 


Ttle. 

llctloMa ~ 
Sizoo ■ ■ 


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i i 


Th6 FiiT€(xu is T€03i^i^ of 0/1 ononj//iiou5 u/i(Jot^(i 
letter rost^rhed i'a... lS\ 1953, York, 

whic'-: contains '^hs following siessage: 

"Cftn tlene -i : 

"7 rves t i.c a te a former neighbor of the 
F.o?enhergs Martha <iolf, formerly of 
A’: i ck er tr> ck er Fiilace Monroe it. 
liv in I'e'iroit • ,<65 i iwmtrm- /i • 


I’-e r-’iirt. of SA iilgiir C. format dated June J, 
1,L-:, l.ea,'rari er.utUd "Theodtrc deorge 
nea^ore Sevrgt Internal Secvrity - 

7o:— ‘j'PJCo. refleota that Martha Half, nee M^rtnc 
'z'i^~->err.a''i ,reo i led in A-rjartment AC 12, kO Monroe Street, 

^ew York City, The regorz /urt'-zr reflects ^ 

l9'iF. c confidential informant found a card at the East Si 

0 ^ the Co'^muniRt Party, 5 Hutgera Street, hew York City, 
indicating memberehia in the Communist Forty which contained 
the r.a‘ae o* Martha '*olf, AC 12, LO Monroe street, Hew York 

Citu. -■ ' 


— # 


The Hsu) York C.fpice should search office files 
for j’ii. ad ditional p^.rtin-jnv suhuersiue and 
inforvia-tlor. identifiable with iJartha »olf and furnish ^he 
inform It lon to t'-e Detroit 'Office, 

The Vetreit Office, upon receipt of information 
from Sew York ,r,hoi.ld search office files for any 
identirxcile information cone erninr Martha kolf ani thereafter 
be guided b _■ qur rant ^liureiiir''instru ct ions gouerning security 

cases , 


2 00 


V--: 


- Detroit ':f ' ' : 





MAStlO ~ ^ 

MAY 2 7 1953 


( 


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fMK1402lANDUJ2 VOR USi. TCLSON 

U*J>D 

Mfv. BSLMoi-rr 


Tiidaf at Aitorocy CJewsral'a Itmcbeoa, a d£ac&R»loa 
aroi)« ^:o»c«raiB3 Wr. Banlsy Cvusn s’ luv is ap|w?arlns aa ccMinaal In sosce 
ca9Q irt the Court of Claims. I advised tha Atrorntiy Geaeral that r«c<riuly 
Mr. Ctbxc had »®cb 0t to 01^^ thi-s Bureaa a atatomoot concaratus li!a 
cezsu^cUons a»d asaociaLioB;) v^ ith allegedly subTcraiva front organ! ratioaa. 

1 w >nld lihe to h.%vc ft copy of thia ataicment xranoiRitted lo the Attoraay 
G^'sora.t for Klf Ixtforioatioa. 

Thaw aroie at >.bc luncheon coday a disco«»ion ccac® ra- 
in^ the i.av<>yi'r» Gttild. Ii aa'i inJi .-aced .hat this or^anlstacioa will shortly 
be placed upon 'b? lia: of «aJyi'<.'rs*iv« orcanittal’i’rins by th* AtJerney O naral. 
Ittctdcn; to -h e. th; ejuve^:. jr, aTt>:^c aa to vKat enf tpViVS oi cUjr o.r^ajvisacioa 
mlgh- in the Dr;pa.r:r.^oo- -4 Justice. rh?re discuased the d-J-sirabUily 
of l 3 5 u.'ii 5 to all iMaployees of rhe Ocpar^nr.eai a quaiitionoaire for ihfsn to Ii»t 
^h<> names ';£ all 'OJfjjaniaa' ions >? • hlch ihcy nc-w b.'iung« 

# 

I buivff i.ske<: Mr. ipau^lujk oI rJu* Dw-m«3t.'c ItttalUjfcnce 
Division t’> l<?t Baa kaou v^'Kcilier v a inoinovr^Uip r*jii of iS» 

Guild and if bc/ recoTii i3. i have aL» : zn^iUir^d of Mir. iMrighi-M, co 

t&iS Hav^ tw all inlorm^tian vjhick 

’ari: h6.v»> la our f:lo 4 ? upc-a Otuld 4:5 -bat tkc Dcp-irtsa^nt nvay have 

arailabU compute? lnJo*wavU>ti M.birh TDI has upon «» .<>rgaad?»iatiMa 
in cona'diTlirs il on th^ subv -raive li«t ot erganiaatiens. 

A disc U 3 :m>jR. a/o^ ^ as the for:hcomtng r-xccu^i*'n of 
hv-', ond i ’ud^caii'd that th« Court today had Be'. we^k cf Jun« 15 

' for i-he exccvi i->n, -vtih a likclih'- iha‘ i; ^t^uld take place cn Jirae 18% j^Ujch 
\o i-Hc day v/hen t?xc» u*iony ar^- t:arried ou: at Sing Sing* ve'hcre the iXiij3e»b'^rg< 
Ln(^ — inrarc^eratf^d. » ha A;:orncy Gcnjral c:a'4d vha: Mr. Jcrn<,^ti» Dimeter of 
Beiffiofii ^ was prof coding kO Y^rk vc v/tirh c>u.t •ha dtrvails ior ^hiB cjrj^iixtlon 

Gtaviii — a<id vras to con* AC'* the Ro^^anhi! rrjt> aea if ''hrty tild be v^?sU.t)g tc fnaK? any 

Ro»c«_..^ 4 it^»i 3 fveni ?5 co.Tkc^rninji ‘h'/ir at^aocla* tone axhl accivitia^i in capl^najlc* 1 int;uirc*d 


. r®cy - 

G«»rty , — :^he A ; i o rn cy O « iv 

Mohr * 

Viotrrrowd 
T?l<. Roo-w* 

))ollom«Q . . 

Si £00 ^ ^ 

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b*-imctJ WAS going co tnakc any 



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4o in cat** »JwuM Vs 's^iJURi ^ »4fci4 

tShat ftfft Vc dniic Vy Mx- Scniwit. I tafci tl»* Att<Mrticy 

0^»»X rfw«14 J»v« i»iRSlnd proper 9r.>t«^iT»* for tHc iaJ^rvfowlnz 4i the 

fias^soheW ehwiSA they 4e«i4» to irAke wry ^i1.*r »»•> or *t ^ 

UxRo vht*slSf before their eaeceifoR li the Freaidtmt doer net coworete tiwr 
eenteiice. vb&<d» It new «e<^tsrs« wSlK^sly <>hav 3u* ^ili do. 


The AUemey Oes'jerel asdvircd -^rt Mr. ^UenPnUee had tefotiiafted 
him there wee e very Udere&ting film »?h5ch tad bean prftjajred by ClA^ea the 
e£ Brain Wastj^^g^' aed i# r. wfi'* d«?I*':Kzf o« to 

the 3in«st»Vcr4 R:t*irviirtj 'Va /; uorTK'v Ctretra?*® lvw.h--i»ci *! s^nnn vixi(s<e 
in An Tis^T £%nttrt». fe wcg* egri>ed ifcttt iUia '&'"'uld he shc-wa eajstaetlai-s (tiring 
the eecond «r.e««h at 1«R», pr<vtab*y o» e ^.'edfc-seday •:>«' *5 her^day aficrnwn. 

The Aitttfsvjy CtwvsiTSkX itvdit-nied ihat h'- *t:rt:dAf»re at :«ic l«a-.V?aa 

hrtnd '■* tth iteift per>. as ft* tVpy vvviid V? •nt^'r^siod i» e^-^iag 

this iriea. 1 b<tWo‘v^ ix vr<i>.'i1d V-; . fo r M». r *d-a end Mt*. Eylraon? vo 

ettsad -S» tStii* fitra. ?- «vjn plsuints»ij ic au ‘»*t it snyf-tif and as ftoi* 

ee 1 t ve fVv *s>iart f.Jrn* f-SKi v^lac* t -r *.t -f x^-dyieft a';’r€'>»d.»c^^y. 


Th« Auonny a»;»tfral ia<?«iro4 e£ t»ss <«»tc«yRiag V.aiu-r 
aitti whai his as«t^ci%:U*nA. miyh'i hr fo iir^aftUi>tJi>si. T it.d^^j>r..d 

Auovt -i/ C«eiK.*re.l s' t tnK *r > Mb v*«i^h J t-’id 

3ecr< <sry i£<* 'i KuixcyMi-^y, 5«urrti#try Daritin, G«i-»’>raJ- v,n-l !■* 

S<r/efftl .-.‘CfacUki? i3 ?h.'» ’ rr^fsxirf i;f--oi“.rrr •.<*», a-v w.‘ll aft tha ‘V'-^cru '/ •■ia:'^rai. 
wbc» He -j^-afossrsd Ag--.-. a •;^oQf^«in54 i-J It had 

he-an v\ 4 »;i 4 jr 4 }lat)ul n 'uChat. '•'Id? i j-iVtshitJ it--* , Co7t-.»y 

Qfttrsal** y%;«?iSW«iiwa. I caliv'd ft? ,»uc;t'tvr'y G- C'Bi vo 

auMtOxT'ntt .tt with Ony rh?M.<4^ «t Jr., v-h^nr hr d’-pTwlet ojK-yi Kineid itcaWy 

and v.-iio v.rki invi'>'- <^r Ua^- a fMlc.ly s*vt£i fo* Siiar>. - hac%«vcund rath«r 

eA«*v,4r/. J w.>*.iJ'J liV.' fo- 1vi.v« *. is»ettv?fa3'haf. yn-ajja^-ed tor -he Attorney ^ 

G-^niAral -va .’<«■• hss- attd al;it> oa »<«n». v.hi at tlxM yr.i4<;rw vima ?£ oi «,-. .ralhvr a 
<;t>ac iat-Ms aii4 Itae b 4 ^en ncAjdag bryadeest?-. la Oevroii. mgr the* wMa copies 

ui the ♦icsrroepiSndonce >arhlch Ueuiher wrot^ i-o percoa^i i« ii«ft -cuuntry when h« 

'tfZAt In iiasyja* 



'bixSdi'^x-t 'o Jhs iLa vy ira trsav’^i , i disf vrivn er:»»« c'mx- 

corsvTia /.’? ^tc-s^c" Vianet J-m "I VaIi; UrSv^'raJiy %«jd t hri^-Uy t-uOw d hU 
ar=-mtwi stw-d sir t'.videe. t js^-lutrtd .m' *a: *.'■. fo*d ItorH valht* to -hi* 

dsne >. . Mv..> . :aMra >4 «al3..a Vb/os.. «.iiry ir4-.t>s» cA -Tiiugroes lo^oftute c4 :ha 

W-. hl» t>y r'.’nat-..;- : sT* hV- Is -.r '<Uj.» ol Vr-i--..: s.* y* 

1,'irlvAryi;/. I iftliceicd ".:• -Uo A^., .Mttey Ci^a-riJ i.Kv . hr li-xiiQ t^>*rvtr.iUve 


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^ #ic V«c»v.5c a: tfca Cfi tius SeMut®- 

- . K^%d Kai>Pw*l9J£<i .;s.. 

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Jlito th^ «»o».r U «:5f T-"*'- ■'^o ‘“- «t<.r«. i»<S ■J>' ■'‘‘^‘ ^'■' '«’* 

T: uc r--.? “r„.;.-,;;,«^. -.in r..«r. K «<> jf a---'*; 

Uu.»a«. !»y «- -. « =0... .B i* ■:. B«->vv.d I ‘->-- 

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Office MefMrandum 



tUBjBcr; JULIUS jROSENBERG 

ETHEL mOSENBERG 
ESPIONAGE - R 


• UNITED #ATEo 


DATB: 



GOVERNMENT 

y 

I 

Tolsoo 

June 1, 1953 


GUTio.. 

Harbo 

Roscft_ 

Tracy ■■ 

Gcaity 

Mohr 

Wiotenwd^ 
Tele. Rom.- 

HoUoms 

Sine 

Mias Geedy .. 





Stipe rvisor Scoi't Miller called from New York 
at 3:45 today, June J. He stated that Judge Kaufman 

had Just denied a motion for reduction of sentence and 
a motion for stay of execution. In connection with the 
denial of these motions, Emanual Bloch, the attorney for 
the Rosenbergs, indicated he would appeal within 24 
hours to the Circuit Court of Appeals, 


Bloch was asked by the U, S, Attorney whether 
he planned filing additional motions, and Bloch said 
he planned to file a motion under Rule 2265, on the basis 
of newly-^discovered evidence, some of which was Just 
learned yesterday. May 31, (This apparently pertains 
• •to o statement made yesterday by Bernard Greenglass to 
the effect David Greenglass had told him that he had 
..stolen uranium,) 

i' 

ACTION: 


For your information. 

The NYO will keep the Bureau advised of 
developments. 


y. ^ 

CEHtLL 


oc-MR, NICHOLS 


, T rr'- 










s.' ' 





laftc I* l9iS 


MEMORANDUM FOR MR. TOLSON 

MR. LADD 
MR. NICHOLS 


I called Mr. Ladd with rtfaraact lo a mattar which 
had been dUcaasad today at tha Attorney Caaaral'a liuchcoa. 

X told Mr. Ladd that almost ovary day at these loacheoas tha 
Rosenberg Casa comas op for discosslon and I would like to have 
a memorandum prepared to the Attorney General setting forth 
exactly what the latest move is that Block intends to lake, what 
it is predicated upon and what is our answer to iL 1 commented 
this was the statement that Block got from an Individual by the 
name of Greenglass. 




1 also told Mr. Ladd that each day by 11:00 o’clock 
I would like to have for review, before going to the Attorney 
Ceneral*s lancheoa« any new develofuaents in the Rosenberg Case 
in view of the closeness of Uxe execution date. 


3 


Isoo 

i fid 

chols 

etmoni 



Glavia 

Harbo 

Roseo 

Tracy 

Gearty — 

Mohr 

rinterrowd .. 
Tele. Roo.n . 
Mono-nao 

Si 7C0 — 

Mies G-mdy - 


k 


7 


ALli c r t 

uirWi^TM Ib 


Very truly youra« 

j • a, I -I 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


herein is, ^ 


MTE. 


J£H:£H 




<>E' 



SS^ 


.H 



is SF2 2(.- f (e L 


r . » ; 


^ 


OF THB DIRECTOR 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR i ) 

Re; Rosenberg Case 


WASHINGTON IS. O. C. 

May 27, 1953 


Mr. Tolsoo 
Mr. Ladd — — 
Mr. Nichols^— 
Mr. 'u«tinoac->— 

Mr. Clegg 

Mr. Glavio — 
Mr. Harbo 
Mr. Rosea — 
Mr. Tracjr - - 

Mr. Gearty 

Mr. Mohr 

Ur. Vioterrowd- 

Tele. Room 

Ur. Hollonao — 

Mr. Sia>o 

Mias Gandy — 


Mr. Metzner in the Department brought to my office this 
aiternoon a cover note from Mr. Bernard M. Shanley of the White House, with 
which Mr. Shanley submitted to the Attorney General two handwritten letters 
purportedly written by the Rosenberg children. One of the letters is signed 
^'Michael Rosenberg" and petitions the release of his mother and father, using 
as a basis for his request the release of William Oatis. The other letter is 
signed "Michael and Robert Rosenberg" and also petitions the release of the 
Rosenbergs. In the first letter Michael Rosenberg refers to his brother Robert 
as being six years old; therefore, it would appear that, if they are authentic, 
both letters were written by Michael. Mr. Metzner stated that the Attorney 
General desired a handwriting comparison made to determine if both letters 
were written by the same person. 


I delivered the notes immediately to Mr. Parsons in the Labora- 
tory, with the request that a handwriting examination be made on a most expedite 
basis and a report be prepared for Mr. Metzner. 


Mr. Metzner advised that it was the Attorney General's view that 
nothing further be done on these letters, especially if it was determined both 
were written by the same person. He would appreciate your views, however, 
as to whether or not you feel any further steps should be taken with reference to 
these letters. The thought occurs that in the event the letters are found to be 
written by different persons, some consideration might be given to obtaining 
known handwriting specimens on a discreet basis from the records of the school 
attended by Michael Rosenberg in order to determine whether or not he wrote 
either of the letters. Michael Allen was born 3-10-43; Robert Harry born l0-14-!»47-. 

Mr. Metzner asked that the letters be returned to him tomorrow / 
in order that he can return them to the White House. 


cc - Mr. Ladd 
Mr. Harbo 

JAS:eff 


7 -JV. 


Respectfully 

B£C0HDE()-57 

J. A, ISizoo 





11 1,1 ii ...I.... / 


,3 JWN 




COPY 



The White House 
Washington 


May 25, 1953 


MEMORANDUM TO: 

The Honorable Herbert Brownell 
The Attorney General 


Herewith are two letters - one presumably 
from both of the Rosenberg childrens, and 
the second, which recently came in, from 
Michael Rosenberg. 

1 don't know whether or not you wish to 
turn them over to the FBI, but 1 did think 
you would be interested in seeing them. 

Would you recommend a reply? 


Bernard M. Shanley 
Special Counsel to the President 


Ends 
per above 


r' 


7 - .av'* 




COPY 


j t/- f 



ENCLOSUh^ 


Dear Mr. President, 


Please don't leave my brother and I without a Mommy and 

Daddy. 

They have alwas been good to us. We love them very 

much. 


Michael and Robert Rosenberg 

36 Laurel Hill Terrace 
New York, N. Y. 


itc :{c 3{c 4c # :{c ijc ]{C 4e :{( i^c ^ 4( ;(c # :tc ^ :{c 9{e :4 e :{c 

5/21 

c/o B. Bach 
Rte. 2 Box 148 M 
Toms River, New Jersey 
PM 5/20/53 

Dear President Eisenhower, 

I saw on telivision on monday, Mr. Oatis is not in jail 
in Europe any more because the President of the country let him go. 

It said his wife wrote a letter to the President over there and she told 
why Mr. Oatis should be let go. I think it is a good thing to let him 
go home because I know prison is a very bad place for anybody to be 

My momy and dady are in prison in New York My brother 
is six years old His name is Robby. He misses them very much. I 
miss them too. I got the idea to write to you from Mr. Oatis on telivision. 
Please let my mommy and daddy go, and not let anything happen to them. 

If they come home Robby and I will be very happy. We will thank you 
very much. 

Very truly yours, 

Michael Rosenberg 


4c 4c 9ic4c 4c 4c 4c 4c 4: 4c 4: 4: 4c 3ic 4c 4c >Sc 4c 4e ^ 4c 4c )tc4c 


COPY eff 










< 






Ur* Chari ee M* Uetanar Uay Sdt 1953 

Executtva 'to 'tfto A't'tomay Osneral 


Dirac torp TBI 

o 

uichak:. nos;:fiDERO 


Sandwrijtan Coupari aon Q 


Befaranca ia aacia to tta two le tiara which yau 
dalixtarai to ny •ffiea a« May 27, 1953, raporUdly writtaa 
to tha Praaidant by tha Boaenbarg ehildran* 


An exaalaatloH in our Laboratory ohewa that tfco 
bodies of theaa lattara cod tfto writing oa the ent»eJoj>w 
of tha UlCBACL ftOSEMBEBC latter were written by one pawn* 
The addreae appearing at the bottom of tha latter aigned 
UICEAEL AJfD ROBUiT ROSEMBERd, all Of the writing on the 
envelope attached to it, and the notation written with 
blue pencil at the top of the letter aigned MICHAEL 
ROSEBBERG ware not written by the aama parson who wrote 
the bodies of the two letters* 


In view of the fact that both lettere were 
written by one parson, no further action ^e being taken 
unleaa ragueatad* 


fha two anvalopaa and lettere are ancloaad* 


/ I 


Encloaura 


GWD:UEG 

65-58236 

> 

/ 



.Ari>.’ ,:W. iEiSi*- • 

■7/'^ J 


■x^7.-r ‘-vs. 







Ojfice TS/istjm jndum. 


• UNITED S 1 *.J*ES GOVERNMENT 


TO I JC?. it* E* BSLMi 


moM t 


fXJBJBCT: 




MR. C. E. HEN N RICE 

0 r 

JULIUS ROSENBERG 
ETHEL^ ROSENBERG 
ESPIONAGE - R 




Tolscm 




DATE: May ESf 

» Bel^ot — 


/ 


Bel^t 

Clew 

GUvio— 

Harbo 

Rosen — 

Tfscy 

Gesny 

Mohr 

Wioterrowd - 
Tele* Roons 
Hollomsa — 

Si too 

Mim Gsa<ly 


Supervisor T. Seofb Miller called from New fork 
ot 11-20 o.».. May 28* Ee advised thot the order denying 
certiorari for the Rosenbergs had been reoe ived . 

Circuit Court of Appeals in New Torh this morning (5/26). 

The order vacating the stay of execution has 
not been received by the Circuit Court of Appeals; homver, 
the Clerk of the Circuit Court has talked with 
t^rl Vr the kpreme Court, e>ho hue aduteed that tfc* order 
uaclttZ t^e T^y ha, beea‘ etgned ty the 
U on tts way to the Ctroutt court. *«««'' *'** 
Clerk of the Circuit Court filed the mandate with the 

District Court. 

AUSA Kilsheimer will go before Judge Kaufman 
on May 29, 1953, and ask that a specific date be set 
for the execution of the Rosenbergs. 


ACTION: 


For your information. 


The NTO has been instructed to keep the Bureau 
promptly advised of developnentSm 


CEEtLL 

cc-MR. NICHOLS 



: .....LJ .recorded* 114 

4 % ' 

y. 7'J Y:S^ . 


J^\uJ V • * V — 










OKAL BUrEAU Of INVESTIGAriCN 
t*. S. DEPAfirMEiNT OF JUSTICE 

CfiM.-iuSiCATiOl'iS SECTION 



) 


Mr. Lr::.:. 





YPE 



IRECTOR 


0 


FROM NEW YORK 
URGENT 


20 1?^17 PM 







. ■ I 

r. - 

Mr, 

Mr. V.. z] ! 

Mr. I... .1 ! 

Mr. 

Mr. C 

Ml. Iv;. i;l 

Mr. AV r.:- rro\vd_. 

Tele. K'jt ni 

i Obnian 

Sizro 

riiss Guiidy 




JULIUS ROSENBERG, ESP R, BUREAU-S ATTENTION IS DIRECTED TO NY TELS 
REFERRING TO INTERVIEWS WITH THE PASSPORT PHOTOGRAPHER BEN SCHNEIDER 
AND IN PARTICULAR TO THE UNKNOWN MAN WHO VISITED SCHNEIDER-S SHOP 
AND HAD PASSPORT PHOTOS TAKEN AND LATER QUESTIONED SCHNEIDER ABOUT 
TAKING THE ROSENBERG PICTURES. IT IS NOTED THAT SCHNEIDER LOCATED 
THE NEGATIVE OF THIS MAN AND COPIES OF THE SAME WERE MADE AND HAVE 
BEEN DISTRIBUTED TO NY INFORMANTS. THE PHOTO OF THIS MAN WAS EXHIBITED 
TC NORMA ABRAMS, REPORTER OF THE QUOTE NY DAILY NEWS UNQUOTE, AND SHE 
IDENTIFIED IT AS A PHOTO OF WILLIAM ADDISON PRICE, REPORTER FOR THE 
QUOTE NY DAILY NEWS UNQUOTE. IT IS NOTED THAT PRICE IS THE SUBJ OF 
SM DASH C NY FILE ONE ZERO ZERO DASH ONE ZERO NINE SEVEN SEVEN FOUR, 

I 

BUFILE ONE ZERO ZERO DASH THREE NINE EIGHT ONE SEVEN FIVE. IT IS NOTED 
/THAT BUREAU HAS BEEN PREVIOUSLY ADVISED IN PRICE-S CASE THAT HE HAD 
.BEEN ACTIVE ON BEHALF OF THE COMMITTEE FOR THE ROSENBERGS. IT IS ALSO 
NOTED THAT IN PRiCE-S CASE IT HAS BEEN SUGGESTED TO THE BUREAU THAT 
SOURCES ABROAD BE ALERTED TO THE ACTIVITY OF PRICE, WHO IS NOW ABROAD. 




IN CONNECTION WITH ROSENBERG COMMITTEE. 


C J 
^ / 


IT IS SUGGESTED BUREAU CONSIDER ADVISING SOURCES OF PRICE-S ACTIVITIES 

, /07 

- ^ - ,^53 j (I lf-> 

v.r; 2fi ■ I 

KNV R 21 WA DP >0 f' ' ' 

c\ B.ISC ' 

f>SjUN9 t!K3> 





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E«ANUtt BLOCK BILL WOVE IN THE SUHKEWE COUHT ON THE TVENT 
fO* A STAY PENDING AN APPLICATION FO* A RE-HEAHING. THIS 
» STAY HILL BE SUBMITTED TO CHIEF JUSTICE VINSON. IF STAY IS DENIE 

SUPREME COURT ORDER DIENING CERT HILL PROBABLY COME ' 

thentyseventh next, hash fld office hill ADVISE 

‘INI ■ 


VINSON DECISION IN THIS MATTER. RECORDED* 

BOARDMAN '* jjp 

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( 


Assistant Attorney General 
warren Olney IT I 


Uay 23, 19S3 


Director, FBI 

-0 

JULIUS ROSSUBKRa, etOl 
SSFIOMAGE •R 


Attached for your tnromatton are Photostats 
of the following articles which haue appeared in the 
"Daily Worker," east coast Coinmunist newspaper, oon^ 
corning the cboje^captioned caset 


2* Article entitled, "New Greenglass Letter 
Bares Nis Lies Against Rosenborgs," appearing in the 
uay 4 , 1953, issue* 

2* Article entitled, "The Greenglass Documents 
Analysed," appearing in the Uay 6, 1953, issue* 

3* Article entitled, "The Greenglass Documents • 2," 
appearing in the Uay 7, 195^, issue* 

4* /rticle entitled, "New K’idence Bareo Trutneup 
of fiosenbcrgs," appearing in the Uay 10, 1953, isoj-e* 



\ 

'^.JToltoa 

Lsdd 

Ntebols 

Bciwoat . — 

Cle„ 

CUvio 

tiarbo 

Rose* 

Tmqr 

Gesny 

Mohr 

Riaterrowd 

Tele. Room _ 

itotlonaa 

St«K> 

Miss C%ady 




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MAY 2 6 

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By MILTON HOWARD 

s ownjnemory, and that as a result his teslony, on which Ae ^sSr^“ °”'P 'M 


i\l 


T T 

!_• LI 


mony. 1 his sensational development in the worl 
fajnous case took place yesterday afternoon at th 
cL:mency-for-Rosenbergs rally held at Randalls Is, 
land, New York City. The U.S. Supreme Court 
may hand down its decision today on the Rosen- 
berg appeal for a new trial. 

The damning Greenglass document, wr-tose au- 
thenticity has been established by Elizabeth Mc- 
Carthy, a nationally kno\yn handwriting expert, 

6rst appeared in the anti-Communist French paper. 

Combat, in Paris. It was made available to the American 
public yesterday after having created a sensation in France 
tliroiigh its pubhcation also in die leading French consen^a- 
tive paper, Le Monde. 

MAJOR POINTS 

The Greenglass document confirms these major points in 
the charge that Greenglass lied on the witness stand with 
the connivance and knowledge of the FBI: p 

1— He told the court and the jury that he told Ha iry 
Cold, another witness, to c-ome back to see liim alxiut alleged 
a^om information. Actually, it was the FBI that told liim 
to say that. . " Lj ^ 

EMCLDSURfi 


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I i witness in tne 



2— He did not say at first that he had met a Russian. 

meeting wim die FBI, he made a firm i dentifica- 
tion of ihis Russian as Yakovlev in the Soviet embassy. 

3— He allowed the FBI to place into his “confession* 
thin^ of which he himself had no recollection. 

4— He described in detail in hlarch, 1951, during the 
trial a conversation of which he had no real recollecdon in 
June, 1950, when the FBI was questioning him. 

5— He lied when he told the jurj' that Julius Rosenberg 

had sent Harry Gold to see him, since he did not know Gold 
nihe months before when this meeting was alleged to have 
taken place. • 


Ntt onb b Oiis tfa« language of 
a p^^urer,' but it is tha absolnto 

op 



AFTER CITING a document in which Greenglass' wife> 
Rudi, shows that her husband was hysterical, unbalancedg 
given to fanasties and lies, chairman of the Rosenberg com* 
mittee, Joseph Brainin told the rally audience: ^ 

"Tn the light of this description, w'hat shall we ^ake 
of a second document published on April 18 by Le Coipibat, 
a French newspaper, and reprinted in Le Monde, thenvell* 
known newspaper, a document which purports to be written 
in Greenglass^ own handwriting, , I repeat. Le Combat, 
a Parisian anti-Communist daily, published a statement by 
David Greenglass in his own handwriting. I wish you could 
see this man s handwriting. It is that on ^an immature cl^ild. 
The document starts out by saying: 

*^Tliese are my approximate statements to the FBI.** 
*'And what are these statements? 

^Greenglass says that he told the FBI that he met 
Harry Cold in New Mexico, smd now listen carefully to this: 
"They (FBI) told me that I had told him to come back later, 
I didn^t rememb«r this but I allowed it in the statement.*^ 
"Let us pause for a moment, for this statement by 
David Greenglass gives us they key to his subsequent tes- 
timony at the trial.'' 

i "The FBI told him something he. didn’t rcmember,j!yet 

53^- _ If 

ni\ readily agreed to accept it as his own statement. j 
^ T.et me read further what Greenglass writes: | 

*( told them (FBI) that on a visit to me in 1944 my wife; 
asked me to give information/ - j 

"AikI following that, in the language of a man w^ho is’ 
carefully investigating a story, Greenglass writes: T made 
sure to tell the FBI that she was transmitting this informa- 
tion from my brother-in-law Juh’us/ 

‘Ts this the language of a man telling the truth, or of a 
man creating a story, a fiction? 


like of wbat Greeikj^ass testi- 
fied w court! 

_ “At the trial he placed bis wife 
^ the room, contrary to what be 
* in htf handwritten statement, 

I bemuse the prosecution needed 
coiroboration. And when be and 
the prosecution needed corrobora- 
‘ifion at the trial, the truth goes 
out the window. 

“At the trial Greenglass said that 
Julius Rosenberg sent Gold to blin, 
the very opposite of what be says 
here in the statement, 

. “In his own handwritmfit Green- 
glass says he told the FBI ol a 
meeting with a stranger in mkl- 
town Manhattan. He cannot ze- 
member who this man is. By die 
time the trial begins, his memory 
is considetably improved to the 
point where this stranger acquires 
la nationality — aiid, strangely 
lenough, it is a Russian. Are all 
; these matters— not knowing who 
sent Gold, not knowing who the 
strati I er was, not remembering 
what ^ they talked about, not re- 
in emqjering the details of Gold’s 
visit to New Mexico— are aU these 
iinatters to be summed up in 
jOreenglass* statement in his own 
hand witting that: *I didn’t remem- 
ber this, but I allowed it in the 
statement. 


in Folc)' Square contradicts W 
bo told the jury which sent f 
Rosenborgs to their death. 

The desoription of Creengp* 
charaefaff given by his wife M . 
investig^tm^ was read by Jose^ 
Brainin' as foDows: 

“As to her husband, she stat o 
that he had a tendmey to hyster 
At other tinfiH he would beco- t 
delirioiUs and once, when he h 
the grippe, he ran nude throi> 
the hallway shrieking of 
phants/ *lead pants.* . . She ) 
known him since she was 10 ye 
old. She said that he . would i 
things were so even if they w 
not He talked of suicide as if 
were a character iti the moy 
but she didn’t tliink he would 
if 

HANOWRITI.NG CHECKED 

The auUienticity of the ' Cre^ f 
glass statement is unquesdonf 
His handwriting was checked 
the handwriting expert against p 
writing on his marriage certifiqi 
a physician’s statement, a c4^ 
ficate of partnership, and on 
Cerificate of Conducting Busin 
on file in New York. 

The expert stated: “There 
I such unique and remarkable s 
ilarities belw'een questioned a 
standard wTiting in all of the i 
porant, underlying uncoDSci< 
writing characteristics that I c - 


“And in this summary in Grccn-lcome to no otlier conclusion tl 


glass* own handwriting there is not 
a wOTd, not a menticm ' of ever 
having passed atomic sketches, 
atomic data, atomic screts to Julius 
I Rosenberg. 

“And not a single word about 
Ins sister, Ethel Rosenberg. Not 
one’woid, not one mention. Yet 
at the trial David Greenglass sent 
his sister to the death house. 


that diey were written by one a 
th same person,” 

The Greenglass document v 
written Tune 9, 1950, nearly a v 
before toe trial. In it he stated, 
part: 

“Here are some t>f the sta 
ments 1 made to the FBI.” 

He then goes on to say, “I id 
tified Cold bv a tom or cut pi* 


^ of card, but I didnt tell th 

Can these c‘ontradictions also,^,^^ j 



be explained by Greenglass* key 
formula: T didn’t remember this, 
ibut I allowed it in the statement/ 

li “Shall the Rosenbergs face the 
!i eleeme chair on this sort of testi- 

ENwiy one of . these statements 
madis a year before he testified 


definitely placed my wife out 
the room at die time of the vi 
Also, I didn’t know' wIk> sent G 
to me.** 

He then adds, “I can hone: 

a that the* informaton I g; 

inay be not at all wha* 
said in die statemebt.” 


Government* 


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1^ w 16 ymin ^ .SSbs mid 
that he wood aqr llii^ 'ware 
m evm tf thev «m not He 
k taBoed ol anicm ei SM ivem e 
; chaxader in die meviei but die 
dadn't think be woeU do it* * 

Craeni^aa, M‘ hii w ritt en 
I etatement oarroboatef bb arife'i 
f d eicri ption of i>”n in thiiladikai: 
. nAff (die FID Mid M that 
I had teU Idbi (jamry CM) la 
oome back btter bao«aa ItUdbl 
bare d tmdy» 1 Mm*t tmmtm- 
her tbit but 1 alowed It ■ litt 

M ^ Id ^ 

SuimSRIu 

At the trial be repeal dik 
willingDett to have, odiea i»> 
member jfbr bim in atiednar coti> 
aectiao ip, 590) ''A. I-I had t(dd 
then about Ihis^wbat they pot 
in the atateme&t what tb^ 
wanted me to put in the ttate^ 
ment, wbat they vtanfeed me to 
put in die statement in the fint 
diing, they told me was just to 
make a general statement, dSat 
t* * -T " » • -1^ 

Min, at (be M^'‘'iie tmeffiap, 
M respect to Hai^ Gold, aa 
fcflowi: P. 4»7. Q. “Now, after 
mutual identification nMs ef- 
fected, did you have any cori* 
venation with Harry Cold?* 

A. Yes, I ohFered han soam* 
to eat and he said be had 
•beady eaten. He just vnmtod to 
kn^ if* I had any infonnatioii 
ai^ J said, 1 have some but I 
wiU have to write it up. If you 
«»nj in *e nf^noon I 

L'!!!?! ^ *“ 

TO tell him the story about one 
«* the peopio I put into the re- 
port, and he~ 

^0. Who was one of die oeo- 
pte ytm put into the report?” 

m A* ^ fellow by the neme of 
neni' i'buii. a nd he cut me short.* 


^ aTiriteZSli 

In the hicht of bis wileV de- 
acription of him. these ciiscrap- 
•**cie5 have lo be viewed as 
more than inoooent slips and 
lecovcries. 

more such examplM 
•hall be given. ■ ■ . . 


fi«m 

padwas aSt bttr own 1 
was dak^ tUs 
Ae fall I would be M 
AfaYaskme.* 

. fa the rimp written ^ 
one finds: Hte Ceaai^ 
^nmed bar ririt M New 


M Mteib 1919* 

: <Noli Mn. G^ote«km 
wie MAtjaadce auori wfam abe 
made dib statement, bnt was ao-* 
taally boma. |art so- 

Mni wi c pBui fha ^***^Hil ifief in 
•podent _ It may be pncnmed 


’• eri d pnt . H may be pees uaieJ 
^ ibe iek |pB preanne tfafa 
ber hiwhand to 'em" a storv.) 


HAo that Ae did nat go (o New 
ki te d ca nalil law maHlbs sAw 
(ite date ber htisbcnd eitablbbed 
as tbe Ikpe of ber viwL . 

It tt jdm siKnificaiit beae diat 

owp 

* l» "lifew bfcafoo mitfl bUsSh^ 
1915, as bar statement fndiraii 

*tben (hcie is' no basis far aqr 
^^vobmaUun sbe attaeqits to 
fa events fa New Meifeo 
fa be r arrivHI The gooero- 
OMnt brought no doe mwen ff fp 
dfaw th a t Mis. C^roemdass was 
fa New Merieo befme Maitih 
IWUI* 

die testified at 
the trial as foQows: p. 678 - 979 , 

0- And did yon .in fact go out 
to New Mexico in Nov. 1944? 

A. I did. 

• • • 

4 

O- And prior to die dine dat 
yooV^ York to go to Now 
M«dco did you have • cemvor* 

defeodMrt* lo. 

W aod Edwl Rowmbeigf ^ 

A. Tm, I did. * 

s ^ w mad^ 


«w DWW mm damg, Ifa wM 
that kii htemb had ink! htei 
that DUvid was wor kin g cq ffa» 
alDmic bomb, and be went on to 
tell me that the aloouc bomb 
was the most destjiicthw weapon 
used m hr . (Aho a 727. 
399.423. 424). ^ ' 

£fsetvhenr in the typewritten 
document, howevex, she e^es 
• statement that oasts* doidit ‘on 


Mwwr as ner nrw anowieogi mai 

sba v bttad bar hud) said fa Nm 


vember, 1944 and lba| ifa al- 
faady knew bafan far vkdt M 
tfa ifate fanb^liteu lifai 


. 'Udi outs doubt od ifa gov- 
aoan^i first prenfae that the 
i fa a enber g i recr ui ted Ciuao|6<^ 
Into a^tonafi aothrftfaa. 

'V •# ^ 

Atimik Oerta' ‘ 

W ot S tenfio i iBd 

' JtHIS DOCTBT ii stran^ben* 
ad by the ooinidete abiteiee fa 
Cie engt a s s* .written st atem ent of 
any pasring of atomae data to 
B c ae nbfcifc although he teafifics 
othttwise at die triad, as well as 
by tfa absence of such a riuurge 
fa Rnth Gieen^ass* tummarDDed 
statement * 

b) la bfi handwritten state- 
ment Gnenglass states wpedh 
oaanJSilm^Xail^k •wMr wtw* 
' faJfllaG! fa aw." 

^evntfate he tesHffa at the 
triri, p. 457. A. There was a 
fai^ » tfa door and I opened 
y* we had just completed eating 
fatokrait, and diere was a man 
^ hallway who 
I were My. Creenglass, 

faroogh the door and he said 
Julhis sent me.* and I said 'oh.* 
walk^ to my wife’s purse, 
took out the wallet and took out 
^jmatched part of the }e0o 

. '^^.portloo of his tesdnumy fl 
» tortfaer undermfaed by his I 
statement. "Also I dcf. 

■ faiteiy .placed my wife oot of (ke 
mm at the Ikae of CoUTs vteit.” 

On page 699-700. Mrs. Creen- 
mmi leatifiee tKat slie wwi pnm- 
mSjdorti^^jhe vWi of Geld, eed 

man she aavs. "Sw bad fawme- 
bteed na viiitmi at bar baeae 
(fa Afinnqnrqoe).* 

Whether (^dd ensr visited 
them is less impnrtant fheiff 
.wfatiter the Rosi^bergs sail 
GeV?, lit Is upon diis latter point 
^t ^th David and Rudj 
Creenpass now cast considerable 
doubt This ii apart from tfa 


.tkmaJ doubt on lids qpfsoda. He 
writes: Mm (his 11 lai ynu 1 
can hn itt rth > jay tfa fafinriiiatfaii 
1 gm ^Gald maM mI at aB 
what IrmU M 4a iTatfianit* 


Thfi b p aeoefad by. «t Mb 

amde a fanefi dfateb af aa a B. 
meU lii ap ifmm atepmfawak.* 

At fa fafafa fan to- 

.cident rividly ' 

Hb ^iffnifn _ — r mil 

fa^fa“ <"te to dbhrfi a v a faM 
O^^Bogh m ^ ear tefar bb 
•ema^. falliar/ 1 tends to 

to pleaw Ifa fTsaai idliai 

(e) Ifa gmaxmMBfi fabd 
major pMmfa wag ^gg ^ 
BanAn rnceiyad bom 
Vneoghm a dmkb ci dm* .a- 

.notes aial fanraheL ■ * 

TV AtaAttoM to poinb » 


' :tHLlB[K IS A FUITHEB 
eontradiotioD -between Creen- 
gkm* o m fa s i on of the Rosen* 
Seitgi as’ aOeged recipients of 
fafonnaltoo aim his testimooy to 
QOurt oonoamtog his first and 
tahaaownt statesnents to the 
mf. 57a 

Q, Am you now stattog that 
. fnn did not withhold oOos c icD- 
lioaily and tofonnatkm concern* 
ito yra lUegal activitks at Los 
. Alamoi and elsewhere- to the 
Fir anthorities on toe evening 
of June 15, 1950 and toe early 
hours of the moriiing of June 
16. 1990? 

A, That b tobstanliany what 
I mean. 


^ fir (he ahamne of avoii^S 
•^“ehjn^aclfan fa Gfaoiglaw' 


Oomparfag this to his hand* 
w iittcu ftatement, with the 
afiofemenllQfiied omisskm. it b 
p lai n that Craenglan is lytof. 

passfaf of the secret of the 
alain boodi to Roscidicrg cannot 
fa conridemd kss than substan* 
ttiL or fan! l ao enh a rg had sent 
Gcnd to Uni* 

One can only ooodude* that 
^icmoBbcBad* dds later. 


P®fam]y‘goe cannot say toat 
Creenjdms was attempting to 
shield hb 'brotoer-to4aw. cme* 
ebewbot. as shown, he says 
that be was reensited into es*. 
Ptonage Uvk by Jtdiiis Bosen- 

This faudit it further bolifarw 


^ NO WEBQUS to toe band* 
teiittoo deiennient or in Ruto 
Greengfaw* summarined state* 
ment is tfaeie any mentidii of 
fifael R osenberg^ But in all the 
foregntog pentiob of transcript, 
Creengjbus and his wife mention 
£tod as being active to tba 
ooD^pnacy. 

(To Btf Continued) . 


'll 




Th® Qnengiass Ooctimants Analysaci^ 

"^ly »0Pk«.. toy 6. 1953. -g. 2, 


t 


4 



) 



of the 

Workax* 

Pote _ ^ f - 


CUppid at the Seat' of 
Government. 


ALL ■•■■•••■' • •. •- 


; f 


— - -- ' ? r_i eVai Poir>^^ /t 




/ - 


- 4^?r 









2 ▼orl[gr» 1t<tr T#A» *ttari^y. May T» IfSS 



On Sunil^, May A, the eeunlry tva$ given gemaiional 
new evidence mlding new weight to the charge that iho 
entire government cate vigainMt the Rotenbergt it a frhnuh 
up. This new evideiice, written JunOy 19S0y is now in tha 
hands of President Eisenhowery sent to him hj the Com- 
miitee for Justice in the Rosenberg Case in its appeal for ^ 
clefnehcy and a new trial. 

The new evidence consists of two documents whose 
authenticity is unquestionedy one in the handwriting of 
David Creenglassy key witness against the RosenbergSy 
and the other a ty peter itten statement Aum marking the 
pre-trial Itatements of his wifcy Ruth. There are sensa* 
tional contradictions between these early statements by 
the key witnesses and their Utter testimony in the courts 
room. ^ . 

Another amasmg fact is that neither of the key wit- 
nesses mentioned Ethel Rosenberg until they got to the 
courtroom in Marchy 1951. 

The Rosenberg committee has sent the analysis given - 
bdow to President Eisenhower. 

Following is the concluding section of this new evU 
dencey of which the first part was publish^ yesterdays 



ETHEL ROSENBERG JUUUS ROSENBERG 


4. In his handwritten docu- 
jment Grecnglass states, then 
mentioned a meeting with a man 
|who I didn’t know arranged by 
Julius, I established the approx- 
.imate vneeting place but no 
exact date. The place was a 
car, an Olds owned by nay 
father-in-law, somewhere above 
42nd Street on 1st Avenue in 
Manhattan. I talked to the man 
but 1 recall very little about 
which we spoke, I thought it 
might be that he wanted me to 
think about finding out about 
H, £, lenses used in exp^ri* 
mental tests to determine data 
on the a-bomb,** 

8y the time the trial took 
place, ^ the stranger -the *'raan 
.1 didn’t know” had acquired a 
, I^vLSsian nationality, p. 451. 
Q. Did he (Julius Rosenberg) 
tell you who this person he 
wanted >'ou to meet was? 

A. He said it was a Russian 
he wanted me to meet. 

• • • 

Did People - 
Visit Her? 

IN MRS. CREENGLASS’ 

summarized statement, the fob 
lowirig appears: ^’People keep 
flocking in the house to offer 
I support arid advice including 
dthat perhaps a right-wing law- 
nyer should be selected.” 

D At this time, according to the 




first paragraph of this statement, 
'^She was in bed as she had just 
returned from the hospitaL” 

But at the trial she testifies 
as follows, p. 733. 

Q. Were you interviewed By 
newspaper men at any time be- 
tween the 15th of June, an(* 
three, foiu* or five days then 
after? 

A, No. 

Q. You are quite sure of that? 

A. 1 was in bed. Nobody 
came into the house. 

And yet on June 19th, *peo- 
pie keep flocking in die house." 

The discrepancy would not 
be important were it not for the 
fact that she is attempting to 
d^y that she ever ^ maintained 
that she and her husband were 
innocent, thus, eliciting neigh- 
bc^hood sympathy. 

This is proven in the follow- 
ing lines, p. 733. 

Q. When did you go to see , 
Mr. Rogge? 

A. He came to see me. ' 

Q. At your home? 

A. That’s right 

(X Do you remember the 
dayr 

A. Yes. 

Q. Did you tell Mr. Rogge 
that you were innocent? 

A. No, 1 told him the whole 
truth. . _ UL 

The summary document be- 
lies this later pose of instant 


' t 1:;* ^ . '-r • J 






This is a clipping fron 
Pags of the 

Dally Worker 

Data . 

Clipped at the Seat of 
Goverhnezit. 

rM 


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C- ^ 






confession in these wor^ - 

ifk |ohn Rogge) polnteo 

out tfiat if Dave was 
he should talk; Aat if not rt 
would be advisable not to talk 
but to let the Govemment ptove 
its case, 'fhe third course was 
that of cooperation. That wm 
yign discuss^ Bt lengA. 

If the third course, “coopery 
tion ” was discussed at 
in the absence of any definito 
statement of innocence or {put, 
it could only lead to Ac situa- 
tion which Acse documents re- 
veal; namely that -Grc^glass 
and his wife were both prepai^ 
to help "make" a case in order 
to save Aeir own skins. 

It is significant that Ac state- 
ment on discussing coopei atkm 
is Ae neat to the last sentence 
in Ac document. The last one 
“Xhcrc was a long discusskm 
about-JR." 

There Ae document ends, 
wiA JR (Julius Rosenberg?) 
mentioned for the first AncI 


the summary docu- 
ment, far from giving a hint 
lof guilt, actually ^ves one Ae 
impression Aat Mrs. Greenglass 
feels herself an object of per- 
secution. There is a that 
Green glass had hrou^t home 
some uranium, and had been 
questioned about it by the I* Rl» 
Mrs. Greenglass complains that 
she and her husband were fol- 
lowed about and bo Acred by 
the FBI. 

7-Doubt is even cast on Ae 
testimony Aat the Greengl^s 
family, brought g4,{)00-David s 
espionage wages— to Rogge al- 
most immediately upon Davids 
arrest. “Mrs. Greenglass urged 
OJR to try to get a court 
pointment for himself and he 
agreed to try. 

It is very unlikely, unless the 
Greenglasses were prepared at 
Aat time to plead innocent, Aat 
Aey w'ould consider $4,000 too 
small a sum to pay for an^ at- 
torney. Had they, as Aey claim 
in their court testimony, at once 
confessed their guilt, they would 
undoubtedly have considered 


$4,000 a very adequate sum | 
of money to j^y wwyei to 

plead Aem guuty. , — 

• • • 

. finally, we COhffi to 

one characteristic o£ Ae Green- 
glass handwritten statement. 

In portions it does not i 
]jke a man nairetmg Ae troA, t 
but more like a man carefully 

framing a story. . « ^ 1 

1 made sure to tcH Ae \ 
Aat she was transmitfog to 
info frtwn my brother-in-law ^ 
“I established Ae approxunato 
meeting place hut M exart 
date"-"Also I definitely placed 
my wife out of the romn. 

. To any one fa mili ar wiA taJ^ 
mg statements from accused 
persons, this language is inven- 
tive rather than narr ative. 

• • • 

CONCLUSIONSi These two 
documents, taken togeAcr, in- 

Acate: _ 

That Ae Greenpasses w«e 
at first prepared to plead in- 
nocent; , 

T^t Aey quiddy chose to 

"cooperate" wiA Ae prosecu- 
tion: 


That their "cooperation" con- 
sisted of making statements at 
variance wiA oAer known state- 
ments and facts. ^ 

The documents are argu- 
ments for two steps: (1) Presi- 
dential clemency, so that ^ 
danger of electrocution in the 
face of newly raised doubts 
will be set aside, Aus gi^^g 
time for furAer cxploratiOT. 
(2) Recognition by eiAer Ac 
appropriiite District Court, the 
Court of Appeab, or Ae Su- 
preme Court Aat Ae case n^ts 
a full scale investigation by Ae 
Courts. a "w 


Thl0 Is a clipping fron 

Pa®e X of the 

Dally Worker 

Date -T/y/r? 

Clipped at the Seat of 
Government. 



/tZLt/yrJ 


By MILTON HOWABD 

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER now has on his‘ desk two documents sent to 
him hy the Rosenher^ defense committee, which if millions of Americans could see, 
would surely preventAej^^^^^^^^^Ethel^andjM^^^^^^^^^g 

£d«r Dr." W. E. B. docuibents in Ae handwriting of the government’* chief witness. 

I&Bois as a for- ■ ' 

elgn agent” ' ' * 


is a clipping from 

^ of the 

jr Worker 


The docuinent* in Ae handwriting of the government’* chief witness. 


ss. S^'^/0-^^3' 

— At Seat of 
Govemment. 




■Cr- ri L - 




5-U 


/ 




^ That their *cooperatioii** 
nsisted of makhig slalements 
hne year before die trial, June 
i950, which dip not |tbe witib' 
what thi^ told the fury in 
March 195L* 

• ^at the dihigi they added! 
to thetr jtories at the trial were 
precisely those things needed 1^ 
the prosecution to plug up the. 

holes in the prosecu* 
don's effort to implicate Green- 

glass* sister, Ethel, and her hus* 
hand, Julius; 


THE WORLD NOW knovrt 
of the fantastic yam— unsupport- 
ed by a sin^^e item of evidence 
or by a single witness— told by 
die leini • educated, obscure 
Anny sergeant, Creenglass who 
claim^ he overheard scraps of 
scientists* conversations at ^Loi 
Alamos befom the Hiroshima 
atom-bombing and on Ae basis 
of these conventions, drew 
froxx^ memory a 12-Mge plan 
of ^ thS atom homo secret** 
which was then “given to the 
Russians.** 



The two new dociunentsi 
made public at first in FrancJ 
by die antx-Communist papers 
.Combat and Le Monde, 
destroy coinoletely what was*^^ 
always an innerently unbeliev* 
able tale, branded as such by 
Nobel Prize winner Dr. Harold 
C. Urey, Prof. Albert Einsfein, 
and the Manhattan Project 
atomic expert. Dr. Ralph Lapp. 

The documents* autfaenHcity 
was confirroed this week in a 
remarkable statement by O. 
'John Rogge who tried to ex- 
plain away dieir damaging ef- 
fect on die Creenglass testi- 
mony by saying: fold 

part of his story to the FBT 
and later gave die rest** (N.Y. 
Times, May 4 .) 

But it was precisely the way 
Creenglass* original “Mrt of the 
story** was elaborated Tatcr** to 
fit the prosecution's needs w*hich 
constitutes the amazhig lifting 
of the lid on this incr^lble po- 
litical frame-up. 

★ 

HERE ARE the main points 
which a contrast of the two new 
documents and the court record 
brings out: 

• Green^ass* wife, Ruth, de- 
clared before the trial, as her 
first comment on her husband's# 


ETHEL AND JUUUS ROSENBERG 


yam: 

“She said he Would say IhinL 
(Continued on Page 13) | 




7 • a U- 8 1 , 3«>*fa 


Thlflie a clipping frcn 
/ of the 

Daily Worker 


Date J"' 10' 3 
Clipped at the Seat of 
Government. 



1 


5-11 




\\ 


(Condnued from Page 1) 
were to even tf ther ynm not. 
(Typewritten memo, Jane 19 
1950). * * ’ 

• Creendass did not know 
Harry Cold, alleged contact be- 
tW6CTi h i in sod di0 Rosen^> gr g!e 
Juno 1950, nor did he Invite Gold 
to come back later" in his orig- 
mal statemcnf; nor did he say that 

sent 

roe. But in tfie ti^J testimony 
he changed aH this. He reveals’ 
that ^ FBI **toId me that I had 
told him (Hany Gold) to come 
back later because I didn't have 
it ready.** The he adds this dam- 
aging revelation: 

“I didn’t remember rtii« but I 
I allowed it in the statement.” 

Thus, the FBI was coaching him 
to say what was needed for the 
trial and the prosecution. 

• Greenglass claimed that his 
^vife talked over with him the 
©ving of "information” to Julius 
Rosenberg when she met him in 
New Mexico in November, 1944. 
jBut, Mrs. Greenglass* typewritten 
‘Statement now reveals that ^e 
I could not have been In New Mex- 
ico when this alleged conversation 
j Ujas supposed to have taken place. 

I She stated at first that she did not 
jget to New Mexico imtil four 
! months later, March 1945! She 
c^nged this in the trial however 
nine months laterl ' 

• She claims that Julius Rosen- 

the atom bomb 
With her before she went to New 
Mexico, March. 1945; but in her 
statement it comes out that it was 
only after Hiroshima, July, 1945, 
tnat she became aware of the 
atom bomb! Thus, she either never 
wth Julius Rosenberg, or 
; it she aid, it could not have been 
I about the atom bomb as she 
claimed at the triall 
! • In his handwritten statement. 

jOr^nglass said about the alleged 
am^l of Ifarry CJold, (this is the 
highly dubious character sent to 
jail after his "confession” to Judee 
McGrane^, the same man who 
later as U. S. Attorney General, 
suppressed the Popc*s plea for 
clemCTcv) that "I didn't know who 
sent Gold to me.” 

at ^he trla^ he daoges this 


basica^ to mvt^ve the Rosen* 

STP ^ 

^ 7u]ius sent me*.” 
(P. 457, trial record). 

^ statement before tho 
niai, Mrs. Greenglass savs "Sho 
had rememUmd no visito to 

New Mex- 

w. But at the trial, she conveni- 
ently recalls the visit of the gov- 
ernment witn^s. Gold, even though 
Greendass statement de^tdy 
places her outside the room during 
this alleged vait! * 

^ • Nowhere in the original state- 
ments wm Ethel Rosenberg ever 
mentioned by either of her accus- 
ml Only at the trial did they bring 
her m; but even then not as having 
en^ged in any espionage, but only 
as JcDowmg about it 
• In his original statement. 
Greengl^ says he did not ^ow 
wh^ he aUegedly met in New 
York as a contacC nor did he re- 
^11 what was said. Bvt at the trial 
ros memory amazin^y revived 
enough to say that the "contact” 

(p. 45T. Trial 
Record). This is just what the pros- 
ecution needed for its case! 

★ 

are further staggering 
contradictions, all fitting the gov- 
Clients needs later on. On page 
t>78 of the record, Greenglass 
swears on the stand that he "did 
not witlA(^ conscientiously any 
formation” concerning his activ- 

it®® r Alamos. He had told 
the full story, according to his 
own wor^ a year before the triall 
At the trial, he added heavily, in 
new details, what tlie prosecution 
needed. 

With such facts before them, 
how can the American people, 
how can the labor movement sit 
by and watch this planned execu- 
tion take place to "prove” the gov- 
ernment s fantasy that the Korean 
war was earned by “Russians” get- 
ting non-existent "secret” given to 
diem by non-existent "Communist 
atom spies,” the Rosenbergs? 

If ever President £«enhow)er 
should hear pleas from the people 
for clemency so that justice can 
look into this amazing case, that 
time is now. The Supreme Court 
may hand down its finalvej^Jjgj ni 
two weeks. 



) 


This 1b a clipping fnoa 
Page ot the 

Dally Worker 

Date S- /a 

Clipped at the Seat of 
Government. 

zsP- 








rcf'r ..TI/.L 


w 

cc - 


BELUONT 





# 






Aaatatant Attorney General 
Wcrren Clney I.- I 


May 22, IS’53 


lirector, FBI 

os^s $c 

JULIUS ROStSB 
ESPIONAGE - 2 


f 


A/?. 

* ^9 


y iQ 

0t cl 


-/C 7 ^ 


P.ef erence ia sicde to our membrcnduK of Hey 
l'J53, reporting information from, a confidential aource 
concerning one FyHe Farmer, SoahvillOf Tennesseap attorneyp 
taho hca advanced the theory that the Roaenberg Case can be 
thrown out of court on o habeas corpus beccuae it was tried 
under the old espionage law instead of the Atomic Energy 
Control Act, 


a 

£3 




& 


a 


VI 

rv2 \1 

O S”< 

Uh 

# i 

;--l •<- ■< 

[ .1 Pc! 

a; 

y 




rv 


TonU 
Udd — 


Nidrals 

B«lnoat 

Ocf* 

GlaTia 

llarbo 

Rom* 

Troqr 

Gcaitf 

Mohr 


Our files reflect t/ict a Fyke former, undoubtedly 
identical with the above-mentioned individual, wca a prac- 
ticing attorney at Nashuillep Tsnneaseep for many years* 
About 1345 or 1346 he reportedly beecne intensely interested 
in world government to the extent that he gave up hia law 
practice and hca since devoted full time to urging eatab- 
liahm-r.t of a -rcrld governs : nt, /Icq-iair.tancea ot U^shville, 
7’enn ess s rejerd • c-r'icr cs an im tract ical idealist. They 
state that while they do not believe 'cr er toould ever sub- 
scribe to a Communi::- 1 cystem o?' jo V€rn:ii int, he could be led 
by Comrxunists, Farrier wza a signer o^ the Amici puriae 
brief filed with the United States Court of AppeclSp Second 
Circuit, urging reversal of the conter^pt of court conviction 
of several attorneys in the conspiracy trial of the eleven 
Communist leaders. 


rrr 


I • 


r, 'dwzrd. Ranaall, a reporter of the York 

Times,” has advised our New York Office that farmer visit'^d * 
him. on May 15, 1S53, farmer told Ranrall thut a ‘ter st dying 
the Rosenberg Cass record, he did not believe the court had 
the power to invoke the death penalty beec.^se of a techni- 
cality in the indictj.ent. Farmer stated he had 3 ..b^ittod 
a writ of kabfoa corpus to the United states JuprcPiC Court 
but did not pay the filing fee of ylOO and, therefore, a 
writ has not been issued. Farmer edviaed Ranaall thjat he f 
had been invited by Joseph Brainin, Chairm.an of 'the h'attoncf 
Committee to Zecuro Justice in the Rosenberg Case, to. v; r 
ilea fork City, where he citended a conference, at .whibh 
Fmanuel Bloch, attorney for Vie Rosenbergs, was present. 


1^0 


CT; 




O C-fT 


Block told ^rcinin end 
action taken b\: 'ariner 


Tcirncr that he 
c/id intmacd to 


ucc 

do 


oppostyd to the 
nothift'y about 




Viof rcrowd 

T ele. Room — 
Ilotlotnao 

Sir-'io 

Mi 






technicality in the indictment at this time. According 
to Farmer g Bloch hae adoiaed the Supreme Court and the 
Attorney General that he ia not in sympathy with the 
action of Farmer* . 

The foregoing is for your inf ormation* 


65^56236 


•TAMMflP raw MOC i« 



Office Mjem^andum • united st^es government 


TO 


3 mOM t 


8UBJBCT: 


MR, 



MR, 


S, BELMONT 

) m 

x i I rrCT»r irri T/irrr 



HENNRICH. 


JULIUS ROSENBERG; 
ETHEL- '‘ROSENBERG; 
ESPIONAGE - R 


DATE: May 29, 1953 




Tolsofl 



rooftt, 

CIe« — 
GUtio _ 

Harbo 

Rosen 

Trncf , 


Lsuxblia 

Mohr 


VtMerrovd 

Tele. Rs 

HalUman 
Candy 


Supervisor Scott Miller called from New York at 
10:45 a,n,. May 29, He advised that Judge Kaufman had 
just set the date of execution for the Rosenbergs for the 
week of June 15, 1953, Supervisor Miller speculated that 
since executions are usually held on Thursdays at Sing Sing, 
the actual executions probably will occur on June 16, 


A CTION: 


For your information. 


GEH:LL 

CO^MR, NICHOLS 






34 ^ /4 7 7 


' T 


* ‘ * .i. J • '* 


* *r ■ * 


;d 




■ ■ • > . I • 


- 


I J 'i -si 'i - - 



r 

7 




















June 11, 19S3 


<7, Ueraon 

Zeuka Park, Few York 
Pear I/adamt 


^ letter 0 / June 2, 1953, has been 

received by me and T have noted your obaeruationa 


Federal Bureau of Tnueattgation ia 
the investigative Bureau of the Department of 
Justice^ The matter of prosecution end the calling 
of vttneasea to testify ia within the province 
of the United States Attorneys of the various 
districts. It kr.s al'cays been the colicu of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation to imvariiallu 
determine the facts of a case. 


^Lso 

mi n 15S3 

COMM.WI 


Tory truly youra. 


John Edgar Eoover 
Pi rector 


cn 


ur 


CO ^ 2 ^ Buffalo 
2 - Piant 

(Kote: Htention Buffalo and Uiami) 


A 

t 


/ 

J 


Tol 

Udd _ 
Nichols 
Bclaoat 

Cle„- 

GUTiii ^ 

Hsfbe 
Rosea 
Tracy 
Lau(hltD 
Mohr 
Viaterrowd 
Tele, Rm. . 
ilo)Joinan_. 
Gandy 



The Bureau has previously received a communication 
ffom Ifrs, F • fr, Person and it was acknowledged by Bureau 
.istier dateef January 30, 1953, to her, carbon copies of whic\ 
»cro transmitted to your offices. By letter dated June 2, 

■ IfrSai f/0rsoft odvised that sha hcB observed that meny 

people are now coming to think that the Bosenberga are 
i^..innoc,eni fPfd that ft would be rather good for the FBI to j 
'make it clear tha^ it wes not the FBI who pushed the trial 
thro :gh,,'as she herself had previously considered it to be 
a Bureau effttir. She is honing, that they will not 

your information only, , 


be 


65-5^236 — 
WW : awy : dnd 



>LL INr-OKMATION 
13 UHCW- 


C*. 


ft T ' ■ *i 
i. • 




1 * T 






I, 



Office 


UNITED^TA.*.!S GOVERNMENT 


TO 


DATE; 5/28/53 


FROM 


SUBJECT: 




^,1 


/ 

J 


— y 


Director, FBI 

ATTE NTION; Inspector CARL HjINNRICHS 
SAC, M (65-15314-8) 

JULIUS' ^ROSENBERG; 

ET AL -6 

ESPIONAGE - R 

There la forwarded herewith for the information pf ^he 
Rureau a photoatatlc copy of a notice of motion for a. writ of 

IZd^s directing Judge IHVING ^ ‘Saving 

PD^FNBERGS or reconsider his decision of January 2$ 1953 > y 6 
aS application for a reduction of sentence, together with a - 
ohotostatic copy of a notice of motion and petition for an order 
Vacating or correcting the sentences of death . 

ROSENBERGS on the ground that the sentences are illegal in 
the^were in excess of the maximum allowed by law; namely, 

twenty years* 

The application for a writ of mandamus is returnable 
in the CoSt of Appeals on June 1, 1953, and ^e motion for 
vacating or correcting the sentences will be heard on June 1, . 

TQcr-j. in the District Court* 


1953, in th® District Court* 

There is also enclosed herewith a photoatatlc copy 
a letter dated August 18, 1914-9, and signed by TOLIUS ROSENBERG, 
President of the Pitt Piachine Products, Inc. This letter was 
made available by RUTH GREENGLASS, and the Bureau was advised 
of the sQino by New York teletype j dsted Msy 26 f 953® 

Mr. PARSER of the Railway Express Agency made available 
copies of literature which is being disseminated by the National 
Committee to Secure Justice in the Rosenberg Case* The follow- 
ing material is forwarded herewith for the information of the 

Bureau: 






A 2k page pamphlet entitledT^ive Us Your Hand," com- 
prised of poems and songs for Ethel and Julius Rosenberg in the 
Death House at Sing Sing, by EDITH St-GAL. 

A pamptaet entitled, "Tl>e^tican and, the Rosenberg 


Case . 


. ^f*0a3e." 

' 4''-\ 

^ Encs. (7) 



A pamphlet ent itled^/'^^ew Evidence\l.n the Rosenberg 

a 


X 


SPECIAL DELIVERY 
JAHtMEQ 


liSfCOftDEO-^ I 


'E0-$ 







6S JliNl's 1953 




• • 


Letter to Director 
NY 65-15348 

PstBip hlct entltl 
Interview With Ruth Gree 
menioranduin of ROBERT . 
ROGGE, dated June 19, 1950. 


id, "Memorandum Describing Lawyer’s 
nglass.” This is a reprint of a 
GOLDMAN, former associate of 0, JOHN 


2 





Introduction 

Since the Spring oiT 1951, when Ethel 
Julius Rosenbeig were sentenced to death 
Morton Sobell to SO years at Alcatraz at 
conclusion of a hurried ten-day trial, an 
growing debate has developed throughout the 

country ns to the fiacts in the cstse. 

. • . ' - • 

Jn March, 1952, the National Onnmittee to 
Secure Justice in the Rosenberg Case published 
the Entire trial transcript. On the basis of 
these transcripu. thousands of which were sold 
throughout the country, the national debate on 
the facts in the Rosenbeig case assumed tre- 
mendous proportions. ? 

Dr. Harold Ur^, Prof. Albert Einstein, Prof. 

many attorneys, educators 
and religious leaders called for clemency. More 
and more people became convinced that grave 
doubt exists as to the guilt of the Rosenbergs 
and Morton Sobell and that the short ten-day 
trial did not contain the necessaiy guarantees of 
.^a fair trial imder the American Constitution. 
Eighty thousand Americans signed an amicus 
brief, requesting a netv trial for the Rosenbergs 
and Morton Sobell. Many more thousands ap- 
pealed to the President of the United Sutes to 
grant clemency to the Rosenbeigs. 

Now, in the Spring of 1955, new documents 
have come to light, throwing serious doubt on 
the testimony of David and Ruth Greenglass, 
chief witnesses against the Rosenbeigs. These 
documents, first published in France, were pre- 
sented to the American people at a public rally 
of 10,000 people at Randall’s Island Stadium in 

New York on May 3, 1953. 

1 

In the interest of seeking the truth in the 
Rosenberg Case, guaranteeing American Justice, 
and preventing the tragic execution of two 
people who to this day maintain their complete 
innocence, we present these documents to the 
American people. 


liii 


The Documents 



1 'yi\ 


r •r- • . 


r — ' ^ - 

The documeiits received by the National Committee to Secure 
Justice in the Rosenberg Case arrived fom the French Rosenberg 
Committee in the form of photostatsl 

The first document consists of three pages written in David 
Creenglass* own handwriting. These three pages were later authen* 
ticated by a foremost handwriting expert, Mrs. Elizabeth McCarthy, 
ol Boston, Mass. The document is dated “Saturday, June 1950” 
It purports to be a statement or recapitulation of what David 
Creenglass told the F.B.I. 

The importance of this document lies in the contradiction 
it gives to Creenglass’ courtroom testimony; it is written in the 

I ‘ - * 

language of a man inventing a story rather than telling a truthful 

narrative; it contains serious and inexplicable omissions, and 

• * ^ 

finally, confesses that he permitted the F.B.L to “remember” for 
him events he could not himself recall. 

The second document, dated June. 18, 1950, is a typewritten 
one, also of three pages, which ap|>ears to a memorandum from 
an attorney for his files. It concerns a discussion between members 
of the law firm and relatives of David Creenglass. This second 
document is likewise of extreme importance because in it Mrs. 
Ruth Creenglass, David’s wife, contradicts vital aspects of her 
husband’s written statement and courtroom testimony and por- 
trays her husband as an hysteric and liar. This dc^ment provides 
evidence that Creenglass committed perjury. 

These two documents do not deal with peripheral or secondary 
matters in the case. They go to the heart of the case, and therefore 
raise fundamental doubts, which, when taken in the context of 
other doubts — particularly the absence of a single document link- 
ing the Rosenbergs to a “conspiracy to commit espionage” — cause 
the trial to be viewed in an altogether new light.^ 

The following pages present a comparison of the newly dis- 
covered documents with the Creenglass testimony. 




“TENDENCY TO HYSTERIA^' 





;> 




In a decision of the U^; Court of Appeak, Judge Jerome. N. Frank said: 
**Poubtl^ if that (Greenglass) . testimony were disregarded the conviction 
(against the Rosenbergs) could not.stand/^ 

In effect Judge Frank pc^ed the questipn — which man will you believe, 
David Greenglass or Julius Rosenbeig? If Greenglass lied there is no case against 
the Rosenberes. , . 

‘ -i ■ • • ■■ ■ ■ '* • 

■ I . 

One of the new documents, the typewritten lawyer's memorandum describ- 
ing an interview with Ruth Greenglass, David's wife, gives an intimate account 

• . I*. 

of what kind of a person Greenglass is. .Here, is a report of what Greenglass* 
wife has to say about him: 

^Aa to her husband^ she stated that he had a Hendencj to 
hysteria/ At other times he would become delirious and once whoi 
he had the grippe he ran nude through the hallway, shrieking of 
^elephants*, and ^lead pants/ ’ 

^She had known him since he was ten years old. She said that 
he would say things w^ere so even if they were not. He talked of suicide 
as if he were a character in the movies but she didnU think he would 
do it.’’ 


GREENGLASS ADMITS LIE 

In the document in Greenglass* handwriting, he frankly admits making 
statements he did not remember to be trile, and directly lying to the F.B.I. He 
writes, describing a statement to the F.B.I.: 

stated that I met Gold in N. M. at 209 Hick St., my place. 
They told me that I had told him to eome back later because I didn’t 

have it ready. I didn’t remember this but I allowed it in the statement.” 

' .. : <' • ' ^ 

... ‘ ^ '• V . 3 t\ -i i'r 

* / 

Thus he admits letting the F.B.I. put words into^is mouth. Then he adds: 

^But this m tell you, I can honestly say the information I gave 
. Gold may be not at all what I said in the statement.” 


- 4 ^ 




The language Greenglass uses throughout his written document is that of 
a man fabricating a story. **1 made sure to tell the F.B.L**, '*1 established the 
approximate meeting place**, “I definitely placed** — these arc the kind erf. 
phrases he uses. 

SUMMARY — Dr« Harold C* Urej, nudear acientiat, said after reading 
the transcript of the trial: found the Rosenberg testimony more believ- 

able than the Creenglaas.*’ 

David Greenglass, a hysteric and a self-confessed liar, la the man on 
whose word two persona have been sentenced to die. 

HISTORY REFUTES TESTIMONY 

The most damaging testimony against Ethel and Julius Rosenberg was the 
sworn testimony of Ruth and David Greenglass, who claimed that the Rosen- 
bergs recruited them as spies. On the basis of this testimony, above all else, the 
Rosen bergs were condemned to death. 

In his handwritten statement, Greenglass relates how he told the F.B.I. 
that his wife had been sent to recruit him for espionage by Julius Rosenberg. 

He says: 

told them that on a visit to me in November, 1944, my wife 
asked me if I would give information. I made sure to tell the F.B.I. 
that she was transmitting this info from my brother-in-law Julius and 
was not her own idea.^ 

In court Ruth Greenglass went into great detail about the description of 
the A-bomb she purports to have received from Julius Rosenberg in November, 
1944. 


A. (Co&tiDsed) And he said — I wanted to know bow he 
knew whai Da^id was doing. He said that hia f rienda bad 
told him that David was working on the atomie bomhi and 
he went on to tell me that the atomie bomb waa the moat 
deatnietive weapon used so far, that it had dai^roua radia- 
tion effeeta, that the United Statea and Britain were work- 

^ . r - ' . 

Trial Transcript, p. 679 . ■ 

Mrs. Greenglass claimed to have learned ^about the atomic bomb in Nov. 
1944. However, in the ty prewritten document, Mrs. Greenglass admits not know- 


4 


- 5 - 




ing about the bomb until it was dropped on Hiroshima in August, 1945. The 
document states: 

^She would not have allowed her huahand to bring anyt hing 
home after Hiroshima had disclosed what the project was* She in* 
tended to raise a family and did not want that kind of material 
around.^ 

t • ' 

SUMMARY — Thus on the witness stand Ruth Creenglass claimed 
to have known all about the A-bomb in November, 1944* But in the mem<^ 
randum she says that she did not know about the A-bomb until Hiroshima 
in August, 1945 — the time when the American people learned of the bomb* 
If Julius Rosenbeig had told her, as she claimed, of the ^dangerous radia- 
tion effects'* of the atomic bomb in 1944, she would not have had to wait 
until 1945 to learn what the project was* 


WAS GREENGLASS GUILTY OF URANIUM THEFT? 

The prosecution posed an important question — why did Ethel and Julius 
Rosenbeig try to get a vaccination certificate for David Greenglass to leave the 
country? The defense stated the Rosen bergs believed that Greenglass may have 
been involved in theft — possibly uranium theft. 

The document quoting the interview with Mrs. Greenglass admits she and 
her husband were questioned about uranium when an F.B.I. agent visited their 
home in February, 1950. But in the trial, Greenglass refused to say why the F.B.I. 
visited them. The document says: 

^^She (Ruth Greenglass) pointed out Dave did not ask for the 
job; that he was going overseas; that they have been watched con- 
stantly and feels as if they are the object of persecution* Shortly before 
. their accident the F.B.I* asked if they had a specimen of uranium in 
the house, in the course of what they call a routine investigation* One 
of their friends had a similar experience*** - ^ 

. The uranium question was brought out by the trial testimony of Julius 

4 

- 6 - 





Rosenberg, who stated that he believed David Greenglass was Irotible** 
because ol a possible theft of uranium* 


And f recall ti ihai time in my mind tlie incideiit — ^ 
inatant he told me what happened to him in Febrnary adicn 
the FBI had omne around to visit him and qo^tion him 
aboat aooie nraninm. I thought maybe it had somethinf to 
dn with that or had sometMng to do with a converaatian 
Biithie had with maay jeara hack. 


1251 

**I said, *Dave, are yon in trouble or somethingt* 

**He said, *Don*t ask me anything about it Ton got 
to do thia for me. If yon can’t give me the money I need, 
at least do this for me.’ ” 

And the Court asked yon at the time some questions 
, about the fact that you were unfriendly or yon were hostile 
to each other, and in tiie face of that yon said he came to 
you and he put this twofold truest to yoq, the $200D., and 
if yon can’t do that for him,* the certificate showing that 
he bad been vaccinated for smallpox, and also the addi-* 
[fol. 1860] tional matter of asking the doctor while yon 
were at it what was required to go into Mexico. 


Q. Did anybody ever adc you for $2000i for a smaUpox 
wrtificate or what kind of injections were required to gel 
into Mexioot 

A. Yes, David Oreenglass. 

Q. I say, did anybody else ever ask von for anything 
like that? ’ ^ 

A. No, air. 

Q. Did yon proceed to find out wHyf 

A. He was very agitated, and I asked hire in the best 
way I knew how to ask him. 

Q. Did yon suspect why he wanted itf 

A. I suspected he was in some trouble. 

Q. Did you suspect perhaps that it had to do with the 
theft of gasoline from the Annyf 

A. Possibly, part. 

Q. Did you suspect perhaps that it had something to do 
with the theft of uranium from Los Alamosf 

A. Possibly. 

Q. Did you suspect that it had something to do with 
the type of information relating to the atomic bombf 
[fol. 18611 A. No, I didn’t suspect that. 


Trial Transcript, pp. 1121, 1251 

But the Greenglass testimony in the trial deliberately evaded the uranium 
issue. Greenglass — you will note — purporu not to remember why the F.B.I. 
agent visited him 

Q. vrhere did these FHl representativet sea or speak to 
yon in February, 1960? 

A. One man called me up on the phone and he said he 
would like to see me. He came to my house; be sat down 
at my table ; I offered him a cup of coffee mid we spoke — 
he did not say to me that he suspected me of espionage 
or anything else — he just spoke to me about whether I had 
[fol. 802] known anybody at Los Alamos, and that was 
the gist of the whole conversation.,^ He walked out of the 
house maybe an hour later, and that is all there was to St. 

Q. All right now, let’s see. Did he introduce hiiftwlf 
as a member of the FBIf v 

A. He did. 

Q. Did he ask yon any questions, either directly or in- 
dirMtly, with respect to your knowledge of any illegal 
activity that occurred at Los Alsmos while you were theref ' 

A. I don’t recall exactly what the whole conversation 
was about. It made very little effect on me, because it * 
didn’t — I mean, it didn’t seeid like anything — I mean— ^ 


A. I Continuing:) Ho discussed with me — when he came 
into the house it was very difficult to find out what he 
wanted. • He didn’t come out and say that he wanted some 
information. He just talked around the point. I didnft 
get what he really wanted to find out. 

Trial Transcript, pp 564. 565 


SUMMARY — Ruth Greenglass admitted to her attorney that an F.B J. 
agent visited them in February^ 1950» to question them about uranium* 

j 

(Continued on page 10) 


4 


- 7 - 



TEXT OF GREENGLASS' DOCUMENT " 

Saturdaj 
June 1950 

Tliese are my a)>proximate statements to the F.B.I. 

1. I stated that I met Co^d in N. M. at 209 Hick St., myYlace. 
They told me that I had told him to come hack later because 1 didn't 
have it ready. I didn't remember this but I allowed it in the sutement. 
When he came back again 1 told them that I gave him the envelope with 
the stuff not expecting payment and then he gave me an envelope. Later 
I found that it contained $500. 

2. I told them that on a visit to me in Nov. 1944 my wife asked me 
if 1 would give information. I made sure to tell the F.B.I. that she was 
transmitting this info from my brother-in-law Julius and was not her own 
idea. She was doing this because she felt 1 would be angry if she didn't 
ask ibe. 

I then mentioned a meeting with a man who I didn't know, arranged 
1^ Julius. I established the smpibximate meeting place but no exact date. 
*1^ place was a car. an Olds owned by my father-in-law, at somewhere 
above 42iid St. on Ist Ave. in Manhattan. I talked to the man but I could 
recall very tittle about which we spe^e. 1 thou^ it might be that he 
wanted me to think about finding out about H.£. lens^ used in 'experi- 
ment tests to determine data on the A bmnK 

I made a general statement <m my a^, etc; you know, the usual 

thing. 

I mo^tioned no other meetmg with anyone 


One more thing, I identifi^ Gold by a torn or cut piece of card, but 
1 didn't tell them whm or how I got it. Also, I definit^ placed my wife 
out of the room at the time of Gold's visit. 


Also, I didn't know who sent Gold to me. 


1 also made a pencil dcetch of the H.£. mold set up for an experi- 
ment. But this 111 tell you, 1 can hcxiestly say the information 1 gave 
Gold may be not at all what 1 said in the sutement. * 



OIR and I visited Mrs. CreenRlass at her home, 285 Rivington Street, Brot^yn, New York, 
at 4:00 P.M. Sunday, June 18, 1050. She wsu in bed as she had just returned from the hospital. 

We fim discussed t^ ^estion of arranging a meeting of variour relatives at our office to 
discuss financial problems. The relatives proposed are as follows: 


discuss financial problems. The relati 

1. Abe. 

1039 Uok»fi St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel. Slerline 3-6473 
Business Addrm: 

810 Washioaton Si. — > TeL ST 3-6073 

2. Mr. Feit is fstber-m-lsw of lamsi Cobem, 
80 Leffeits Ave. 

Tel.: Jacob Cohen ft Son 
BUdumnster 2-7103 


are as follows; 

3. Noiman Brown (Friend of the famUy) 
7981 Louis St. 

Tel. OR 4-3609 , 

4. Bafoey Zerkel (A cousin) 

2124 East 26th St. 

Tel. DE 2-0312 
3. SsA Grcenelass 

1384 CarolTSt. Telephone: 

6. Rose Stein (Friend) 

7. Stella Silverman (Friend) 


Thiqre was subsequently present during the conference: Issy Feit, Sam Greenglass, Bernanl 
Creen^ass, and l^is Abd 

Mrs. Greenglass discussed her visit to New Mexico. She was there between March 1945 and 


March 1946. They had been married in 1942. She feels that New Mexico is a very bad place 
to try the case since the dttiens did not like Gl's, because of the big boom and then the big 
slad, because of anti-sanitism and because the locd dtizciis all fdt oitter about the wives cw 
the GFs taking jobs there. She was employed in Albuquerque by the OPA and temporarily by 
the Soil Conservation Office. 

As to her husband, she stated that ' he had a **tetidency to hysteria**. At other times he 
would become delirious and once when he had the grippe ie ran nude through the hallway. 


Text of 
Lawyer's 


Memorandum *riekmg of •depham. •. - I^d Panu' 








She had known him since she was ten years old. She said that he would say things were so 
even if they were not. He talked of suidde as if he were a character in the movies but she 
didn*t think he would do it. They had been under surveillance by the FBI for several weeks. 
In particular, they had noticed a car of the Acme Construction Company, 14(X) First Avenue in 
Manhattan. SIm ascertained there was no such Company. pThere is an Acme Constructioa 
Company at 1462 Fulton Street in Brooklyn). She was interviewed at the hospital by two FBI 
men, Mr. TuUy and Mr. Wood. One was t^l, ruddy and dark. The other she described as toothy 
and short They assured ha that they had nothing gainst her. She described her stay in 
Albuouerauc and stated that she could hot remember all of her addresses. Since it was difficult 


Albuquerque ana statea mat sne couia not r e mem ner au or her addresses. Since it was difficult 
for Gl*s to get rooms for a long period, they had lived in five or six places. She had only been 
to Los Alamos to a party for a few hours one time. She had rememberd no visitors at her house. 
She had notice of me project and signed an affidavit for iL She knew her mail was censored. 
She would not have allowed her husband to bring anything home^after Hiroshima had disclosed 
what the project was. She intended to raise a &nily and did-n^ want that kind of material 
around. In the future she wUl refer everyone to her lawyer. 

She ptwted out Dave did not ask for the job; that he was gc^ng oveiseas; that they have 
been watched consuntly and feeb as if they are the object of persecution. Shortly before their 
aoddent the FBI asked if they had a specimen of uranium in ^e house, in the course of what 
they call a routine investigation. One of their friends had a similar experience. 

•People in the neighborhood want to raise a petition. 

All newspapers are to be referred to her lawyer. 

People keep floddng in the Imuse to offer support and advice including that perhaps a 
right-wing lawyer should be selectecL The Jewbh Dwy Forward, which b ceriainly not a lotbt 
newspaper, b very excited about the anti-semitic bsue and has offered a lawyer. Mrs. Greenglass 
urged mR to try to get a court appointment for himself and he agreed to t^. OJR pointed out 
that if Dave was innocent he should talk; that if not it would be advisable not to talk but to 
let the Government prove its case. The third course was that of cooperation. That was also 
at length. 5 

There was a long discussion about JR. 

• 

Qoestiocis to he looked up: • • 

t. Was the atrest vtlid — was be held in det cn tioei 4. S t a tetnen tt of Co-coo^Mratoea. 

More the con^lauit isaned? . ^ 

2. What it the enect of the coet^latfle? 3. Venae 

3. What do the cases bold on tlw totent to ham the ... 

Government?* 6. Joinder 












4. Statements of Co-coo^Mrstoes. 


- - 9 - 





(Ccmtinued from page 7) 

At the trial the Creeng^asses evaded this issue. Is it possible that this might 
account for some of the mone^ which Creenglass received from Gold? Is it 
possible that uranium — precious to the production of the atomic bomb — 
is something which machinist David Greenglass could obtain a little more 
easily perhaps than the secret of the atomic bomb? 


A THREAT CARRIED OUT 


A basic defense theory was that Greenglass implicated Julius Rosenberg to 
lessen his own punishment and protect his wife, Ruth Greenglass. 


Julius Rosenbeig, in direct testimony, stated that Greenglass had threatened 
him in late May or early June, 1950 (before Greenglass' arrest) . The testimony 
. follows: 


Q. Would you aay this was still in BCny, or would yon any 
thU was already in Janet 

A. It might have been the first week in June or the end 
of May. 

Q. Ton are not soret 

A. I can't fix it exactly, if U was a day or two in Jane 
or a day or two in May. 


I 1130 

* toward the East River Drive. I said to Dave at this 
|> point ‘‘You look very agitated. Calm yourself, take it 
[fol. 1679] easy, ^at's troubling yoa"f And he said 
“Julie, I am in a terrible jam." I says “No — I 
realize you have been asking me for money, yon have been 
telling me to go tg my doctor for a oertificate, yoikhave hHn 
, talking about Mexico. What is the trouble, Davet" 

He said “I can't tell you everything abont it All 1 want 
you to do for me, Julie, is I must have a couple of thousand 
dollars in cash." I says “David, I don't have the money 
on me, I car/t raise that kind of money." 

He says, “Julie, can you borrow it from your relatives t" 
I says, “No, Dave, I can't d^ that." 

He says, “Can you take it from the business for me?" 

I says, '‘Dave, I cannot do that." 

“Well, Julie, I just got to have that money and if you 
don’t get me that money you are going to be sorry." 

I said, “Look here, Dave, wbat are yon trying to do, 
threaten me or blackmail me?" - 


Trial Transcript, pp. 1128, 1130 

David Greenglass* handwritten document now confirms the defense theory. 
Greenglass writes: 


- 10 - 


* 




made sure to tell the F.B.L that she (Ruth) was transmitting 
this info from my brother-in*law Julius and was not her idea* She was 
doing this because she felt I would be angry if she didnU ask me*^ 

SUMMARY — From the wording of the written document, made 
sure to tell the F.B.I.% it can be seen that Greenglass deliberately implicated 
Julius Rosenberg, at the same time shielding his wife. Thus the document 
confirms the defense theory and shows how Greenglass made gbod Jiis 
threat against Julius Rosenberg* 


WHOLESALE LYING 

David Greenglass and Harry Gold were indicted in New Mexico on 
charges of espionage. It was on the basis of this indictment that David Green- 
glass vfvs arrested. His early statements deal with Gold almost exclusively. The 
tri.il testimony places greater and greater emphasis upon Julius Rosenberg, who 
Greenglass alleged sent Gold as a spy courier. In light of this direct implication 
of Julius Rosenberg with. Greenglass and Gold it is necessary to take note of 
the following serious discrepancies between the documents and the Greenglass 
testimony. 

Greenglass, in his own handwriting, admits regarding his statement to the 
F.B.L: 

^Also, I definitely placed my wife out of the room at the time of 
Gold’s visit.” 

f 

In direct contradiction, Ruth Greenglass not only testified that she was in 
the room at the time of Gold's visit, but identified Gold from a photograph. 
Her testimony follows: 


■ ■ 

€ 


\ 



- 1 1 - 


V 



A. It aboBt 1:S0 l 

Q. Did tb«f« come a time when somebody did ooino to 
see von in Alboquorqntt 
A. Ten. 

Q. When WAS tbatt 

A. On the first Sunday in Jn^ IMS. 

Q. W)tore were yon at that timef 
A. I WAS in onr apartment on North Hi|'h Stroel 
[fol. 1003] Q. At the time that this person came to ace 
yon, had yon ever seen the person before t 
A. Never. 

Q. Was it a man or a lady t 
A. It was a man. 

Q. Do yon now know who that man isf 
A. Yes, I do. 

Q. Andwhoisbef 
A. Harry Gold. 

Q. I show yon Government's Exhibit 5 and ask yon if yon 
recognize this picture (showing to witness) Y 
A. Yea. 

(i). Who is it, pleaset 
A. .Harry (^lA 

Mr. Kilsheimer: (Showing the witness Government's Bi- 
hihit &). 

(). TtHio WAS present at yoor apartment at the time Harry 
Gold camcf 

A. My IttiKhiiiid and myself. 


Trial Transcript, p. G99 


Now note a second contradiction. In the handwritten statement Greenglass 
confesses: 

^Alfio I didn^t know who sent Gold to me*^ 

But on the witness stand he told a diflFerent story. He said Gold had been 
sent by Julius Rosenbeig: 

A. Tbaro was a knock on'tho door and 1 opened it. Wa 
had jnat completed eating breakfast, and there waa a man 
stan^ng In Uie hallway who asked if I were Mr. Qxoen- 
glaaa, uid I said yea. He stepped through the door and 
be aidd, .** Jnliiu sent me,*' and t said *'oh," and walked 
to my wife's parse, took out the wallet and took oof the 
matted pert of tha JeQo bn, - 

Trial Transcript, p. 457 

SUMMARY — Here are two direct contradictions on crucial points In 
the testimony. Greenglass admits he didn’t know who sent Gold to him, 
while in the trial he testified that it was Julius Rosenberg. In the document 
Greenglass places his wife outside the room on Gold’s alleged visit, whUe 
in the trial his wife claimed she was in the room* . 

THE MYSTERIOUS $4,000 


A vital contradiction in dales revealed by the new documents shatters 
Greenglass testimony abodt the $4,000 the Rosenbergs allegedly gave him to 
leave the country. 



12 - 






i- V% 




" ' A major premise of the prosecutioD was' that Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, 
at alfeg^ heads of a spy ctmspifacy, had large, sums of money available^ WhOe 
the Rosenbergs denied ever ^ving |4,000 to Greenglw^ Ciavid Greenglas testi- 


fied that he received ^,000 from Juliio Rdsetiber^ ^nd gave the money to^dne 
Louis Abel to Jiold. On Greenglass’ request, AW allq;edly used the mcmey to 
pay attorney O. John Rogge. Ruth Creenglass testified the money was paid on 


June 16, 1950. . 



.1 t z: 


f i - ‘<^6* ' V • - it r‘ J.- ' -T 

But the newly-discovered memorandum based on discussions that tot^ place 
two days later -on June 18, 1950 -describes “hnandal problems” and notes a 
request by Mrs. Creenglass that Rogge try to get himself court-appointed in the 
cases. The memorandum says: 


“We first discussed the question d arranging a meeting of 
various relatives at our oflSce to discuss financial problems. The rela- 
tives proposed are as follows ... 


“There was sub^quently present during the conference: Issy 
Fcit, Sam Creenglass, Bernard Creenglass, and Louis Abel • • . Mrs. 
Creenglass urged OJR to try io get a court appointment for himself 
and he agreed to try.” 


. Mrs. Creenglass, who in the above asked Rogge to become court-appointed, 
testified in the trial that she was aware of the payment of $4,000 before she left 
the hospital on June 16, 1950. ^ ^ , 

Ethel Rosenbeig, who denied ever giving the 14.006. testified as follows 
with respect to the Creenglass* need for money: 

Have yon enough money t** 

She said, **Wel), I have been asking my relatives and I 
am trying to raise money. It is pretty hard,** and she sort 
of looked at me ; so I said, **Look, Bnthie, I don't know what 
I would give to be able to say that I have some money that 
I can give you. I wish I could do that, but I really can*t 
at the moment. You know how it is. However, if I can 
think of anyone that might possibly lend 'me some money 
for you, yon can be sure I will do whatever 1 can,** and 
with that wc reached East Houston Street aj^I put my 
arms around her and kissed her. She remained rigid in 
my arms, didn’t return the kiss, said, *'Goodby’* coldly, 
turned on hen heel and left 

r 


4 


Trial Transcript, p. 1340 

- IS- 




SUMMARY — If in fact O. J. Rogge received $4,000 on June 1950 l 
would there he a conference on finaii^^ two dajs Ipter? Would . Mrs. 
Grewj^bsa, with full knowledge that the attorney had just received $4^006« 
ask him to become court-appointed, a request which implies O serioiis 


inabili^ to paj for l^al help? 

t , . ' ■ :< • >1 > ' : V • ' ■ 


' i T - • 1 -> * . ? 

: - >-H r::’ U * ‘ ^-r; ■ 


IT ' ^ 

If in fact Mrs. Greenglass did not pay the $4,000 through her hrotho^ 
in-law, Louis Abel, is there any proof whatsoever that the $4,000 actually 
'existed? . 


OTHER 0ISCRa>ANCIES 




• ^ ly‘ ^ ii. 




The foregoing have been a series ol ocanparisom between the court record 


and the newly discovered documents, in the Rosenberg case. The consistent 
pattern of discrepancies between the Greenglass testimony and the documents 
on some of the most vital points of this csise have been demonstrated. Also, it 
has been seen that the Rosenberg testimony in many cases is consistent with the 


documents. 


A number of other discrepancies are present in the discovered documents. 
For example, itr the documents Ruth' Greejiglass admits rhar ^'pec^Ie 
flocking in the house to offer support. and advice . l*i-^While in her testimtmy 
she insisted that no one had come to - Her house. In the document she admits 
“The Jewish Daily Forward ... has offered a lawyer’^ while in the testimony 
she denied s[^aking to any newspaper men during her first days at home. In thf* 
document she suggests “people in the neighborhood want to raise a petition . . 
(an act which implies a belief in innocence) while in her testimony she stoutly 
denied telling anyone she and her husband were mnocent. 

I * . 1 .*; > Mi.. ' . 1 . • ■ 

Finally, the reader must understand that Davi^^nd Ruth Gi^nglass swore 
on the witness stand that from the first hour of Greenglass* arrest^ they told the 
entire truth in the case. In cross-examination; defense attorney Emanuel Blcxdi 
drew from David Greenglass an admission that in his early statements he made 


14 - 





no menfibn of the transfer of atomic secrets ;uid did not implicate Ethel Rosen- 
berg. This pcnnt must be remembered when one sees that nowhere in the new 

_ . * 'ar . ^ ^ - ' • , - V '«ii < t ^ - 


documents is there any mention of. Ethel Ito^b^. ^ 




kVi 







vt ? 




CONaUSIONS 

j ^ r. ^ . - , : ■«-''* 

There is literally not one single statement in the newly-discovered documents 
which is not at variance with the trial ^stknpny. Smne of the points of difference 

are so obvious that even tli^ most cursory knowledge <ff the court record one is 

« » ' ' 

aware <rf the impcxtancc ot these differences. Other points are more subtle and 
require a study of the entire record as well as an understanding of the theory 
advanced by both the prosQcutimi and the defense. 


There is one part of the document, however, that ailmost defies description 
or analysis. David Greenglass* final statement in his written document reads 
as follows: “But this I can honestly say the information I gave Gold may be 
not at all what I said in the statement.'* 


What is the meaning of the above quote? Can one begin to speculate? 
What did Greenglass actually give Harry Gold? What is the actual crime that 
^ook place? Was the atCHn bomb sfolen by David Greenglass? 

Can there be any more basic question in a case in which two people are 
being sent to their death for the theft of the atom bomb?jCan we, after reading 
the above, lightly accent the fact that Julius and. Ethel Rosenberg will be 
executed for a crime which we are not even sure took place? 


If in two accidentally discovered documenu so many inconsistencies, so 
many open lies, and so many doubts become apparent, must we not wonder 
what future documents will unfold and what other obvious lies they will reveal? ’ 


American justice is the responsibility of all American citizens. Execution 
of the Rosenbergs despite the mountains of doubt ymuld be a tragic event that 
would reflect adversely on the good name of our country, and remain upon 
the consciences of all Ameritan citizens. We urge you to write and wire President 


Eisenhower to grant clemency to the Rosenbeigs so that the full facts in the case 
may come to lighL 




^ 15 ^ 



THE VERBATIM RRORD Of 
THE ROSEHBERG TRIAL 


1 ,hI 

; »?lj Mill 


'iiW iiK ■'} 






/ ‘LV i 





TV 


;^03 


One year ago the Rosenberg Committee took tlie im- 
precedented step of publishing the entire word-for-wocd 
record of the Rosenberg triah 

An entire first printing was sold and a new print- 
ing has just come off the . press. . .. vt., ^ v 


Ihousands of hwyeis, fudges, fniiusters. educators and 
sociologists have read this recoid and have become con- 
vinced that there are grave dotdals in the Rosenberg 



For ALL the facts in the case, for all the testimony 
of the Rosenbergs. Greenglasses, ERzabeth Bentfoy. Harry 
Gold — the Record is indispensable. 


'>i;: The Record k !■ et^ht smaR volume^ boned, and sels 
for $ AjO O L . • : i- ■ ' 




Please send me a copy the verbatim Seooid of the 
Rosenbeiig Trial, for which I enclose my £] chedt 
n money order Q cash for 56.00. 




I... , >' 


Name .. 
Address 




i :i . ■ 


City .L ; - j^ne State. 


□ 1 want more information bn the Rosenboig Ca^ 


V • .-v 




i - S aa : 


;n; .a t>a 


Write, President Dwight D, Rsenhow^: 

aEMENCY lor the ROSENBERG 


i'l 


.ML IMFOPMATin'I CCNTAIN 2 D:>., 
-,n ’i ' !.' j. ..i . y • ' : V : v o 








<■ : — 







meomnaKn wvmtBO a iti ^Aoivt • ii«t if a ^ v 

L’OSSERVATORE ROMAN( 


■MitBVATCSI 




POLITICO RELICIOSO 

non NlAlVAtlW^rt 


iTO.'SUi'tl > I » 


IMW Nr.' »•*. 
goMtxtmr IN NNN 



















FOREWORD 

On February 13, 1953, VOsservatore Rosnano, ofiScial newspaper 
of the Vatican, made public a message of Pope Pius XII asking tfiat 
clemency be granted Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. The paper said: 

"Certain newspapers have called the Holy Father to account con- 
cerning the fate of the Rosenbergs, as if he had remained unmoved 
by the various pleas addressed to him to intervene in their favor. Now 
if is well to know that His Holiness, even though unable to enter into 
the merits of the case, never refuses his interest, whenever it is a 
matter of saving human lives, out of the high motives of charity ap- 
propriate to his apostolic mission; and as he has done compassionately 
in several other similar cases, so also in this one he has not failed 
to intervene, as much as it was permitted him in the absence of any 
official relations with the competent Government authorities.” 

Since the intervention of the Vatican had not been made public by 
the U.S. government, many requests for clarification came to the 
Apostolic Delegation in Washington. The delegation issued the fol- 
lowing statement, also on Feb. 13: 

"At the request of the Holy See, the Apostolic Delegation com- 
municated last December to the American Department of Justice that 
the Holy Father had received numerous and urgent appeals to inter- 
vene in favor of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg; appeals which His Holi- 
ness, without' being able to enter into the merits of the question, felt 
it opportune out of the charitable purposes of his Apostolic Office, 
to bring to the knowledge of the U.S. civil authorities.” 

The same evening, the Pope sent another message, this time mak- 
ing certain it was handed to the President. The Apostolic Delegate 
stated in a letter to Sherman Adams, assistant to the President: 

“Furthermore, I am asked by the Holy See to inform the com- 
petent U.S. authorities that many more requests have been received 
by the Vatican asking the Holy Father to intercede for clemency for 
the Rosenbergs; and that left-wing newspapers continue to state that 
His Holiness has done nothing. I shall be most grateful to you if you 
will kindly notify the President of this.” 

The entire world was stirred by the appeals of the Vatican for 
clemency. 

• On April 16, 1953, VOsservatore Roniano published an elaboration 
of the Popes statement in a lei'.gtliy article signed by P. F. Cavelli, 
S. J., and prepared for La Civilta Cattolica. The first section dealt 
with the background of the Pope’s appeal. The second section, titled 
“The Significance of an Intervention,” is reprinted on the following 
pages. 


4 


On Api^ 16y 1953, “L’Osservatore 
Romano” published an elaboration of 
the Pope*s statement. The first section 
dealt ^ with the background of the 
Pope*s appeal. The second section, 
Sigm ^cance of an IrUerver^ 
tion/* is reprinted on the following 
pages. 



The Significance of an Intervention 

But neither the maneuvres which the Communists are developing in favor 
of the Rosenbergs, nor the indignation of Americans for the betrayal by which 
they feel seriously threatened, could dissuade the Pope from his intervention. 

It would wrong the consciousness which the Holy Father has of his divine 
mandate of mercy, and at the same time misunderstand the very great gifts 
of clearsightedness recognized in him by the world's esteem, to believe that 
he, in his goodness, fell victim, as some would insinuate, to the insidiousness 
of the Communists through the appeals directed to him. 

Not all the petitions addressed to his paternal heart were from Commu- 
nists. The death penalty is an extreme remedy which, no matter what the 
crime it auns to punish, arouses in certain people a lively repugnance. More 
numerous even are those whose goodness of soul causes diem to dwell on 
the pitful aspects of a punishment rather than its necessity, however serious 
the crime that deserved it. Further, the case of the young couple sentenced 
to die together is so pitiful as to arouse sincere commiseration even in those 
not animated by any ignoble partisan interest in wanting to save their lives. 
In particular, that a woman should wait in a “death chamber” for th e mo- 
ment of execution is in itself an event as tragic as it is rare and is such as to 
arouse instinctively a sense of horror. Wfeh, then, two children, Michael 
9 years old and Robert 5, are involved in this tearful fate, many hearts can 
be melted, before ^wo little innocents on whose soul and destiny the death 
of their parents would forever leave sinister scars. No one can deny how this 
circumstance at least gives reason to the heartfelt insistence of the mothers 


3 




who wanted to bring their agonized pleas to the Vicar of Him who dearly 
loved children. 

The Communists, who bear the full responsibility for this pitiful drama, 
wanted to use it as* an expedient of their propaganda against the United 
States, claiming reasons of justice and humanity and rejecting the results 
of the trial. But this is no reason why the sad fate of the couple and their chib 
dre should remain without an echo in the hearts of many and all the less so 
in the heart of the Holy Father. 

He, weighing the miserable and fraudulent calculation of many who, 
being enemies of God, prove themselves the worst enemies of man, acted 
out of those feelings which while bearing witness to the merciful mission 
of the Pontificate, honor at the same time the human soul in the most sublime 
fashion. 

Elevated to an oflSce which puts him above diflFerences which can divide 
peoples and individuals. Supreme Head of a religion erected on the law of 
love, representative on earth of Jesus who died forgiving his crucifiers, the 
Pope has received from God a law which is not that of common rulers. Father 
of all men, his appeal for the Rosenbergs, rendered more solemn by the suf- 
fering of the illness which struck him at that time, admirably fits in with the 
entire work of his Pontificate, which coincides with one of the unhappiest 
periods in all history. 

Teacher and guide of the people, with the torch of Christ’s doctrine, the 
Pope at the same time is perennially called from his sublime oflSce to bow, as 
did Jesus, before the sufferings which afflict the human race in every age. 

But divine Providence has shown that in this Pontiff particularly it wants 
a pious Samaritan for the sorrows which in such large measure are and have 
been the tragic heritage of these years. ^ ^ 

It was the Pontiff who tried every way to preserve the world from war; 
and who one day when he went forth in person among the ruins and blood 
shed by bombardments even around the Vatican, had already accomplished 
a tremendous labor to soften the frightful consequences of four years of war; 
writing indelible pages capable of redeeming partially at least the horrendous 
cruelty of the conflict. Pages that profoundly registered in the hearts of mil- 
lions raised up by his sublime call to a more serene vision in an hour of dark- 
ness and sorrows and comforted in innumerable cases through the intervention 
of his charity. 

It is not out of place to recall the work done by the Information Offices 
of the Vatican in response to the thousands of agonized requests that came 
to the Holy Father personally from all parts of the world; the visits to the 
P.O.W. camps o( his representatives; the material and spiritual aids given to 

4 


• # 


throngs of sufferers. ... At war s end, but his mournful balance not closed, 
there went the Pope, pursuing his unexhausted mission of mercy among the 
sick, the needy, the prisoners, the institutionalized, particularly the infants, 
who in more than one country suffered most and are still suffering from the 
dreadful effects of the war. 

The whole Catholic Church with its central and peripheral organization, 
gave of itself in an immense and divine charitable undertaking, as is com- 
manded by the spirit of its divine Founder, and which today stands forth 
luminously in the words and labor of the Vicar who represents Him on earth. 

It is not by chance that the Holy Father s gesture in favor of the Rosen- 
bergs falls in with the aid he sent in those same days to the unfortunate 
flood victims in England, Belgium and HoUand. 

This Pontiff, then, certainly had the right, by nature of his mission and 
his accomplishments, to exercise again an act of charity for which his paternal 
heart had been appealed to with so much insistence. Furthermore, the Holy 
Father was not performing an unusual gesture, even with respect to the par- 
ticular character of the intervention in favor of the Rosenbergs. As a matter 
of fact, as L Osservatore Romano recalled in the above ihentioned commu- 
nique, he “never refuses his interest when it is requested to save human lives, 
out of the higher motives of his apostolic ministry ... as he has compas- 
sionately done in several other similar cases. . , 

UNINTERRUPTED. TRADITION OF CHARITY 

The whole history of the Popes frequently speaks of their actions upon 
state authorities in behalf of men of every condition and faith. Not a small 
part of the immense and constant work of charity accomplished by the Pon- 
tiffs could come precisely under the heading of “humanitarian intervention.” 

Says an eminent scholar of international law:^ -The expression is derived 
from the modem diplomatic practice which recognized, especially in the last 
century, various cases of this species of intervention, celebrated as one of the 
major conquests of our time, and as one of the ways the modem sense of 
humanity manifests itself.” Now, continues this illustrious jurist, “in no epoch 
has this humanitarian intervention used by states had so energetic forms or 
was used so frequently” as by the Popes “in remote medieval times.” 

And from then on it has never been Jess, while in these last years it has 
shone with singular splendor in the Pontificate of Pius XII. 

Newspapers and periodicals have tried to give some indications of this. 
Still the few lines remained inadequate to the argument which demands 
another development. Even our brief and inorganic illustrations lift only a 
comer* of the veil discreetly extended over how much the Supreme Pontiff 
accomplished during the conflict on this question. 

5 


Several examples chosen among many constitute a glorious and imposing 
documentation, to which are added many more when the tragic fate of Italy 
and the greater facility for reaching the Holy Father were such that He re- 
ceived numerous appeals in behalf of unhappy victims of capital punish- 
ment at the hands of German and Fascist authorities. Previously the Holy 
Father's interventions had become so frequent and so pressing as to induce 
the German Ambassador to the Holy See to express a hope that intercessions 
on behalf of those condemned by the military authorities be reduced. 

The Holy See answered him that “we cannot avoid (when it seems op- 
portune to do so) invoking clemency from the competent authorities even 
if it be annoying or superfluous to do so." 

These interventions do not counter, but instead fall in with the just and 
necessary equilibrium of the functions of higher personages in whose hands 
rest the fates of peoples and individuals. 

There are judicial and executive powers in the high administrations of 
nations; but there are also moral powers which, if they cannot rigorously 
appeal to the Right, can claim a sacred majesty from the splendor of Science, 
the value of notable personal merits, the nobility of proven sentiments, the 
august dignity of a religious mission. To some, God has entrusted the scales 
of justice defended by the sword; to the others, He has commissioned the 
part of moderator and illuminator, which would be too short-sighted not to 
take into consideration. 

Coming to the interv’ention of the Holy Father in behalf of the Rosenbergs, 
it was not intended to be and was not an undue interference in the domestic 
affairs of another power, nor an invasion of its authority. Better than every- 
one, the Pontiff knew the limits within which he had to keep by virtue of his 
ecclesiastic and interna donal prerogatives. If one consider it well, the Pope 
did not make a formal appeal in favor of the Rosenbergs; he pointed out to 
the American government that many demands were made upon him to inter- 
cede for their salvation. Presenting his discreet but nonetheless eloquent 
appeal, which carried the weight of his august personality, the Holy Father 
declared that he was not entering into the merits of the case. With this, his 
intervention had nothing in common with the campaign artificially unleashed 
by the Communists, who without qualification labeled the Rosenbergs' 
sentence illegal and unjust, substituting themselves for the courts which had 
examined the Rosenbergs' faults. It was not for the Pope to pronounce him- 
self on the merits of the accusations, or on the exigencies of a procedure 
which seemed to have been scrupulously observed, or on the testimony, or 
the ratio of the crime to the punishment. All the more so in a trial which had 
the concurrence of the great majority of citizens not only in America but 
out of it; and was such that, outside of a few sporadic criticisms, it was not 

6 




4 


easy to find a single one of those evident characteristics which distinguish 
trials in Communist countries, particularly against the Catholic clergy and 
Bishoprics. The Holy Father did not pose a single doubt or raise a single 
suspicion on tiiis score. 

Apart from the conclusions of the judges and the deliberation of the 
powers called in final petition for a verdict on the commutation, he made a 
plea for mercy. It was up to the Head of the State, to whom the case was 
brought, to consider the solemn appeal in the comprehensive examination of 
all those motives which not for the only time in history, have induced a ruler 
to overcome with clemency the rigid confines of justice. If, in spite of this, 
the President did not see fit to grant clemency, the Supreme PontiflF did not 
intend to question who was to decide judgment, taking into accoimt all the 
aspects of this sad case. 

Neither in taking his step did the Holy Father deny, as was inconsider- 
ately reproached him, the right of peoples to defend themselves against the 
insidiousness of internal enemies who today in no small measure try to open 
the road to outside enemies. It is well known, furthermore, that the Catholic 
Church does not condemn in principle the death sentence, the extreme 
punishment which certain crimes can demand when they seriously threaten 
the common welfare. 

INCOMPREHENSIBLE SECTARIANISMS 

These obvious considerations w^ere not understood by everyone. 

One must read with horror certain sharp words of those who wished that 
night should give no peace to him who contributed to changing the course 
of justice already pronounced on the two prisoners. The Christian, placed be- 
fore the raw decisions of courts, even when he approves of them and demands 
them, knows how to find in his heart and in his religion a sentiment of com- 
passion for him who, having sinned, must now suffer the punishment, no 
matter how just for his misdeeds. He himself, with, all the esteem he may be 

held by his fellowmen, knows that he has more need of mercy than justice 
before God. Therefore, not with the diabolical yearning for vendetta, but 
with regret that others, having been found wanting, must expiate, does Man, 
and more so, a Christian, accept and when necessary, demand that justice 
fulfill its hard function. 

It is again displeasing that in the intervention of the Holy Father, some 
should pretend to see an intrusion of a “foreign citizen.” The Holy Father is 
a sovereign and in this case appeared the more majestic in that, divested of 
any national particularity, he became a herald of a principle which transcends 
particularistic regions and touches the highest summit of the Christian and 
human spirit. 

\ 

7 


/ 


Thus he was not a foreign citizen when he, without regard to nationality 
or politics, nor questioning the demands of military codes, shunned the fear 
that his steps might be misinterpreted and permitted himself to ask many 
times for an act of clemency in order to save a human life. 

The reproach to the Holy Father that he was being indulgent to Commu- 
nists in intervening in behalf of the Rosenbergs and the reminder that Com- 
munism is inhumanly persecuting Cardinals, Bishops, Priests, Monks, and 
Nuns, was out of place. This was an unjust and irreverent act, for in no other 
heart does the painful fate of the persecuted of Christ echo as much as in 
the heart of the Holy Father; nevertheless, feeling the suflFerings of so many 
oppressed ones, it is not forbidden one who is the repository of universal 
fatherhood to make a merciful gesture for whoever suflFers under the burden 
of sorrow, be they innocent or guilty. 

There were those who wished to stir up dissension between Catholics and 
Protestants on a sectarian basis for an act which is evident from its nature 
to be above all divisions, when the discreet limits to which the appeal con- 
fined itself should have found agreement from those who worship the same 
God. 


Finally, it is most inopportune to claim the separation of Church and 
State existing in the Republic, in order to reject the Holy Fathers plea. Not 
only was this plea addressed precisely to the advantage of two non-Catholics, 
but it, though not taking account of the theological reasons that flowed from 
the religion which the Roman Pontiff heads, had its moral justification for 
Ihc appeals made to the liighest principles of huinanitarianism; an historical 
coherence conforming to thousands of years traditions among the civ'iliza- 
tions of peoples, a precise- and solid juridical foundation in the diplomatic 
customs of many centuries, concretized in institutions conferring on all the 
right to humanitarian intervention. 

Thus the appeal of the Holy Father, far from causing even a minimum 
harm to the majesty of civil power and the cause of justice, highly honored 
them, both by its call to the noble sovereignity of mercy, and by the dignity 
of its noble intercessor. 

There is no doubt that when history returns to this episode, it will seal 
with a word of highest praise^ 

PontiflF. 





Reprinted as a Public Service by the 
National Committee to Secure Justice in the Rosenberg. Case. 
1050 Sixth Ave., New York 18, N. Y* LO 4-9585 


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POEMS AND SONGS FOR 


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Ethel and Mm 
ROSENBERG 

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Death House 
at Sing Sing 


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POEMS AND SONGS FOR v 

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[thel wid Ailius 
ROSENBERG 

in fhe ^ 

Death House 
> at Sing Sing 

> 

by . 

EDITH SEGAL 

A People's Artish Publication 







i 

Also by Edith Segal: 

VICTORY VERSES FOR YOUNG AMERICANS 
(with others) 

BE MY FRIEND and Other Poems for Young People 



Additional copies of this book 
may be purchased from the 
publishers. A special discount 
is offered when ordered in large 
quantities. 


COPVRIGHT, 1953 
BY Edith Segal 


Published by 

PEOPLE’S ARTISTS, INC. 

799 Broadway New York 3, N, Y. 



209 


t 


Foreword 

rpHE struggle to save the lives of Ethel and Julius Rosen- 
berg reflects the universal humanitarian response at 
the plight of two individuals. It is an expression of genu- 
ine self-concern on the part of millions who know that 
the terror now stalking these two innocent people is a 
threat to the lives and liberties of all. A tremendous num- 
ber of people, including leading scientists, lawyers, and 
jurists, hav^ raised serious questions about the facts of the 
case and th^ judicial procedure involved. If, in the face 
of these questions,, the Rosenbergs are.Vxecuted by a 
vengeful state, no individual will be safe from unjust per- 
secution. 

* * * 

¥N the, course’ of this struggle, the poems and songs of 
Edith Segal have been a beacon of inspiration and 
hope in the tradition of Emile Zola. To writers and ar- 
tists she has given a brilliant example of the way to voice 
the deep-felt prayers of millions. To those who have 
marched on picket-lines and climbed endless-* flights of 
stairs in search of justice and truth, these lines of word 
and song have captured the burning emotions of the 
heart and mind; And to the two people now in Sing Sing’s ' 
Death House, these poems echo the strength and com- 
passion of an enraged world which will virite the final 
song of justice triumphant to the case of Ethel and Julius 
Rosenberg. 

People s Arfisfs 


Additional information, including the official trial 
record of the case, may be obtained from: 

Committee To Secure Justice in the Rosenberg Case 
1050 Sixth Avenue, New York 18, N. Y. 


3 


|V: • - ■ .-rv i-4?? ‘ ^ " 


1 


Dear Ethel and Julius Rosenberg: 

It is 5 am., April 6th, 1953. You are locked in 
your cells, asleep — or trying to sleep. 

We have never met. Yet today, as for many months, 
you have been with me as with countless new friends, 
far into the inspired night. 

Now in the seemingly quiet hour that welcomes 
another dawn, this little book stands ready for the 
printer. He will multiply it many times. 

For its message we will find new ears, new hearts, 
new hands to hurry for you and Morton Sobell the 
dawn which will open the gates for your home- 
coming, and to peace for all of us. 

Edith Segal 





f' 


Give U$ Your Hand! 

Tonight i 

as you quietly draw the curtain 

on the day’s activity 
and reclining 

contemplate the fertile promise of unborn time 

imagine 

you 

are Ethel or Julius Rosenberg 
in the Death House at Sing Sing 

The dimness is a fog 

your eyes defy 

Sleep is a luxury long lost 

After dignity — time 
being most treasured 

measured by the hurrying steps of death- 
even napping is a thief 

Suddenly there’s light in your cell 

in the prison block 

in the house on Monroe Street 

where you lived with your children 

in the narrow streets 

of New York’s lower east side, your city 

in every city in the land 
in the assembly halls in all the schools, 
your school, P.S. 88 

where you stood with your hand upon your 
heart 

as you faced the flag and said the words 
that were to give your life direction: 

With Liberty ajid Justice For All 


Now 

you stand at the bars of your cell 

with your hands cupped wide at your mouth 

and shout to the world at the top of your lungs: 

IF YOU SLEEP WHILE THEY KILL US 
WILL THEY KILL YOU WHILE YpU SLEEP? 

If you ever breathed too deeply 
the air of brotherhood 
clasped black and white hands 
in your neighborhood 

* or gave a dime 
for democratic Spain A* 

or signed your name 
to nominate your choice 
,a voice for peace 

WILL THEY KILL YOU WHILE YOU SLEEP 
IF YOU SLEEP WHILE THEY KILL US? 

We yearn to live see our children grow 
but if we burn then part of them 
and part of you will turn to dust 
and death will haunt our home, our land 

GIVE US YOUR HAND! 

Let us stand in the sunlight 

when the wind is still 

and the din of war subsides into the sea 

and scales are righted 

and our worth declared. to be 

among the living 

to mould the fertile promise of unborn time— 

Time! 

Tomorrow they die 

Unless we make their cry a warning 

DEA TH IS IN O UR LAND! 

GIVE US YOUR HAND! 




6 


“r 

r 


My Loved One 


Words and Music by Edith Segal 



What shines from your cell 
To my lonely cell, my loved one? 

What shines from your cell 
To my lonely cell, my loved one? 

Your eyes like bright stars 
Shining through prison bars, 

Your eyes like bright stars, my loved one. 

Oh if I could bring 

Oh what* would I bring my loved one? 

Oh if I could bring 

Oh what would I bring my loVed one^ 
rd bring a red rose 
And my heart Td enclose, 
rd bring a red rose, my loved one. 

Oh if I could speak 

Oh what would I say, my loved one? 

Oh if 1 could speak 
Oh what would I say, my loved one? 
rd say ‘*I love you 
Our love’s old, our love’s new,” 
rd say ”I love you,” my loved one. 

Oh if we could sing 

Of what would we sing, my loved one? 

Oh if we could sing 

Of what would we sing, my loved one? 

We’d sing of the light 
That comes out of dark night. 

We’d sing of the light, my loved one. 

Will our children laugh. 

Will we hear them laugh, my loved one? 
Will our children laugh, 

Will we hear them laugh, mv loved one? 

We know it will be 

For the people and we 

Will fight till we’re free, my loved one. 




Mon SeuI Amour 1 

(From Les Leltres Franfoises, Paris, January, 1953) 

. . Plus haul que la dimesure monte le chant raison- 
nable des hommes. II est Id, imouvant et tendre, 
dans cette chanson d’une Amiricaine, Edith Segal, 
MY LOVED ONE, dMiee a Ethel et Julius Rosen- 
berg, “pour la puret^ et la digniti de leur amour.”* 

Oh! si je pouvais donner 

Que donnerais-je k mon seul amour? 

Je donnerais un rose rouge 
Dans mon coeur je Tenfermerais 
Pour la donner k mon seul amour. 

Oh! si je pouvais chanter 

Que chanterais-je k mon seul amour? 

Je chanterais la lurai^re 

Qui jaillit de la nuit noire 

Je chanterais la lumi^re, mon seul amour. 

Nos enfants riront-ils? 

Les entendrons-nous rire. mon seul amour. 

Nous savons. que oui 

Car le people et nous-memes 

Combattrons jiisqira la liberty, mon seul amour. 

♦ Translation: The reasonable chant of mankind 
mounts immeasurably. Moving and tender, it is here 
in this song by an American, Edith Segal, dedicated 
to Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, “for the purity and 
dignity of their love.” 


The Conscience Of Our Time 


Innocent 
must they die 

or 

N must they lie 

to live \ 

^ V 

falsely naming other names 
for death 

% 

and living thus 
not live at all? 

Uh mortal man 
and mortal womani 

with your love 

and with your vision 

making the supreme decision! 

From the death house ' 
moving the universe 
to reverse this crime 

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg 
You 

are the conscience of our time! 


10 


1 


i 


Valentine Vigil 

Valentine's Day I 

February 14, 1952 ' 

Washington, D. C. 

A vigil for lovers 

Whose love includes others, 

A vigil for lovers 

On Valentine’s Day 

For husband and wife 

Who love truth, who love life, 

A vigil for lovers 

On Valentine’s Day 

For mother and dad ' ' 

Of two lads, young and sad, t 

A vigil for lovers 

On Valentine’s Day 

, ^ 

For life, for humanity 
Chanting for clemency, 

A vigil for lovers t 

On Valentine’s Day 


The Power To Hope 

“Mr. Bloch, I do not think any purpose would be 
served by further delay of the date of execution ex- 
cept to increase the mental anguish of the defend- 
ants, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, and possibly to 
raise false hopes for them." 

Judge Kaufman, February 13, 1953 

% 

How '.shallow your heart? 

How deep your blinding hatel \ 

You ask. Judge Kaufman, 

"What purpose would it serve 
now to delay the date? 

What sets man from animal apart 
If not the power to hope, to feel. 

The thing we call the human heart? 

You sniff for their hurried death 
You snarl at their mounting hope 

The world’s good people 
build it high, 

'T he Pope renews 

his strangely buried cry. 

We seek to spare them even one fciint sigh 

One needless tear 

Their eyes have been wept dry. 

Two lives, two hearts we mean to spare. 


Armed with our dream 
We hurry forth to dare! 


Two In Death Row 


How many names - 
does it take 
to shame our land? 


two 

in death row 
at Sing Sing 

How many crimes 
does it take 
to shake our land? 

two 

in death row 
at Sing Sing 

How many voices 
does it take 
to wake the world? 

two 

in death row 
at Sing Sing 


How many hands 
does it take 
to span the world? 


two 

and four 

and millions more 


for 

two 

in death row 
at Sing Sing 


A Daily Question 

Everyday 

I pass that way — 

Gimbel’s 

evening gown display 

What are you wearing today 
-Ethel Rosenberg, \ 

That same old prison grey? 


Menu 

On the Rosenberg Train 
from Washington 
someone sighed: 

Oh for a juicy steak 

with onions and french fried 

What was your dish tonight, 
Ethel and Julius, 

served with death 
on the side? 


14 


15 


For Helen Sobell 


1 


Chant For Life 

I'he President’s in the White House 
Behind the iron gate. 

The Clemency Vigil circles round 
Early and late. 

The Judge is in the Court House 
In haste to set the date. 

The Clemency Vigil circles round 
Early and late. 

He’s ready at the switches. 

The killer in robes of State, 

The Clemency Vigil circles round 
Early and late. 

The Rosenbergs in the Death House, 
Oh what will be their fate? 

The Clemency Vigil circles round 
Early and late. 

The People in their homelands 
Watch the White House gate. 

The Clemency Vigil circles round 
Early and late. 


Your voice 
subdued 

in penetrating challenge 

chills the blood 

and wakens the sleeping heart: 

I have thirty years . 
to fight for my husband 
but we have only days 
' to save the Rosenbergs 

\ 

You tower 
above the crude, 
the legal lies 

Your dear brown eyes 
envision the longed-for day 

the reunion of lovers 
of families 
of children at play 
with childhood ease 

Sing Sing to Alcatraz 
the span is long 

but the Rosenbergs . 
and Mort Sobell 
shall hear our song 
which you have given depth 
and soaring overtone 

and he 

and they 

shall sing with us 


J 


Nightmare 

I awoke in fright 
. out of the fevered night 


It luas done 

and they were dead! 


Staring blindly in the dark 
confusion pounding at my heart 


/ could have done much mote 
than I had done 


Trembling, I raised the blind 
only to find 

Dark buildings 
quiet as death 

Good people of the world now mourn 
shame to our land and scorn! 


Suddenly the dawn 

Brought sanity and speeding time! 




For Lovers 

When two who love 

are barred from their embrace 

When the face, the eyes 
wear the disguise of patience 

and the yearning is slated 
to find release in burning 

Can we who love 
be free? 



Dreaming of Waltzing 

Words and Music by Edith Segal 





Whisp* - ring sweet words to you, 

.EiOL 



h r , r j 


With the ma - gic of 
G F7 A7 


a p p j 


we’re a ^ way, 


Waite • ing 



high pri - son walls, 


Xnd In - to the 



of day. 


I'm dreaming of waltzing, darling. 

Just as we used to do. 

Gliding and gently swaying, 

Whisp’ring sweet words to you. 

We step from our cells, they vanish. 
With the magic of truth, we’re away 
, Waltzing down the dim halls 
' Past the high prison walls 
And into the light of day. 

Remember our wedding party, 

We danced for the family. 

Joyously all applauded. 

They said we’d live happily. 

Again in your arms, you hold me, 

The shadow of death torn away. 
Waltzing down the dim halls 
Past the high prison walls 
And into the light of day. 

Our children are waiting for us. 

Like flow’rs in the sun they stand. 
Their faith in us now rewarded, 
Clapping their little hands. 

The people who fought for justice. 
Who saved us from death, we embrace. 
Arm in arm we go forth. 

Holding our sons aloft. 

Building peace in the new life we face. 



light 


21 


Take Your Place 


‘'Little children sweet and gay, 
Carousel is running 
Hurry, hurry, take your place 
Or you'll surely be too late." 

Children's Singing Game 


Endlessly circling 

the near-White House pavement 

The heart-beat of history 
heard in our tread 

Firmly grasping 
our Rosenberg placards 

We challenge the windstorm, 
the Washington night 

Across our proud chests 
hang banners of cardboard 

marked with the hope 
of two innocent lives 

resounding through factories 
government chambers, 
kitchens, farms, schools, 
houses of prayer 

through Africa, Asia, 

Europe, Australia, 

South America, 
back to Times Square 

Stronger the heart-beat 
Our circle expanding 

Standing in dignity 
Mankind responds! 


22 


THREE POEMS FOR 

ROBERT and MICHAEL ROSENBERG 

Some Day 

Some day 

to Dave Greenglass' 
we’ll say: 

"Uncle, V 

why did you lie that way?” 


A Man Called Manny 

There is a man called Manny, 

We love to hold his hand 
And tell him everything we feel 
Because he’ll understand. 

Manny Bloch’s a very great lawyer 
But guess what he is even more! 

The most wonderful friend we have in the world. 
Though we didn’t know him before, 

•'i , 

Manny takes us to Sing Sing. 

To see our pop and mom 
And that’s the best of all the things — . 

Except if they’d come home. 






Kids Grow Fa*^ 

When your mother and dad 
are taken away 

When you cry in the night 

for yesterday 

^ kids grow fast 

When they call your parents 
A-Bomb Spies 

When you know they re telling 
crazy lies 

When they store at you 
with mean old eyes 

kids grow fast 


When the pape« 
rosenbergs to die 


When you visit the Jail 
and try not to cry 

kids grow fast 


When millions of people 
suddenly care 

And write to the President 
from everywhere 

To save Mom and Dad 

from the electric chair 

kids grow fast 


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^■■■■■_ -'^-'". -h' • •■ li an "'erganliafieR of 

POOpiG S Artists tfralglit-AlnUng, plain* 

talking vritterti compos- 
ers, singers, and other creative artists vdio believe that aO art 
fundamentally comes from the work* the struggles, and the dreams 
of ordinary people. It seeks to promote, through many varied forms 
of creative expression, the basic concepts of peace, brotherhood, and 
democracy. One of Its many activities b the publication of a 
monthly song magazine, “Sing OutP”, which contains folk songs, 
songs of other f^ples, and hew works which “sing ouf^ the dangera 
and the hopes of our^times. The two songs in this volume, for 
instant, first appeared in "Sing Outl" Subscriptions to this maga* 

r 

zine are $2.00 ^ year, and should be addressed to People's Arttsfs, 
Inc., 799 Broadway, New York 3, N. Y. 





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"Hi 


^ is a^^et, dancer, and musician who 

COltll ^O^dl has given generously, of her talents 

amP energies to many struggles for 
JusKce and human dignify. Thl^ yolume of poetry was written over the 
past six months, during t(m course of the campaign to save the lives 
of Ethel and Julius Rosenl^rg. The poems and .songs have already 
been used by singers and actors at many meetings and rallies de- 
voted to this struggle. Her^ poems for the Rosenberg children are 
a natural outgrowth of her work, with and for youngsters which was 
"highlighted by heir recent book, *'Be My Friend, and Other Poems 
for Young Peofie."' 








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